Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Bread Flour Substition

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
n2y2



Joined: 14 Apr 2011
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:07 pm    Post subject: Bread Flour Substition Reply with quote

I was making a batch of bread when I ran out of bread flour. I Googled for a substitution and found this one:

1 cup AP flour
1 Tbsp Gluten

I used the substitution for the remaining loaves. The bread turned out fine. I could not perceive any difference in rise, texture or taste.

Here are the prices at my local bulk dealer of the different flours (in US cents):
Bread - 3.3/oz
Unbleached AP - 1.9/oz
Gluten - 15.9/oz

The homemade bread flour substitution mix costs 2.7 cents per oz. That is an 18% savings over purchasing the bread flour. Not a whole bunch, but as an engineer, I am into efficiency.

Here is the question: Is my homemade bread flour a perfect substitution, or does the commercial bread flour have other beneficial components which I am missing by mixing my own?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1006
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>Here is the question: Is my homemade bread flour a perfect substitution, or does the commercial bread flour have other beneficial components which I am missing by mixing my own?

yes, no. and certainly maybe.

I'm a King Arthur Bread Flour fan - no apologies offered - works for me, I don't work for them.

"bread flour" often has additives that make thing go better. diastatic malt powder is one.

however, such additives only help - the underlying properties are more important and "boosting" the gluten content basically makes "bread flour" of "AP flour"

the catch is simply that "no name" flours do not offer a consistent product. what works today may not work next month. if you're going to get serious about baking:

1. weigh _everything_

2. get real cotton picking particular about the "quality" essentials of all ingredients.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Guest






PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert wrote:

the catch is simply that "no name" flours do not offer a consistent product. what works today may not work next month. if you're going to get serious about baking:

1. weigh _everything_

2. get real cotton picking particular about the "quality" essentials of all ingredients.

Thanks for the advice

I have been experimenting with and tweaking my whole wheat bread for a while now. I have made 100's of loaves over the last 18 months and still don't have the recipe perfected, but I am getting closer.

It is ~60% whole wheat flour - which I grind myself from hard white wheat berries. Another 10% comes from a crushed multi-grain cereal mix and the balance is bread flour. It is seriously delicious; store bought bread is nearly unpalatable now.

I have tried half-a-dozen varieties of flour (including King Aurthur), but I did not see any variability in the end result, so I have just been using Gold Medal bread flour and the store brand unbleached AP.

The things that I have seen make a larger difference are:
*measure by weight (as you suggest)
*Various soaker methods
*Performing the final mix to the ideal dough consistency very slowly - taking 30 minutes where most recipes call for shorter mix times. I am fairly certain it has to do with the gluten-water absorption rate.
*Baking with a pan of boiling hot water in the oven.
*I have also recently started incorporating a biga, with mixed results
Back to top
n2y2



Joined: 14 Apr 2011
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 10:58 pm    Post subject: whoops Reply with quote

Had not realized that I was not logged in there. The 'guest' is me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
zaaylo



Joined: 03 Sep 2011
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
Dilbert wrote:

the catch is simply that "no name" flours do not offer a consistent product. what works today may not work next month. if you're going to get serious about baking:

1. weigh _everything_

2. get real cotton picking particular about the "quality" essentials of all ingredients.

Thanks for the advice

I have been experimenting with and tweaking my whole wheat bread for a while now. I have made 100's of loaves over the last 18 months and still don't have the recipe perfected, but I am getting closer.

It is ~60% whole wheat flour - which I grind myself from hard white wheat berries. Another 10% comes from a crushed multi-grain cereal mix and the balance is bread flour. It is seriously delicious; store bought bread is nearly unpalatable now.

I have tried half-a-dozen varieties of flour (including King Aurthur), but I did not see any variability in the end result, so I have just been using Gold Medal bread flour and the store brand unbleached AP.

The things that I have seen make a larger difference are:
*measure by weight (as you suggest)
*Various soaker methods
*Performing the final mix to the ideal dough consistency very slowly - taking 30 minutes where most recipes call for shorter mix times. I am fairly certain it has to do with the gluten-water absorption rate.
*Baking with a pan of boiling hot water in the oven.
*I have also recently started incorporating a biga, with mixed results

>>I have tried half-a-dozen varieties of flour (including King Aurthur), but I did not see any variability in the end result, so I have just been using Gold Medal bread flour and the store brand unbleached AP. <<

Interesting!.. Please describe in brief.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
vassaknivar



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 1
Location: India

PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice

I have been experimenting with and tweaking my whole wheat bread for a while now. I have made 100's of loaves over the last 18 months and still don't have the recipe perfected, but I am getting closer.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
harryluthor



Joined: 03 Feb 2012
Posts: 1
Location: 602 Ravens Lake Dr, Anderson, IN 46012

PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have just started trying my hand in baking and this is something good and new to learn. This will surely help me at initial level and one day I will surely excel in it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
referpatients



Joined: 17 Apr 2012
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2012 3:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

are the any other alternatives that you can absolutely found in the kitchen?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ivandred



Joined: 18 Apr 2012
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2012 6:06 am    Post subject: Whew!! Reply with quote

I'm glad there are forums like these....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group