Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Recipe File: Beef Stroganoff
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Luke Grant
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2005 2:58 am    Post subject: Add some flavour Reply with quote

Hi guys,

I grew up in a Russian/Australian family and this is how we make strogonough.

With your 1cup sour cream, use garlic (2 - 3 cloves), 1/4cup tomato paste and 3tbsp lemon juice. This will add a much richer flavor.....maybe too much flavor for the American palette
Back to top
luba
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:28 pm    Post subject: Re: Beef Stroganoff Sour Cream Substitute Reply with quote

Please never use Kefir or plain yogurt as a substitute of the sour cream.
It is very hard to find a good sour cream in USA (by the way I am Russian) and Kefir or yogurt will ruin everything. That is not about fat, cholesterol or calories, the food that we eat should taste good and in order to enjoy it never try to calculate calories or think about fat.
Back to top
John
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 1:01 am    Post subject: Deglazing? Reply with quote

I made this tonight and my wife and I loved it.

In the flow chart you have "deglazing" after cooking the onions. This usually requires adding a liquid. The text above does not mention this, but does talk about scraping the fond. Are these equivalent terms/processes?
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 6:28 am    Post subject: Re: Deglazing? Reply with quote

John wrote:
In the flow chart you have "deglazing" after cooking the onions. This usually requires adding a liquid. The text above does not mention this, but does talk about scraping the fond. Are these equivalent terms/processes?


Yes, deglazing requires liquid. In the case of this recipe, the onions provide the liquid as they cook down. The water they release is more than enough to loosen up the fond on the pan.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
robin
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2006 2:23 pm    Post subject: beef stroganof Reply with quote

Is there something that can be used to substitute sour cream? I live in Brazil now and have never seen any. if you add a little lime (no lemons here that I've found) to a canned cream would that work?
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2006 5:01 pm    Post subject: Re: beef stroganof Reply with quote

robin wrote:
Is there something that can be used to substitute sour cream? I live in Brazil now and have never seen any. if you add a little lime (no lemons here that I've found) to a canned cream would that work?

I'm not sure what canned cream is, but using a one to one substitution with plain yogurt should yield good results.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Beverly13Anderson
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2006 9:35 pm    Post subject: Beef Stroganoff Recipe Reply with quote

My husband tells me that he likes Beef Stroganoff. I went looking for recipes and found several. I read them to him and he told me that the Beef Stroganoff he remembers had some type of cheese (perhaps swiss). I am open for suggestions. Thanks!
Back to top
andycwb



Joined: 04 Feb 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Feb 04, 2006 4:44 pm    Post subject: Re: it's a heart attack! Reply with quote

TheLoneCabbage wrote:
1.5lb of beef, butter, sour cream...
I can feel my arteries hardening now. I'm sure it's a classic recipie but yeech!!

is there any way of doing this without risking a coranary?


Weightwatchers has variations on this recipe (which I can't post here without infringing their copyright). Essentially, the main variation is to stir in creme fraiche once the rest of the ingredients are cooked and removed from the heat. If you want to keep the points down (or cholesterol), you can also do a chicken stroganoff - not as good, but not bad, either.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Miss_Eva
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2006 3:39 pm    Post subject: Add Garlic Reply with quote

I always add garlic to this dish when I make it. It especially tastes good if you roast the garlic first, crush it up and add to the onions and mushrooms when you are sauteeing. As far as having a coronary goes, the way I see it, I'm going to die anyway and I'm not going without tasting beef stroganoff, Turtle cheesecake or Chunky Monkey ice cream.
Back to top
Valerie
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2006 9:50 pm    Post subject: Re: No Sour Cream Reply with quote

Quote:
Is there something that can be used to substitute sour cream? I live in Brazil now and have never seen any. if you add a little lime (no lemons here that I've found) to a canned cream would that work?


Robin- I live in Brazil too. You're right- creme de leite with some limão makes a pretty decent substitute for sour cream. Not quite as thick, but it's pretty good . It's what's used in the Brazilian version of stroganoff (which is completely different than anything posted so far). Anyway, FYI, if you want a sour cream substitute for making dips or putting on Mexican food, try creme de leite, cream cheese and limão. It takes a little work to get the balance right, but it's pretty acceptable.
Back to top
Jörg



Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2006 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mmm. I made this tonight. Excellent dish. I thought the dill was a bit too strong, but it turned out I just needed a bit more salt. The salt really brought out the rest of the flavors and balanced things nicely.

I disagree that the sauce is so powerful that there's no need to drench the noodles in it. I think it's less visually appealing to toss the noodles with the sauce, but I think it'll taste better. Some of the noodles just seemed too dry, and honestly, the sauce isn't that strong. It's fairly rich, but it's not at all overpowering.


Oh, and I used chuck tender roast for the beef. I sliced it crossways against the grain pretty thin (thickest was probably a quarter of an inch or a little more, thinnest was nearly transparent, average was somewhere toward the thinner side, but opaque) and beat it with the textured side of the mallet. Turned out tasty and tender.

Overall, I loved it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
roosa
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 1:49 pm    Post subject: dillmeat not stroganoff Reply with quote

Stroganoff is not stroganoff without pickled cucumber. Similar stews have been cooked for centuries in russia (and finland) and the pickled cucumber is what makes it stroganoff. The recepie you wrote is called dillmeat in finland and quite common but has nothing to do with stroganoff. It should also stew a lot longer. 1 hour minimum.
Back to top
Ivan
Guest





PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2006 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice dish, but the recipe doesn't seem original to me. I have searched through many russian cooking sites and the original recipe is as follows (Luke Grant has mentioned it above):

Cut meat as suggested in the recipe.
Cut onions in rings (or half-rings)
If you want to use mushrooms, they should be fried independently (I do not use mushrooms at all)

Take a skillet, melt butter and add oil (1:1). You need quite a lot, because it should cover the onions. Put onions to cover the bottom of the skillet (that's why we needed rings). Put meat onto the onions, so that it doesn't touch the skillet! Do not mix! Add salt, pepper, spices, close the skillet. Allow it to stew on the high flame for 5-7 minutes until the meat is brown and (it will not burn don't worry).

Now you can stir it, add sour creme (1 cup), tomato sauce (1 tablespoon) or ketchup, garlick, mustard (2-3 teespoons) and mushrooms (if you prepared them). Stir well and close again. It should simmer for 15-30 minutes depending on the meat. It is ready when the meat is soft and you almost cannot see the onions.

Before serving add some lemon juice.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find all these variations on Beef Stroganof facinating. The version I grew up with has no dill or mustard, but Worcestershire sauce for seasoning.

I know stroganof is usually served over noodles, but I 've also served it over rice or couscous, with couscous being my prefered method.

For those who wanted to replace the beef, you can make an excellent mushroom stroganof if you use a nice variety of mushrooms instead.
Back to top
PD
Guest





PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2006 2:15 am    Post subject: Excellent stroganoff Reply with quote

Experienced a brainfart -- okay, maybe it was due to a few beers and six dogs snaking around me while cooking -- but I forgot the beef broth step. However, when I sauteed the beef, I left two or three small oddly shaped pieces in the pan so that I might get a bit more beef flavor while cooking the onions and mushrooms. These were "throwaway" bits of beef for the sake of the sauce. I hope their flavor helped compensate for my lack of broth. (Sure wondered why that can of broth was just sitting there on my counter -- a smug grin on it's tin face). I tend to favor more spices in recipes than are usually called for -- I think we Americans like our foods too bland -- so I actually bumped up the bit of dill. (Dill + beef = exquisite taste sensation... I'm sure there's a mathematical/scientific formula for that somewhere). Didn't have cognac (cheap date that I am) so I used a bit of cooking sherry. Very nice version of stroganoff that's easy to prepare and is a wonderful comfort food. I will make it properly next time (out of curiousity more than anything now), but I was very pleased with what I had created sans-broth anyway. Bon appetite friends! And for those that misguidedly fixate on cholesteral/sat fats... just remember all the women that skipped dessert after dinner on the Titanic... you only live once, so enjoy life's pleasures.
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 2 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You can delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group