Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Titanium cookware
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Tools, Equipment, and Gadgets
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
AdmNAismit not signed in
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2007 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cast iron is completely non-stick so long as you keep it well seasoned.
It also holds heat evenly and is pretty much hypo-allergenic.
Back to top
CookNewb
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The good thing about titanium cookware is that titanium oxide is a tough non stick surface.
Back to top
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CookNewb wrote:
The good thing about titanium cookware is that titanium oxide is a tough non stick surface.



What COLOR is the cooking surface of your pan??????

What is the manufacturer's name?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 3:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since when is titanium non-stick?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Thu Oct 09, 2008 4:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael Chu wrote:
Since when is titanium non-stick?

Maybe if you season it like cast iron.


My asking the color of the "titanium" oxide cooking surface was really a trick question. Big smile Big smile

CP titanium and titanium alloys, like grade V, are silvery when machined or polished, and light gray when acid etched or blasted with various abrasive media. Freshly machined or polished titanium forms a monolayer of titanium oxide (a mixture of TiO, TiO2 and Ti2O3, the TiO2 being the predominant species) in a nanosecond. Within a milisecond, the oxide grows to 15-50 nm and then pretty much stays at that range in air. Oxidative environments can cause a slight increase in the oxide thickness over time. Various proprietary processes can increase the thickness, but those oxide enhanced surfaces are unmistakably pale gray, and rough in texture--definitely NOT a smooth nonstick surface. I look at titanium oxide surfaces daily, and titanium ISN'T black or dark gray like the "titanium" surfaced pans I've seen in various stores.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CookNewb
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Oct 09, 2008 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll have to go back and find where I read that titanium oxide is a non stick surface. I read it in passing so I don;t even know if it was just marketing propaganda.
Back to top
Guest
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:42 am    Post subject: My experience with Titanium cookware Reply with quote

I purchased some of the "exclusive titanium" cookware from Germany. I bought it in Toronto, Ontario at the Sportsman Show. Paid over $1000 for 3 pieces.

It worked great in the beginning. Got about two years of easy, no hassle cleaning. After about two years however, small pitting began to show up on the surface of the frying pans. I fried some macaroni and cheese in the pan and could not get the food out of the small pits on the surface, no matter how hard I scrubbed. Although the coating did not wear through like it does on cheaper pans, the roughness that the coating developed after two years, made cleaning more difficult than when new.

I learned a lesson the expensive way. I will not buy the titanium cookware again unless it is being sold close to the price of cheaper pans which can be thrown out after two or three years. For now I will go to Walmart and buy coated pans and throw them to be recycled at the scrap yard.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've read a report (http://www.naturalnews.com/021059.html) that Swiss Diamond cookware is coated with diamond dust embedded in PTFE - Teflon is Dupont's brand name for PTFE. PTFE is very bad for the environment and is reported to be carcinogenic.

Woll from Germany appears to be titanium dust embedded in PTFE (http://www.woll-cookware.com/mediathek/defaultScripts/PHP/index.php?c=/export/English/doc/98.html&sn=NAV_2-2_S&img1=411.gif&sel=2&lang=4), but I've emailed them to be sure.

Other manufacturers all seem to be making coated cookware. Of course, what I want is titanium with heavy aluminum clad to the outside - no coatings.

Comments?

As I get more answers I'll post more info.
Back to top
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PFTE aka Teflon has a long track record of approvals for food and medical devices/implants in USA and multiple other countries.

PFOA - and similar compounds - used in the manufacture of PFTE are not such good actors.

the question is how much PFOA remains in PTFE - which could pose danger to humans.

the question was investigated by EPA stemming from petitions from various environmental groups - the upshot being the petition were denied based on the actual science that low to no detectable levels of PFOA were found in cookware. I've seen data from UK and Sweden which reached similar conclusions - no PFOA compounds detectable in PFTE finished products.

this article recaps PFOA exposure, with sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfluorooctanoic_acid

microwave popcorn? bad PFOA actor.
PFTE pan? not a significant source of exposure.

PFTE aka Teflon does break down when over-heated. somewhere in the 500-600'F range. not difficult to achieve on a stove top. in a roomy kitchen, not too likely to affect a mammal, but birds are much more sensitive to the over-heating chemical breakdown and multiple instances of pet bird death have been reported on exposure to over-heated PFTE. so if you have pet birds, avoiding PFTE would be a wise action - simply because kitchen accidents do happen - not because PFTE is inherently unsafe.

the competing non-stick technologies are
- silicone based - works for bakeware, not especially well suited for stovetop
- polyester based
- ceramic based

consumer reviews on the alternatives are mixed. if I had to summarize they fall into two categories:

"I bought this last week and it's wonderful . . "
"I've been using it for a year and after x months it turned into a glue pan"
your mileage may vary . . .

the Woll site shows the three layer coating thickness to be 80 microns thick - takes a thousand microns to make a millimeter - or a little over 0.003 inches thick. seems unlikely to be PFTE at that thickness.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Tools, Equipment, and Gadgets All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group