Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Tri-tip trick

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 346
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 4:34 pm    Post subject: Tri-tip trick Reply with quote

Friend gave me this trick a couple days ago and it works perfectly!

Instead of roasting or baking or broiling a tri-tip, slice it across the grain at about inch slices, then pound a little (not a lot) flatter between wax paper.

Then proceed to broil or grill the pounded slices.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1026
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

try that with a pork tenderloin - slightly thinner slices tho - pound/season/flour saute about 1.5 - 2 minutes per side.

mouth melting.....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or grind it up along with chuck for yer burgers. Drape bacon over it and install to smoker/grill. OH yeah baby!

Biggles
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pbonefirst



Joined: 03 Jul 2014
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2014 2:36 am    Post subject: tri tips Reply with quote

um...what is a tri tip? Sirloin tip?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1026
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Jul 05, 2014 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

..what is...

/quote
The tri-tip roast or steak (also called a triangle roast) is the 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 pounds of meat that sits at the bottom of the sirloin. Not only does it have a rich flavor, but also tends to be lower in fat than most other cuts. Of course, this means that it can dry out faster, but with a good marinade you really can't go wrong with this cut.
/unquote

basically it is one of those often overlooked but flavorful cuts.

was once upon a time an inexpensive thing. but, going back a few years, it's like ossa bucco - butchers darn near gave away the shanks. then Emeril did a show - and overnight the price went from little to uber-mucho.

tri-tip has had the same fate - along with flat iron / skirt / plate cuts - got popularized and got veddy expensive.

so but anyhow it is good eating.....when done right - which applies to most cuts, eh?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 346
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2014 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Same price increase occured with my beloved beef tongue.

Used to be cheap as hell, but something, somewhere happened...

I suppose tripe is next. Teasing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tri-tips around these parts tend to be huge 3 to 5 pounds. And you're right, I believe the standard price around here is 7.99 a pound. I won't pay that, of course. I wait for sales and if I get there early enough in the morning, during the week, they have a buy it/cook it today or it'll rot tomorrow price. Always a perfect meal, especially if the bulk of the fat cap has been left in place.

Biggles
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 346
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DrBiggles wrote:
I wait for sales and if I get there early enough in the morning, during the week, they have a buy it/cook it today or it'll rot tomorrow price.


LOL, I do the same thing. I have learned (and you don't want to know how) that ground products are generally not fit for consumption, even at 30 or 50% off.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Cooley wrote:
DrBiggles wrote:
I wait for sales and if I get there early enough in the morning, during the week, they have a buy it/cook it today or it'll rot tomorrow price.


LOL, I do the same thing. I have learned (and you don't want to know how) that ground products are generally not fit for consumption, even at 30 or 50% off.


I've lucked out and our local mega mart does really well with their meat turnaround. Even their discounted ground beef is well worth the price of admission.

I roasted a tritip last night, paid full price. My oldest is visiting, time off rom jr college, so it was necessary. I over cooked the poor thing, brought it to 150. Oddly enough, it was plenty juicy, exceptionally tender. I didn't lament about it, didn't say a word. Nobody mentioned my faux pas, that was nice.

Biggles
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group