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Kitchen Notes: Making Butter
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natalie
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2005 6:32 pm    Post subject: soymilk Reply with quote

i'd love to try this with soymilk. what would you suggest i add to thicken it? some sort of baking powder/soda? corn starch? i'll definately add lemon juice to sour it. soy milk is about as thick as skim milk.
thanks!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2005 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Butter is the concentration of fat from milk. You can't make butter with soymilk.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2005 1:28 am    Post subject: marbles Reply with quote

Quote:
My guess is that the marble helps agitate the cream while you shake it. It might reduce your shaking time - or it might not make a noticable difference (or a bad shake may break the mason jar...)


The marble was more of an auditory clue that butter was forming, as I recall. Shake until you can't hear it rattle, and you've got butter.
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heyam
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 8:29 am    Post subject: making chedder cheese at home Reply with quote

please learn me how to make chedder cheese at home with simple way
thank you very much
heyam

my email:
heyam_1974@yahoo.com
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smilesalot
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 4:51 pm    Post subject: Another experiment Reply with quote

What is the half life of butter vs margarine? I remember reading in a magazine article of a Health food store owner trying an experiment, he set out a cube of butter on a plate and on another plate a cube of margarine. He stated within weeks the butter was eaten/decomposed and disappeared but the margarine he left out for 6 months without anything happening to it, event the insects and rodents wouldn't touch it. He then went on to challenge any reader to do the same. I liked his challenge a test anybody can do and see.
Ive always thought the things healthiest for you will go bad quickly, and those that stay aren't so nutritious. I like your statement that butter is not bad for you, another option you didn't mention is mixing some other oil with the butter to increase other variations of fatty acids but yet have the butter taste and texture. Some examples I have tried are Grapeseed oil, Olive oil and Rice bran oil, each of these I have added without changing the taste of the butter dramatically.

smilesalot@mindspring.com
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speleomike
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:42 pm    Post subject: ultra homogneized cream Reply with quote

I can say, without a doubt, ultra h. cream will not work for making butter. I thought it would be cool to show my 8 year old daughter how to make butter so I bought "heavy cream" at the grocery store for something to do on a Saturday. I had made it a couple of times as a child and always thought it was neat. After 30 minutes (the limit of my patience/arm strength) of us vigorously shaking it in a jar not a drop of butter. The "make butter" experiment turned into the recovery experiment of making whipped cream. I must say after shaking so long it turned into great whipped cream in less than 2 minutes of whisking. Don't know what I'm going to do with the 1/2+ gallon it turned into though...
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hockeymom
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 4:44 am    Post subject: making butter Reply with quote

I just did the "marble in a tupperware" method of making butter with my two boys while watching the Broncos beat the Patriots. Woooooo-hoooooo! We did not shake vigorously, just consistently for about 45 min. to an hour. My husband was taking a turn and said, "hmmmm, it actually seems like it got thinner." We looked and there were five big round globs of yellow butter floating in buttermilk! Yea! Then we tried the mixer method and never did get butter. I actually think it did change, but instead of pouring the buttermilk off, we ended up whipping it into the butter. Oh well. I like the marble method better. This was ultra pasteurized grocery store heavy cream.
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scottwhitenyc
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2006 10:09 pm    Post subject: ultra-parturized heavy cream works Reply with quote

I just completed my first attempt at butter making. I took a 2-cup Tupperware container, filled with about 3/4 cup of heavy cream, ultra pasturized. There is no mention of ultra homegenized on the container. 1 tbsp has 5g of total fat. After about 10 minutes of vigorous shaking it turned to whipped cream (I peeked) and I couldn't hear liquid sloshing anymore. I kept shaking hard and began hearing some sloshing and then 'boom' I could tell there was a big chunk of butter surrounded my buttermilk. I shook a bit longer just to be sure. Opened, and there was a big ball of butter sitting in buttermilk (with some creative shaking you can help shape it with your shaking). Washed the butter in cold water, added a good pinch of salt, and it was perfect! Total time was about 15 minutes. I've had better store bought butter, but I've also had this cream in my fridge for a couple of weeks, it expires in about 3 weeks. My next attempt will be with the freshest cream I can get my hands on. Best of luck with your attempt!
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zed
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2006 5:52 pm    Post subject: buying cream Reply with quote

here is a great idea check the freezer section of a discount store (in SLC we have Market Square) i buy frozen outdated cream (it was frozen on the final retail date) its $1.40 to 2.00 per gallon depending on the day) I buy it in pints and quarts, i find that 1 gallon of heavy whipping cream yeilds 3.5 to 4 lbs of butter, also try contacting your local dairy company about buying outdated heavy cream, i find that it is good for a while past the expiration (30-60)days
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Cat H
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:24 am    Post subject: carageenan Reply with quote

I made butter tonight in my kitchenaid mixer and inadvertantly used whipping cream with carageenan in it. It did finally turn into beautiful butter, but it took a long time - over 10 minutes on the highest setting, which is a lot of mixing in a cuisinart. It wouldn't be do-able in a mason jar, but if you couldn't find anything else at the store and wanted to try it, it will eventually work. My kids were impressed.
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hvccook
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can buy raw milk at Whole Foods Market here in California - Would I be able to make that into butter? Would I need to scoop the cream off of the top and use that, or just leave some of the raw milk out at room temperature for 12 hours? Thanks!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1617
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2006 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hvccook wrote:
I can buy raw milk at Whole Foods Market here in California - Would I be able to make that into butter? Would I need to scoop the cream off of the top and use that, or just leave some of the raw milk out at room temperature for 12 hours? Thanks!

In my opinion, making butter from milk is too long of a process to be worth it. You'll need to let the cream rise, skim it, and let the collected cream sit for about a day. Drain the liquid and whip it for a bit (thirty minutes or more) and let sit. Drain and repeat until the cream starts to clump up and form butter.
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moonshadow
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 10:44 pm    Post subject: Butter making Reply with quote

Does anyone remember squishing a plastic bag with white vegetable fat and a yellow plastic capsule to make an ersatz butter during WW11? Butter making using real cream sounds so much more civilized! Love your Web Site!
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm surprised people say store cream won't work.

I just bought a carton of 500ml 35% whipping creme, regular stuff, put it in a bowl, turned on my mixer, followed these instructions, and wow I now have fresh yummy butter!

I won't buy butter again. Reason? For some reason here in Montreal whipped butter is almost impossible to find. I love whipped butter. This stuff is great. I did find that it did not turn yellowish at all, but other than that, no difference. Good description and instructions!
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How does heavy whipping cream turn into butter ;)
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