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Best Ever Steak, slow cooked

 
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urbangriller



Joined: 25 Apr 2009
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 12:45 am    Post subject: Best Ever Steak, slow cooked Reply with quote

I should probably post this as a Beef Recipe as well as an important technique, this is a lesson I teach at BBQ School, beef cooked like this is to die for!

This lesson uses a Rack of Beef to illustrate the importance of internal temperature or "Doneness" and how it can be used do guarantee results.
In this recipe the meat is not permitted to rise above 66 degrees Celsius at any stage in the cooking process, the premise being that at temperatures above 66 C (151 F) the juices inside the cells expand to the point that the cell wall breaks and the juice is dispersed through the meat.
This recipe is cooked over 7 hours using only the heat from 6 Heat Beads at any given time, the Idea is to keep the cooking chamber at the same temperature as you want the final result (in this case Medium Well Done: 66 C (151 F)).

First light 6 Heat Beads in your favourite BBQ, then wait till they have a nice white powdery covering of ash, this means they are ready for cooking as the petro-chemicals have been driven off.





Place your meat on the grill and brown it with a blowtorch to develop colour and taste through "caramelisation" otherwise known as the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction occurs at 150 C (300 F) and with such a low cooking temperature the meat will not brown without the help of a blowtorch.





Close the lid, check the cooking chamber temperature and come back in an hour.



After three hours check the cooking chamber temperature and the beef, you will most likely need to add a couple more Heat Beads, I use Beads leftover from previous cooking sessions as they have no petro-chemicals and will re-ignite easily when in contact with the already lit ones, this is a good time to add some wood chunks for added smoke flavour.






After 7 hours check the internal temperature of the beef, it should be ready to serve. At this point you could hold the meat at serving temperature in the cooking chamber for another four hours or so without a perceivable loss of moisture or quality when served. In addition the meat has been heated evenly and not to the point where the cells rupture, so there is no need to let it rest before serving.



Here I have brought the meat straight to the table and cut it without resting. You can see I have lost a minimum of the juices, you can also see the structure of the meat is preserved and the cook is even across the cut. Remember this is cooked to Medium Well Done! If we got to this internal temperature by "normal" cooking in a hot chamber the outside of the meat would be dry and stringy and the inside grey, dry and to my mind over cooked (I like mine rare).




Here is what was left in the BBQ the next day and what juices were lost in the carving.




Sometimes I'll cut it into inch thick slices and quickly sear each side before serving.

Cheers
Chris
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savorytv



Joined: 18 Aug 2009
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Tue Aug 18, 2009 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent tutorial and the end result looks amazing! With meat, grilling, AND a blowtorch being involved, my boyfriend will be all over this!
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danicamoore



Joined: 16 Sep 2009
Posts: 58
Location: Illinois

PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 2:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

pretty good to me. but as i look at those pictures. it was rare right? so you can't make it more on medium rare? or well done? i guess it would be much more tastier.
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