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Recipe File

Condensed Milk Fudge

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Fudge is a soft, finely grained (almost gritty) candy made from sugar syrup, cream, and butter. Making sure the sugar forms small fine crystals is essential to producing the right texture. Most traditional fudge recipes require patience, timing, and quick action to produce the right sized crystals. This recipe produces a confection that looks like fudge and tastes like fudge, but without the effort of making fudge from a sugar syrup.

The only ingredients you need for this recipe are one pound of chocolate chips (both semi-sweet and dark work well), 4 Tbs. butter, and a 14 ounce (net weight) can of sweetened condensed milk (not evaporated milk). The chocolate chips can be replaced or blended with peanut butter chips for to make peanut butter fudge or chocolate-peanut fudge. (If you like peanut butter swirls, you'll need to melt the peanut butter chips separately and swirl them in later.) Note that one pound of chocolate chips is the same as three cups of chocolate chips - not two.


This recipe is so easy, you can even do it in the microwave oven. Use a microwave oven safe bowl and microwave until the chocolate is glistening and begins to melt (be careful not to overheat in the microwave or the chocolate will burn). For the purposes of this article, I'll be using a bain-marie. Heating chocolate indirectly over the gentle heat of steam will make it more difficult to overheat.

Throw the butter and chocolate chips into a medium metal bowl or double boiler. Pour the sweetened condensed milk on top.


Fill a small pot with about an inch of water and bring it to a boil. Once it begins to boil, reduce the heat so the water is barely simmering.

Place the metal bowl on top of the pot to make a bain-marie. (If you have a double boiler, by all means, use it instead.) Make sure the bottom of the bowl is suspended above the water level itself (it's best to check this when you first start bringing the water to a boil since working with cool water and an empty bowl is easier than steaming water and a boil filled with two pounds of fudge ingredients.) Make sure the water is gently releasing steam - accidentally allowing too much moisture to settle on your chocolate could cause it to seize resulting in clumping. In my experience, this particular recipe is fairly forgiving, so don't worry too much.


While the ingredients are gently heating, butter an 8 in. square baking dish. I should mention a couple of tips here that may help with unmolding the fudge after it has set. Once the pan is buttered, lay two sheets of plastic wrap or parchment paper down onto the buttered surface. The sheets should be longer than the container (a little more than twelve inches should be fine) and should be laid down perpendicular to each other. The butter will help keep the plastic wrap in place while you pour the fudge and after the fudge is set, you can use the ends that overflow the container to lift out the fudge. In the following pictures, I just buttered the baking pan and had to work at it a little to unmold the fudge one section at a time.


After a few minutes over the heat, start mixing the melting chocolate together with the melting butter. Keep alternating between mixing and heating until all the ingredients are blended together (use your spatula to scape down the sides of the bowl at least once). At this point, if you want to add fancy components (like chopped walnuts, peanut butter for swirling, etc.) do so.


Pour the fudge into the baking dish. Use a spatula to scrape the bowl clean.


Level the fudge with your spatula.


I don't like putting hot items into my refrigerator, so I like to use an aluminum half sheet pan as a heat sink. Pour a little cold water into the pan and place the fudge in the middle of the pan. A few ice cubes will help keep the aluminum cool as it takes on heat from the bottom of the baking pan. After about ten minutes, slip the fudge into the refrigerator for chilling and setting.


Once the fudge has set, about two hours, cut into squares.



This is a fun recipe to play with. Additional ingredients can be melted in or mixed in before pouring. Two different fudges (like chocolate and peanut butter or dark chocolate and white chocolate) can be made and poured on top of each other to produce different effects (try pouring on a top layer before the bottom layer fully sets).


Absurdly Easy Chocolate Fudge (makes 16 2-in. squares)
16 oz. (450 g) chocolate chipscombinemeltmixpour into moldchill to set
4 Tbs. (57 g) butter
14 oz. (396 g) can sweetened condensed milk


Absurdly Easy Peanut Butter Fudge (makes 16 2-in. squares)
16 oz. (450 g) peanut butter chipscombinemeltmixpour into moldchill to set
4 Tbs. (57 g) butter
14 oz. (396 g) can sweetened condensed milk

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Written by Michael Chu
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140 comments on Condensed Milk Fudge:(Post a comment)

On August 29, 2005 at 08:57 PM, Alice (guest) said...
Wow, this looks really simple and lovely! Fudge was always that luxurious chocolate treat I got in small quaint vacation spots with lots of bed & breakfasts. Maybe I'll make this recipe at home one of these days & pretend to be on vacation...


On August 29, 2005 at 08:58 PM, Danger Stevens (guest) said...
What an excellent recipe!

Thank you so much for the recipe charts - they're really wonderful.

- Danger Stevens


On August 29, 2005 at 08:58 PM, an anonymous reader said...
Can be made with even less fuss in a glass bowl in the microwave. Partially melt chocolate and butter in large glass mixing bowl in microwave. Remove and stir until completely melted. Stir in condensed milk (and optional nuts or other fancies); pour into baking dish lined with plastic wrap. Cover with more plastic wrap. Refrigerate or chill to set. Peel off plastic wrap and cut into squares. Done this way the recipe is (almost) totally little-kid-safe as no hot water, hot pans, or stoves are involved.


On August 29, 2005 at 08:59 PM, Michael Chu said...
re: microwaving

My only reservation about microwaving is that you need to be careful not to burn the chocolate. As the last anonymous commenter mentioned, only heat until the chocolate is partially melted and mix until the rest is melted through residual heat. Often, this will involve 10-15 second microwave sessions and then a quick check to see if the chips have begun to glisten.

Also, please use a microwave safe bowl - not all glass bowls are microwave safe. Microwave safe glass bowls are manufacturered in such a way as to guarantee no air bubbles are trapped in the glass. Regular glass bowls may crack or even shatter under the right circumstances. The chances are good that most of your glassware at home is microwave safe, but it can be a nasty surprise when you accidentally microwave souvenir glassware.


On August 29, 2005 at 08:59 PM, an anonymous reader said...
mmm marvelous, scientific simple and delicious


On August 29, 2005 at 09:02 PM, an anonymous reader said...
I love making fudge this way, it's so simple. An alternate version is to use 12 oz semi-sweet chocolate chips, 1 14 oz can condensed milk, and 1 tsp vanilla. Melt chocolate, add condensed milk, stir in vanilla. Add optional nuts, butterscotch chips, cherries, etc. Then pour into pan and cool. mmmmmmm.

Really enjoy your site, thanks for all the cooking tips and recipe charts -- so helpful!


On August 29, 2005 at 09:03 PM, an anonymous reader said...
http://www.ismckenzie.com/recipelog/index.php/archives/category/general/

entry for 31 march


On August 29, 2005 at 09:05 PM, Colin (guest) said...
Hi Michael, I really like your site even though I'm not much of an engineer myself.

Is a bain-marie the same as a double boiler? I always thought that a bain-marie is a water bath, meaning the container holding the ingredients has to be sitting in the water.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:05 PM, Michael Chu said...
Colin wrote:
Hi Michael, I really like your site even though I'm not much of an engineer myself.

Is a bain-marie the same as a double boiler? I always thought that a bain-marie is a water bath, meaning the container holding the ingredients has to be sitting in the water.

For the purposes of this application, a bain marie and a double boiler perform the same action - gentle heating over water. When working with chocolate, it is important to not have the bowl touch the water since that will transmit heat faster than only steam heating. In both cases, it is still considered a bain marie (bowl in water, bowl over water).

As a side note - there are companies that make "double boilers" that can be set so you can partially submerge the top layer pot into the water in the second pot as well as using them in the traditional double boiler (elevated) configuration.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:06 PM, Sweetnicks (guest) said...
The Absurdly Easy Peanut Butter Fudge is going to be an impossible recipe to stay away - so much for Weight Watchers! :)


On August 29, 2005 at 09:06 PM, nadiarosina (guest) said...
I thought it was delicious, but more a hybrid of truffle and fudge. Maybe i'll chill it longer. Thanks.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:07 PM, gingerbear (guest) said...
HI mike, this is a cool blog. I'm an engineer myself and I really enjoy cooking. Thinking of switching over to become a chef. Is this just a hobby for you or are u actually into professional cooking, by any chance?


On August 29, 2005 at 09:08 PM, an anonymous reader said...
WISH YOU WOULD MAKE IT EASIER TO GET RECIPE THIS SOUNDS GREAT WILL MAKE IT. SUSAN H


On August 29, 2005 at 09:08 PM, cb (guest) said...
haha! you said, "heat sink". that's hot. no pun intended.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:08 PM, Athryn (guest) said...
Mmmmmmmm, this looks good.

That's weird though, I never remember my mom having any trouble making fudge. I'll ask her what she does.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:08 PM, Tiger Spot (guest) said...
Oh man. My batch just went in the fridge, and I'm already impressed. I don't know how the texture's going to turn out, but the flavor is very nice.

I just melted everything in a pot over low heat, and it did fine.

I'm so glad I got to try one of your recipes -- I love the way they're laid out, but as a vegetarian there aren't too many up here I can actually eat.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:09 PM, Tiger Spot (guest) said...
Later report: The fudge is totally awesome. Buttering the pan and then putting down plastic wrap didn't work -- when I tried to lift the fudge out, the plastice wrap just tore. However, once I'd trimmed off a side of the fudge and levered it out of the pan, I was able to pry the rest up and peel off the plastic.

I will go have some more fudge now. Mm, fudge.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:09 PM, Sasha (guest) said...
I found that after being in the fridge, the fudge was easy to pry off. It may have just been that I happened to wait a good amount of time before cutting/prying the half that I took out first. (about 1 hour)

--S


On August 29, 2005 at 09:09 PM, oldmess (guest) said...
Instead of plastic wrap, use parchment paper. It'll come of cleaner.

Also, a dash of cayenne pepper really enhances the flavor.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:10 PM, an anonymous reader said...
RFC About adding foaming to recipe

Rationale: substances under the form of foam carry a lot of air. Air is 100% fat-free .Foamy foods give the sensation of satiated hunger faster and more efficiently then other non foamy foods , yet deliver less calories per serving.

So to keep a long RFC short..what about foam geeks giving us some hint on how to turn the recipe into a nice spongy mass that will satiate our hunger without exploding our liver like the unmodified recipe will do ?


On August 29, 2005 at 09:10 PM, Dave R. (guest) said...
Great recipe--easy way to impress your friends. I found that using PAM or Crisco on the pan works just as well before you put down plastic wrap, and has no effect on the taste, of course.

Love the site, even though I'm a lawyer-in-training, not an engineer.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:11 PM, pena (guest) said...
hmmmm! add a little of wiskey, pour over raisins or biscuit crumbles.

but... where are the porous bubbles recipe, c'mon prop'heads!


On August 29, 2005 at 09:11 PM, an anonymous reader said...
How about halving the recipe, and folding in some rice crispies before putting it into the pan? Don't shoot me if this doesn't work - I haven't tried it. :)


On August 29, 2005 at 09:11 PM, an anonymous reader said...
I halved the recipe and it turned out too soft. Can't actually cut it properly as it is so soft it sticks to the knife so much!


On August 29, 2005 at 09:12 PM, Michael Chu said...
Anonymous wrote:
I halved the recipe and it turned out too soft. Can't actually cut it properly as it is so soft it sticks to the knife so much!

Sounds like the fudge hasn't set yet. How long did you have it in the refrigerator? Although I recommend at least two hours, sometimes it takes longer for the fudge to set (depending on the shape and material of your container).

Once set, the fudge can be cut at cold or room temperatures without a problem.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:12 PM, an anonymous reader said...
After cutting the fudge you can put the baking dish in hot water, it'll melt the butter and make removing the cubes easier.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:12 PM, ed (guest) said...
ohhh its fudge for god sake! havent u ladies got anything better to do then discuss cutting fudge?

pur-loise.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:13 PM, Alexandra (guest) said...
Okay, I have to agree with Ed, haven't u guys got anything better to do than discuss fudge and all it's characteristics for fuck sakes? Jeez, get a life!! I'm only on here to get a recipe not discuss it, but when I seen all those gay as comments, I just couldn't resist!! HAHA! HAVE FUN!


On August 29, 2005 at 09:13 PM, an anonymous reader said...
I make this fudge every Christmas for years, I also make a second version with white chocolate such as Ghiradelli's. My question to the forum is, does this fudge need to be refrigerated, will it spoil if left out at room temperature.


On August 29, 2005 at 09:13 PM, Michael Chu said...
Anonymous wrote:
I make this fudge every Christmas for years, I also make a second version with white chocolate such as Ghiradelli's. My question to the forum is, does this fudge need to be refrigerated, will it spoil if left out at room temperature.

If the environment isn't humid and room temperature for you isn't too much over 70°F, then the fudge should be able to keep at room temperature for a few weeks.

Where I live, in the summer, the fudge softens too much to keep out of the refrigerator.


On September 01, 2005 at 06:43 AM, Pat in Texas (guest) said...
Subject: Even Easier Fudge
This is a good fudge, but there's an even easier virtually foolproof method I learned last year. It's nearly infinitely variable, too.

Butter or no-stick spray the 8X8 pan as in the original recipe, using parchment paper for easiest removal.

Next, simply take one 11 or 12 oz bag of chocolate chips or any other flavor you desire, and melt in the microwave or as as in the condensed milk recipe. I generally use a one quart pyrex measuring cup and the microwave.
Next. stir in one can of ready to spread chocolate icing. (You can use a dark chocolate for the most intense flavor with dark chocolate chips, use regular chocolate or milk chocolate frosting for variation.) Don't use the "fluffy" or pourable cans or the german chocolate type with nuts and coconut.

Mix in thoroughly and then add nuts or other goodies. A teaspoon of vanilla is good, too. Never add vanilla or any liquid to the melted chips until the icing is incorporated-it will seize them up. Spread in the prepared pan and chill until set. Stores fine at room temperature after setting.

Here's the beauty of this one-use any flavor of chips and icing combination that strikes your fancy. Use white chocolate chips and vanilla icing with red and gren candied cherries for Christmas. Another good "white" combo is with coconut and macadamia nuts. Use vanilla icing with peanut butter, caramel or strawberry icing for unusual fudges. My speciality is butterscotch chips with caramel icing, toasted pecans and vanilla and a touch of cinnamon. With minimal supervision, even little kids can make flawless fudge this way.

Enjoy!

Pat


On September 01, 2005 at 07:12 PM, April (guest) said...
Subject: Substitute
I love the flavor of cocoa; do you have any tips on how to substitue cocoa powder?


On September 01, 2005 at 08:26 PM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: Substitute
April wrote:
I love the flavor of cocoa; do you have any tips on how to substitue cocoa powder?

One strategy is simply use darker chocolate to give you that strong cocoa flavor. It doesn't have to be chocolate chips, any form of chocolate that you can melt in with the other two ingredients should work.


On January 06, 2006 at 04:25 AM, an anonymous reader said...
B E A UTIFUL Fudge....thanks for the great recipe...this will no doubt be a standard in our house now. I added chopped honey roasted macadamia nuts to one I made yesterday and it was all gone in 20 minutes :shock: Thanks Again!!


On January 20, 2006 at 02:07 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Is there a way to substituted evaporated milk for the sweetened condensed milk?


On January 20, 2006 at 02:31 AM, Michael Chu said...
Anonymous wrote:
Is there a way to substituted evaporated milk for the sweetened condensed milk?

I haven't done this myself, but I've read that if you bring 1 cup (8 oz. or 235 mL) evaporated milk to a simmer and add 1-1/4 cup (125 g) sugar and stir until the sugar has fully dissolved, it is a good approximate of sweetened condensed milk.


On January 20, 2006 at 04:16 PM, livinginmexico (guest) said...
Subject: question
I can't get chocolate chips here in Mexico. I really would like to make this fudge, anyone know how much lets say chocolate bars (it would be 70%) would I have to use? They are rather expenisive here and I bring them back from the US when I visit or have to buy them here at $4.00 per smaller bar..about 2 servings and are in either grams or oz bars, usually grams. I get confused with metric and the british systems.

Thanks for advice. :unsure:
Laura


On January 20, 2006 at 06:31 PM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: question
livinginmexico wrote:
I can't get chocolate chips here in Mexico. I really would like to make this fudge, anyone know how much lets say chocolate bars (it would be 70%) would I have to use?

If you don't have chocolate chips, then just use 450 g of chocolate that's been chopped into small chunks.


On March 28, 2006 at 04:34 PM, Onyx (guest) said...
Subject: The best fudge
I have been making this fudge for years. I find I am only limited by the variety of chocolate chips that I can find. One year I found chocolate raspberry chips, it was superb. I will warn against using the cinnamon chips if you can find them. It smelled great like the center ofa cinnabon cinnamon roll, was too rich for even my taste. I also used the mint chips. In my opinion this is truely a no fail fudge.

One can also use some of the flavored dipping chocolate wafers mixed with regular chocolate for some exotic flavors.


On June 24, 2006 at 12:27 AM, Eliz (guest) said...
Subject: question about powdered unsweetened cocoa
Hi, Michael!
I like your site. It helps me to be more exact in my cooking and understand the processes that go into consistent results.

I have a question about your fudge recipe. I live in an area where real chocolate chips are very expensive and rare, and the compound (barely any chocolate in them) ones are common (and very yucky), and I have had to bring real ones back from the States when I visit, in suitcases, in order to have "real" chocolate chip cookies. Consequently, I do not use these chips when I don't have to. I manage and hoard them like gold. So could I substitute some of the chips in this recipe? If so, what would I use? A chocolate bar or cocoa? What components would you tweak in order to accommodate this substitution?
Thanks!


On June 24, 2006 at 08:25 PM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: question about powdered unsweetened cocoa
Eliz wrote:
Consequently, I do not use these chips when I don't have to. I manage and hoard them like gold. So could I substitute some of the chips in this recipe? If so, what would I use? A chocolate bar or cocoa? What components would you tweak in order to accommodate this substitution?
Thanks!

Just use a semi-sweet or dark chocolate bar and chop them up so they melt easily. The chips are used for convenience.


On July 12, 2006 at 07:21 PM, Alexandra said...
Subject: Adding extracts
I wanted to try making this recipe with butterscotch chips and rum extract. Do you think the extract will make the mixture seize up?


On September 04, 2006 at 10:56 AM, Kiny (guest) said...
Subject: cocoa powder in fudge recipe
I too live in an area where we have no chocolate chips and no good chocolate bars either. I did find cocoa powder though and was wondering if I could use that and how ( and if someone knows how to use it to cover candy.....)

Kiny


On October 30, 2006 at 10:12 PM, peachesncream (guest) said...
Subject: substitute for chocolate chips
Not sure how helpful it is for fudge, but I have had success doing this in other recipes:
Substitute 1 tablespoon plus 1 3/4 teaspoons (9.5 grams) of cocoa, 1 tablespoon plus 1/2 teaspoon (14.5 grams) granulated white sugar, 1 1/2 teaspoons (7 grams) unsalted butter for every ounce (28 grams) of bittersweet or semisweet chocolate.


On November 12, 2006 at 06:14 PM, an anonymous reader said...
I love making fudge this way, but often can't because of guilting the rest of my family. So, for those of you with similar problems, here's a tip:
-instead of using regular sweetened condensed milk, try using the fat-free stuff
(if you can find reduced sugar chocolate, this will help tons as well)
;)


On November 15, 2006 at 01:22 AM, engineer cook (guest) said...
Subject: Clarification on quantities
When shopping for sweetened condensed milk I found it comes in 14 oz (by weight) cans, which comes to only 10.5 fluid oz. I tried the recipe with the 14 oz (by weight) amount and it came out fine, so I think that the 14 fl. oz. specified in the ingredients list is just a typo. Also, I found chocolate (or peanut butter) chips tend to come in 11 oz packages. 3 cups of standard-size chips comes to approx. 1 lb.


On December 09, 2006 at 08:38 PM, an anonymous reader said...
The fudge was delicious, and I'm about to try it with swirled white/milk chocolate chips. My one comment is that it really should be chilled for quite a while, preferably overnight. 2 hours just isn't enough for the heat to fully transfer to the cold reservoir. Er, I mean fridge.


On December 13, 2006 at 03:11 AM, Frendlycat (guest) said...
Subject: Shipping Fudge
I made this fudge for Thanksgiving (with milk chocolate chips, peanut butter chips, and walnuts) and it came out great. I decided to make some to ship in tins to friends/family at Christmas. I have never shipped fudge before, so if anyone has any tips on how to ship it successfully please let me know. I am still making the gift tins, but so far I poured the fudge for two "test tins" right into the decorative tin, which was lined with 2 layers of cling wrap. After it was solid, I took it out of the cling wrap, wrapped the block in a sheet of wax paper (to make it look neater), and then put it back in the tin. I am planning to ship it this way, and hope it doesn't melt! It seems to have worked well so far, and I hope to mail it within the next day or so. In the future I think I will stick with making fudge only for people who leave near me, but I already committed myself this year, so I hope it works out. Again, any comments or advice would be welcome...thank you!


On March 11, 2007 at 03:42 AM, guest (guest) said...
Subject: that's not fudge, it's ganache
Chocolate softened with cream or milk or soft fat isn't an easy way to make fudge. It's ganache, a completely different thing. That's why it's so much easier to get it smooth.

Try rolling this condensed milk ganache into little balls and coating them in cocoa, spices or chocolate, perhaps with a nut or a piece of candied fruit or ginger in the middle, or hollow them out and inject a liquid center...


On April 23, 2007 at 06:58 AM, guest (guest) said...
Subject: variation
i added marshmallows and it is the best fudge i have ever had
mmm....


On June 11, 2007 at 05:18 PM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: RE: that's not fudge, it's ganache
I believe that what separates this from a ganache is the addition of sugar in the sweetened condensed milk.


On July 14, 2007 at 07:43 PM, an anonymous reader said...
I love the taste of this fudge but I live in S. TX and it's hot and humid. My fudge won't set up to the point I can take it out of the fridge and set it on a dish to serve. At room temp one could spread it on a cookie. Is this how it will always be for me?


On July 22, 2007 at 07:50 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: hints for the Aussies re this fudge.
I live in Australia so could only find Sweetened Condensed Milk in 395 gram (net) tins. This turns out to be 300 ml. which turns out to work very well in this recipe. I sent hubby out for the chocolate chips and he came back with Black & Gold brand (decidedly INFERIOR 'compound chocolate' chips). Resulting mix tasted sour. I added 2 heaping tablespoons of light brown sugar to counteract this somewhat sour taste. Worked well. I even added the brown sugar after the fudge mixture was melted, and worked it right into the fudge. No graininess. Lovely fudge!! Thank you for the recipe! (I made it in my 700 watt microwave with short 15 second bursts).


On July 24, 2007 at 05:52 PM, Kansascook (guest) said...
Subject: Another way to prepare fudge
I had a can of sweetened condensed milk and a bag of chocolate chips and was looking for a way to use them when I found this site.

The fudge is really good and extra easy to make.

Instead of putting into a pan and I put it into candy cups. These are parchament paper cups and tin foil cups I had left from another food project.

Put only fudge into them or make a mixture.

I made some fudge only and some I put a little fudge on the bottom and sprinkled in other items like chopped nuts, chopped dried fruit, or spoons of peanut butter. Then I topped them with a little more fudge and put a little of the filling on top to identify them.

They set up super fast when chilled and you can peel off the wrapper cup without any problem.

This would be great in gift baskets!

Thanks for posting it!


On October 27, 2007 at 10:52 AM, jackie (guest) said...
Subject: fudge
Hi, we have trouble finding choc chips where we live so have tried with baking choc - doesn't seem to harden well.... what is it about choc chips that makes it work?
Anything we can use instyead?
Jackie


On October 28, 2007 at 12:53 AM, Jiikyia (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge
I was delighted to find this recipe. I had bought a boxed fudge mix last year around the holidays that contained chocolate chips and condensed milk and you added butter to it. It was so easy. I had written down the basics because I thought it would be cheaper to buy the ingredients separately. I made the fudge several times with success. I somehow lost the list and even though I remembered what to use, I couldn't remember the amounts. I can't find the boxed mix any more. I wanted to bring some fudge to work this next week for Halloween and picked up the ingredients today. I then did an internet search for a recipe using those ingredients and found this recipe!! Thank you.


On November 20, 2007 at 08:14 PM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: Shrotcut for the double boiler
In a heavy bottom pan, pour out the condensed milk and on low heat, stir the milk, add butter in chunks and keep stirring. When butter is completely melted, stir until evenly mixed, and then add Chips (your choice). Stir for 10 -15 seconds, remove from heat. Mix until chips loose their shape, soften and completely melt. It might take some time and effort.
I've made this quick fudge, and did not use double boiler because I was short on time. You learn to handle the chocolate with more practice, so keep trying.

~ FHK


On November 27, 2007 at 03:57 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: to fix too-soft fudge, and also, about cinnamon chips
it's actually really easy to alter the firmness of this fudge recipe, since it's the butter that really gives it the softness.

if it's too soft, then next time, just use less butter. just make sure you give it plenty of time to set up (at least 4 hours for me). if it's still too soft, try using half the butter next time.

my dad actually likes his fudge really really firm, and when i make it for him, i don't put in ANY butter at all. (it turns out really solid, and almost crumbly, but still really good.)

for those of you counting calories, you can use the fat-free condensed milk, unsweetened baking chocolate, and add your personal favorite no-calorie sweetener (like splenda or equal) to make it as sweet as you like. you can also use margarine and low cholesterol spreads like smart choice or i can't believe it's not butter if you want not-super-firm fudge.

about those cinnamon chips. i think it is too much to use JUST cinnamon chips, BUT you can melt them in the microwave and drizzle over the top of regular fudge, and swirl it in with a toothpick, and it turns out nice.

~melly


On November 28, 2007 at 12:16 AM, momcesa (guest) said...
Subject: Mint fudge
HI I made this fudge last Christmas and found many ways to vary it. One of my favorites was the mint fudge. I used dark chocolate chips and added peppermint extract then once it was all melted I added crushed up peppermint candies. Plus there are so many varieties of chips these days so it is easy to make many types.


On December 11, 2007 at 08:46 PM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: What did I do wrong?
This seems like a gloriously easy recipe, but something didn't work. The ingredients didn't combine well. Instead I have globs of chocolate with pools of oil. 8| We did use 60% cocao dark chocolate chips, too much cocao maybe? We used a double boiler, (too hot maybe?), salted sweet cream butter, and the sweetened condensed milk. Any words of wisdom before our second attempt?


On December 16, 2007 at 12:10 AM, lyndy (guest) said...
Subject: microwave Fudge
Two comments for fudge: one, I always use cocoa, never unsweetened chips-too expensive and secondly a 2 minute microwave version:
l lb confectioner sugar
1/2 c. cocoa
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 c. milk
1tbs. vanilla
1/2 c. margarine

in 1 1/2 quart casserole dish stir all ingredients except butter. Once stirred put butter on top and microwave for 2 minutes. stir vigorously until smooth. Blend in nuts if desired. por into desired dish and chill 1 hr in frig--cut into squares . Put in tin and hide it!


On December 19, 2007 at 01:29 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: Fudge is gooey
My fudge didn't set up after more than 12 hours in the fridge. I don't want to use it as a sauce. Is there any way to fix it. Can you reheat it and/or add some ingredient that will make it firm or should I give up and toss it?


On December 27, 2007 at 10:59 PM, Seena (guest) said...
Subject: Addition to fudge
My 13 yo daughter is obsessed with marzipan, dark chocolate, and fleur de sel so this year we made this exact fudge recipe using part semi-sweet and part bittersweet chocolate.
After spreading in the pan we sprinkled it with fleur de sel. It was yummy! We gave some out as gifts and people kept asking where we bought it.
I think any additions make fudge a little more posh.
Happy Holidays!


On January 16, 2008 at 09:13 PM, ves heill (guest) said...
Subject: Great fudge!
Made this last night using the microwave method discussed in the 3rd/4th comments above. I needed to microwave for around 30 seconds before I saw any hint of melting, then micro'd in 10 second bursts with stirring in between, for total microwaving time of around 1min, 20 seconds. I used your posted recipe with the exception that I used 3 TBS of butter instead of 4 (I like a firm fudge), and I added 2 crushed Skor candy bars before pouring into the mold and another 2 crushed Skor bars on top. Fabulous fudge, and so easy! I'll definitely be making this again.


On February 09, 2008 at 02:32 AM, tangela (guest) said...
Quote:
This seems like a gloriously easy recipe, but something didn't work. The ingredients didn't combine well. Instead I have globs of chocolate with pools of oil.


I had this problem too :/ I used Ghirardelli semisweet chocolate chips. If that's relevant. Somehow.

I suspect that it was due to over-mixing. Instead of letting the ingredients sit and warm up for a few minutes, I just started mixing right away.

Also, I didn't really alternate between heating and mixing until nearish the end of the process. I just stirred like crazy in the beginning, reread the recipe, thought "aw man," and then started taking the bowl on and off the heat.

Maybe that was the problem? I think that's when it started clumping and developing little pools of oil. Was I supposed to let it rest for a bit on top of the pot before mixing some more?

I still scooped the fudge into a foil-lined pan [it wasn't really pourable at this point] and let it set. It looked fine after a few hours, only there were disconcerting patches of solid fat on the top. And when I cut it there were teeny little fat deposits dispersed throughout the chocolate. At least it tastes okay :/

I might try again, or buy a candy thermometer and make fudge the more difficult way. I like the crumbly texture of well-made fudge. This was a tad too smooth for my taste.

And so I don't sound completely ungrateful and complain-y: I really do like your site. As other people have mentioned, the pictures are really helpful to get an idea of what the food should look like. Also, the chart format is nifty :] It helps me figure out what I can measure and mix ahead of time. You do not want to know how many times I've smacked my forehead in frustration after mixing all the dry ingredients together for the crust only to realize that the sugar and flour should really go in the curd / what-have-you. Silly me.

/endrambling.


On March 28, 2008 at 04:01 AM, Adrian (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge
I love how simple and delicious this recipe is! I was contemplating whether to make THIS or the English Toffee... so i am going to incorporate BOTH into... Condensed Chocolate Fudge with Toffee bits on top!

Thanks for the baking inspiration, i have never baked before and only got the urge to start from your simple recipes and pictures! Keep up the great work!


On May 28, 2008 at 09:22 PM, cbm296@bellsouth.net (guest) said...
Subject: great fudge
I have been using this recipe for years and have never had a problem. I give it as gifts at Christmas and it is always well received. My family always asks for it at any family get together. I always used the evaporated milk recipe before and it's outcome was always iffy. This is a sure fire success. I would love to make it with white chocolate but need a recipe I can trust. Any help out there?


On June 03, 2008 at 06:08 AM, an anonymous reader said...
My grandmother uses a recipe just like this. I've also seen rachel ray pretty much do the same thing. Next time that I make it Im going to layer some pretzels on the bottome of the pan then pour in the fudge.


On June 16, 2008 at 02:17 PM, an anonymous reader said...
I'm surprised at all of the people saying that their fudge was 'ruined' when they made this recipe. Then again, maybe it's the butter? I've never used butter when making this, just the chocolate and condensed milk.


On July 22, 2008 at 12:24 AM, Jiikyia (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge tips
I save a square black plastic microwave dinner tray. Then I line it with some Reynolds Wrap Non-Stick Release Aluminum Foil. Once the fudge has cooled in the fridge to set, it can be released easily from the tray and foil and then cut up. Or just leave it in the foil and tray and wrap it all up in cellophane or plastic wrap to give it as a gift.


On October 10, 2008 at 03:07 AM, 1000101er (guest) said...
Subject: thanks for great fudge
great stuff i used yours as template added 1/2 pound of 100% cocoa powder, a bit more butter and SCMilk, a mini pinch salt, a pinch sugar, vanilla extract and they came out pretty darn yummy, great consistency, i used a mix of all the recipes i saw on the web except for using corn syrup. your recipe was awesome and great picks too, i got sore mixing that thing on the double boiler but it was worth it.


On October 24, 2008 at 07:20 PM, maxie (guest) said...
Awesome stuff. Easy to make and very tasty!


On November 08, 2008 at 08:56 AM, Davo (guest) said...
Subject: Is it fudge?
Call me old fashioned, but this isn't fudge, is it? Fudge shouldn't need to be kept refridgerated for it to remain set.


On November 30, 2008 at 11:48 PM, an anonymous reader said...
:( I'm really disapointed that even on the printer friendly version, I can't print just the recipe. I have printed about 40 pages and still don't have it. I had to cancell the print


On December 01, 2008 at 06:04 AM, Michael Chu said...
Anonymous wrote:
:( I'm really disapointed that even on the printer friendly version, I can't print just the recipe. I have printed about 40 pages and still don't have it. I had to cancell the print

By default comments are included. You can remove the comments by clicking on the link right below the article (above where the comments start) when in printer friendly mode.


On December 08, 2008 at 09:35 PM, Ally (guest) said...
Subject: Questions
How much fudge does this make?


On December 08, 2008 at 10:46 PM, Dilbert said...
Absurdly Easy Chocolate Fudge (makes 16 2-in. squares)


On December 27, 2008 at 03:23 AM, Stacey (guest) said...
Subject: help me with my fudge
Your fudge sounds great!!! but I have trouble with my butterscotch fudge turning out too soft, here is what I did, can you help me still use what I made with a makeover?
1 c Sugar
1/2 c Butter
3/4 ts Salt
7 1/2 oz Jar marshmallow creme
5 1/3 oz Can evaporated milk
12 oz Butterscotch chips
1/2 ts Vanilla
1/2 c Pecans, chopped
Combine the sugar, butter, salt, marshmallow creme, and milk in a heavy saucepan. Cook to rolling boil over medium low heat. Continue to boil for 5 full minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and add butterscotch chips, vanilla, and pecans. Stir until chips are melted. Pour into well-buttered 9x9 inch square pan. Cool and cut into squares


On December 27, 2008 at 03:38 AM, RGR (guest) said...
Subject: great fudge
I use this recipe yearly and vary it according to my whims. Last year it was dark chocolate and dried cherries. This holiday it is semi-sweet chocolate, dried blueberries and chopped walnuts! It always goes over well at my family holiday get together. Thank you!


On December 29, 2008 at 12:09 AM, Anne (guest) said...
Subject: fudge
Loved this recipe! I combined one pack each of semi-sweet and dark chocolate chips, adjusted liquidity with 2 T more butter and a dash of light cream, and added chopped walnuts and a handful of crushed, dried arbol chiles. Fantastic.


On January 03, 2009 at 03:30 AM, Kathie (guest) said...
Subject: Condensed milk fudge
I made this recipe at Xmas and it turned out horrible! I've made this every year and was stymied as to what went wrong. I finally figured it out! The reason--I forgot I only use raw, organic sugar now, so the sugar did not completely melt. But man, this makes a great hot fudge sauce. :D


On January 07, 2009 at 08:23 PM, Elfer (guest) said...
Subject: units!
This site is called cooking for engineers, yet the recipe says 14 fluid ounces when the can clearly specifies 14 ounces by weight.

As an engineering student, :(


On January 07, 2009 at 09:58 PM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: units!
Elfer wrote:
This site is called cooking for engineers, yet the recipe says 14 fluid ounces when the can clearly specifies 14 ounces by weight.

I'm terribly sorry about that! I can't believe I missed the previous comments (from 2006) about the incorrect quantity of condensed milk. It should have been just one 14 oz. can of condensed milk which is somewhere around 10.5 fluid ounces.

I've corrected the recipe. Thanks for your diligence!


On January 20, 2009 at 02:29 PM, Karthik (guest) said...
Subject: Super quick!
Thanks so much for the quick recipe..made super tasting fudge in less than 15 min..didn't have choc chips..so used a mix of lindt dark, a mars bar and some m&m's. still licking my fingers :-)


On February 09, 2009 at 05:40 PM, guest (guest) said...
Subject: fudge recipe
We used to make a similar fudge when our hyperactive kid was on a low-carbohydrate/high protein diet. We used cream cheese instead of condensed milk - the taste is a little different, but very good, and the fudge is lower in sugar.


On February 15, 2009 at 10:31 PM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: fudge recipe
This was soooo easy, but I'm afraid it was a little bland. Next time, I am going to try adding a little vanilla and a pinch or two of salt. (Salt makes sweet things sweeter, oddly enough.) But I will DEFINITELY make this again!


On April 02, 2009 at 01:46 AM, Frogster1 (guest) said...
Subject: Super Easy Fudge
Well, I think I have the easiest way of all to make this fudge. My ingredients are just slightly different...

I melt 3 Tablespoons of butter in a pot on the stove. Add the condensed milk and 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Stir constantly until very hot, but not quite boiling (about 2 minutes). Remove from heat and add 3 cups any flavor chocolate chips. Stir with a rubber spoon until chips are completely melted (about 1 minute). Add nuts or whatever else you like at this point. Line an 8x8" pan with plastic wrap with ends being twice as long as needed to drape over the sides. Now coat plastic wrap with a little cooking spray. Spread fudge in pan. Wrap the extra plastic wrap over the fudge and wait 2 to 3 hours to set. I let it set at room temperature. It stays softer and moister this way. When I put it in the fridge, it tends to get much harder and dried out. You will find that it sets up nicely just sitting on the counter.

My favorite chips to use are a mixture of half mint chocolate chips and half milk chocolate chips. Also try half peanutbutter chips and half butterscotch chips. No matter what flavor, this fudge will be the hit of EVERY party! I've seen it happen every time!


On April 26, 2009 at 03:09 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: Condensed milk fudge
I've been making this off and on since the 1970s. I heat the sweetened condensed milk and the butter together and then add the chocolate once the milk mixture is heated through enough to melt the butter -- this way you don't have to worry about burning the chocolate or overheating the butter to the point that it separates. I add vanilla, as others have mentioned. You can also substitute peanut butter for the butter -- I prefer this to peanut butter chips, which I find too waxy.


On October 23, 2009 at 01:55 PM, Mom of a future engineer! (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge
My son told me at 9:30 last night, he had signed up to bring Fudge to a class party tomorrow! I have never made fudge before in my life, but found your recipe and just finished making a double batch!
It was sooooo easy! Thank you. I am sure this will become a family favourite, since it was easy for kids to make too.


On October 31, 2009 at 03:10 PM, Bunnies Galore (guest) said...
Subject: Oreo Cookie Fudge
Is this the company that has a recipe for fudge using crumbled sandwich cookies--like Oreos? It's a simple recipe--1 can sweetened condensed milk, 3 squares white chocolate, 1/8 tsp salt and 3 cups coarsely crumbled sandwich cookies. If it's not your recipe, would anyone out there know whose it is? Thanks...


On November 12, 2009 at 12:25 AM, Anna (guest) said...
Subject: RE: Oreo Cookie Fudge
That recipe is from Eagle Brand Sweetened Condensed Milk. I copied and pasted it from their website.

http://www.eaglebrand.com/recipes/details/?RecipeId=3989&category=-1

Cookies 'n Cream Fudge
Ingredients

* 3 (6 oz.) packages white chocolate baking squares
* 1 (14 oz.) can Eagle Brand Sweetened Condensed Milk
* 1/8 teaspoon salt
* 3 cups (about 20 cookies) coarsely crushed chocolate creme-filled sandwich cookies

Instructions

* LINE 8-inch square pan with wax paper, extending paper over edges of pan.
* MELT white chocolate squares with sweetened condensed milk and salt in heavy saucepan over low heat. Remove from heat; stir in crushed cookies. Spread evenly in prepared pan.
* CHILL 2 hours or until firm. Remove from pan by lifting edges of wax paper. Cut into squares.

Oh and I don't add any butter to my fudge and the consistency is perfect, firm and smooth. I follow Eagle Brand's fudge recipe. http://www.eaglebrand.com/recipes/details/?RecipeId=3968&category=-1

Foolproof Chocolate Fudge

* Servings: about 2 pounds
* Prep Time: 10 Minutes
* Cook Time: 5 Minutes

Ingredients

* 3 cups (18 oz.) semi-sweet chocolate chips
* 1 (14 oz.) can Eagle BrandŽ Sweetened Condensed Milk
* Dash salt
* 1/2 to 1 cups chopped nuts (optional)
* 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions

* LINE 8- or 9-inch square pan with foil, extending foil over edges of pan.
* MELT chocolate chips with sweetened condensed milk and salt in heavy saucepan over low heat. Remove from heat. Stir in nuts and vanilla. Spread evenly into prepared pan.
* CHILL 2 hours or until firm. Remove from pan by lifting edges of foil. Cut into squares.
* MICROWAVE METHOD
* COMBINE chocolate chips with sweetened condensed milk and salt in 1-quart glass measure. Cook on HIGH (100% power) 3 minutes or until chips are melted, stirring after 1 1/2 minutes. Stir in remaining ingredients. Proceed as above.
* VARIATIONS
* CREAMY DARK CHOCOLATE FUDGE: MELT 2 cups miniature marshmallows with chocolate chips and sweetened condensed milk. Proceed as above.
* MILK CHOCOLATE FUDGE: OMIT 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips. Add 1 cup milk chocolate chips. Proceed as above.
* CHOCOLATE PEANUT BUTTER CHIP GLAZED FUDGE: FOLLOW above recipe using 3/4 cup peanut butter chips instead of nuts. For glaze, melt 1/2 cup peanut butter chips with 1/2 cup heavy cream. Stir until thick and smooth. Spread over chilled fudge.

I hope this helps.

Anna


On November 21, 2009 at 05:02 AM, MzMic (guest) said...
Subject: Never used butter....NEVER EVER had a problem
I've used this recipe for a couple of years now; however, I lost the recipe & have been going by memory.. I was estatic to find your site to confirm that I wasn't far off.. I do *wish* that I had read about the 1/8 tsp salt (to make sweet things sweeter) I will try that next time, but had to get fudge in fridge for Thanksgiving dinner & family reunion tomorrow.

I just wanted to let ev1 know whom have had probs with this recipe .. that I have NEVER EVER used Butter in my recipe and have Never Ever had a problem with it.. even tho I was guessing at amounts lol.

I use a very very heavy pan, turn on high heat to warm up pan, remove pan from burner, turn burner down to low heat, add the milk choc chips & condensed sweeten cream, and stir ALOT, then put back on burner and stir consistently, add in any extras that you would like..... after choc mixture is smooth, remove from burner & add in the 2 tsp of PURE Vanilla Extract and stir till beautifully shiny & smooth.... then pour into 9X13 pan, (already prepared with Wax Paper that I have laid 2 strips acoss the sides and use packaging tape to tape the ends to the bottom of the pan, after I have put creases into paper along the pans edges) Chill a couple of hours, freeze remainder that you don't use now to use @ a later time, I believe a part of my success with this recipe is adding the vanilla after mixture is smooth AND off the burner. Enjoy :)


On November 23, 2009 at 11:09 PM, Diabetic (guest) said...
Subject: Sweetened Condensed Milk Substitute
To make this fudge more diabetic friendly, try this substitution for the sweetened condensed milk. Note that it isn't sugar free (nor will the fudge be sugar free because of the chips you add)--but it does make it "easier" on the diabetics (like me).

http://www.recipezaar.com/no-sugar-added-sweetened-condensed-milk-395627

To synopsize, in a small bowl mix 1/3 cup boiling water + 2 tbls
4 tablespoons butter
3/4 cup Splenda
1 Cup NONFAT dry milk powder (see website for some cautions as some are "thicker" than others)
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract.

I use this total recipe in place of the 14 oz can of sweetened condensed milk.


On November 24, 2009 at 03:46 PM, tons (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge
mine turned out to be like... fudge, tastes the same like Nutella.. i thot it would turn out into fudgy bready thingy-like fudge....... :( 8| :huh: :shock:


On November 24, 2009 at 04:07 PM, Dilbert said...
>> bready thingy-like fudge

thinking of a "brownie"?


On November 26, 2009 at 09:12 PM, trubrit (guest) said...
Subject: Yummmmeeeee
This fudge is/was :P great and so easy.........i had a can of chocolate flavored condensed milk and used it instead of regular...it has turned delicious
This will be what i give for Christmas to my co-workers this year in little bags. I think a light dusting with confectioners sugar should make it perfect


On December 07, 2009 at 11:28 PM, poppetwa (guest) said...
Subject: Adding alcohol to this recipe?
Anyone had luck adding Bailey's or Kahlua to this recipe and if so how much and at what point so it was successful and didn't seize up?


On December 09, 2009 at 05:22 PM, rosebud11 (guest) said...
Subject: fudge
It was so easy to make. I can not believe I made it and how good it came out. Thanks a lot and I now know what a bain marie is. :)


On December 16, 2009 at 02:55 AM, Secret Fooj (guest) said...
Subject: Toot Sweet
Too sweet.


On December 16, 2009 at 02:22 PM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: Too sweet?
Secret Fooj, if you find the recipe too sweet, try using a very dark chocolate (maybe 86% or even unsweetened chocolate) for the fudge. Since I like bittersweet, using unsweetened chocolate is perfect for me.


On December 18, 2009 at 02:44 PM, Guest (guest) said...
Subject: Soft Fudge
Hey - I know not everyone has time to make traditional fudge; double boiler, candy thermometer, real cocoa.... (I don't!) but if you've ever had the real deal, this fudge is 2nd fiddle at best. So those of you that have the old fashioned kind don't be expecting the same consistancy; this will always be soft.

Kudos to the step by step presentation and pictures.

BTW, I'm sitting her eating both kinds of fudge - the one in the recipe and the traditional kind. Chevy to Cadillac.

Peace


On December 22, 2009 at 05:29 AM, Just stopped by... (guest) said...
Subject: THIS STUFF IS GOOD !!!
SO EASY!
I melted three tbsp butter on low heat, added the condensed milk and stirred well. Added the tablespoon of vanilla and a pinch of salt. Continued stirring until well blended. Removed from medium low heat and added semi-sweet chocolate chips (three cups). Stirred until well blended. Added walnuts (you don't have to...) about a cup or so, and folded these into the fudge. I sprayed a rubbermaid square plastic container, poured in the fudge and let sit on a countertop, covered with plastic wrap, for a couple of hours until it was cool and transferred it to the fridge. The spoon was lick-a-licious ! Thanks! This was the first time I had ever made fudge! Great recipe !!! [/b]


On December 27, 2009 at 03:05 AM, Tina (guest) said...
Subject: Chocolate Condensed Milk
This recipe sounds amazing! I'm going to try it as soon as I can, but I was wondering if it would be okay to use chocolate condensed milk instead of the regular condensed milk with the chocolate chips?


On January 06, 2010 at 02:10 PM, ancelyna (guest) said...
Subject: Amazing!
Ok, so it's not Fudge fudge, but it sure does taste amazing! I gave some it away as gifts and everyone was surprised I made it. All I could do was secretly giggle because they didn't know how easy it was! Hehee (I used the microwave method because my stove wasn't working yet)

To all you people crying about not having chocolate chips:
Chocolate chips are chips made of chocolate! Nothing special, just convenient to use is cooking because of their small chip size. You can use regular chocolate, just chop it up! No problemo! And as a bonus you can use whichever brand and flavor of chocolate you want and usually munch on. A big part of the final taste of the fudge is up to the chocolate you use. If you can't find good quality chocolate chips, don't think using cheap compound chocolate chips will make it taste better than using real chocolate which you have to chop up.

Thank you very much for this amazing recipe!!


On January 27, 2010 at 07:55 AM, vanilajude (guest) said...
Subject: your wonderful condensed milk fudge
:unsure: I found myself absolutely beside myself just a short time ago. I needed fudge and I needed it now!!!
My sis makes this fudge but she's up to early and I can't wake her. So I got on line and Michael bless your heart I can now have my fudge.. :D

Thank you for being so kind.
Vanilajude in Eastern Washington[/u][/b]


On January 30, 2010 at 09:08 PM, Lyndsay (guest) said...
Subject: foolproof chocolate fudge (creamy dark veriation)
this is the best fudge I have ever had and I am recomending it to all of my friends


On March 01, 2010 at 12:57 AM, laurieckk (guest) said...
Subject: fudge
I've been using almost this same recipe for years also, I've found if you use marshmallows also, and leave it sit out(in a pie safe?) it sets up much firmer, more like real fudge. ;)


On March 07, 2010 at 07:36 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: Melting in an oven
I've had good success with melting the fudge ingredients together in an oven-proof saucepan placed in a warm convection oven. The temperature was set to 80 C, and I stirred once after 10 minutes and waited another t0 minutes to stir again. At that point the fudge was finished, that is ready to blend completely and be poured out.


On March 14, 2010 at 09:05 PM, dobes (guest) said...
Subject: fudge
Found the recipe in the NYT and tried it. It came out a glossy, thick liquid that never did harden to the point that it could be cut. It ended up kind of like a thick sauce for hot fudge sundaes - I had to dump it all.

What could have happened???????? :(


On March 14, 2010 at 09:36 PM, Dilbert said...
Subject: Re: fudge
dobes wrote:
Found the recipe in the NYT and tried it. It came out a glossy, thick liquid that never did harden to the point that it could be cut. It ended up kind of like a thick sauce for hot fudge sundaes - I had to dump it all.

What could have happened???????? :(


uhmm, you'd prolly have to post the recipe and what you did for any kind of intelligent guess.


On March 15, 2010 at 12:28 AM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: fudge
Dilbert wrote:
dobes wrote:
Found the recipe in the NYT and tried it. It came out a glossy, thick liquid that never did harden to the point that it could be cut. It ended up kind of like a thick sauce for hot fudge sundaes - I had to dump it all.

What could have happened???????? :(


uhmm, you'd prolly have to post the recipe and what you did for any kind of intelligent guess.

Dobes probably used the recipe from this site since it was published in the New York Times a week or so ago.

Dobes, we'll need to know what the can of condensed milk said (label information - brand, and ingredients), what kind of chocolate, and whether or not you used butter.


On April 18, 2010 at 01:41 AM, stormer (guest) said...
Subject: fudge storage
"'Anonymous wrote:
I make this fudge every Christmas for years, I also make a second version with white chocolate such as Ghiradelli's. My question to the forum is, does this fudge need to be refrigerated, will it spoil if left out at room temperature.'

If the environment isn't humid and room temperature for you isn't too much over 70°F, then the fudge should be able to keep at room temperature for a few weeks.

Where I live, in the summer, the fudge softens too much to keep out of the refrigerator."

didn't read any further when i saw that response but i wanted to give y'all a little tip because i was a fudge maker for a while at a store.

fudge should either be left out on the counter (assuming it isn't too hot/humid as mentioned above) but should NOT be stored in the fridge!! storing it this way will dry out your fudge since the air inside is so dry, we always recommended people store it in the freezer in an air tight bag (obviously!). it stays fresh much longer (i think we told people it could be stored safely for upwards of a year if it lasted that long without being dessimated) and thaws out very quickly!


On April 19, 2010 at 06:01 PM, Karuna (guest) said...
Subject: Tbs?
Just want to confirm if 4 Tbs butter means 4 tablespoons or 4 teaspoons?


On April 19, 2010 at 07:07 PM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: Tbs?
Karuna wrote:
Just want to confirm if 4 Tbs butter means 4 tablespoons or 4 teaspoons?

On this site:
Tbs = Tablespoons
tsp = teaspoons


On May 01, 2010 at 05:21 AM, Stephanie (guest) said...
Subject: Easiesdt way to make this recipe, period
I'm not sure why no one has mentioned this, and i admit I may have missed it in the comments, but the easiest way to make this fudge is to heat the butter and condensed milk in a microwave safe bowl, for about 2 minutes in the microwave. Then pour it over the chocolate chips and let it sit for about a minute to melt the chocolate, then stir! I've made it twice this way and it has turned out lovely both times. It utilizes the convenience of the microwave while completely eliminating the risk of burning the chocolate.


On May 04, 2010 at 01:32 AM, Ngaire (guest) said...
Subject: Wonderful!
I made this for the fist time yesterday, and had leftovers that would not fit in the tin. Decided to try to make some choc mint out of the left overs, 1 tsp of perpermint essence to about 1/3 of the mixture set a little softer than the normal recipe, but tasted GREAT!.

I'm going to try for bailey's flavour next, with white choc, rum and vanilla. YUM!


On May 25, 2010 at 09:54 PM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: No sugar fudge
:angry: I am not sure if I did something wrong but mine came out like toffee..............expensive stuff up.


On May 26, 2010 at 01:20 AM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: No sugar fudge
Anonymous wrote:
:angry: I am not sure if I did something wrong but mine came out like toffee..............expensive stuff up.

Toffee is an unexpected result! Can you tell us what you did? I suspect it might be the ingredients you chose since following this recipe should result in only $6-$10 worth of ingredients.


On June 07, 2010 at 08:31 PM, an anonymous reader said...
OK; Measuring butter by tablespoons, pet hate because it is a stupid idea, it is impossible to be accurate, is messy and takes time. weight measures are what the professionals use and for good reason.
Next, to avoid unnecessary messing around, save time and use fewer dishes just melt the butter in the micro + stir in the choc then the milk. this saves time waiting for cooling.

Preperation, cooking and cooling time 2mins. Job done.

If there is not enough butter to melt the choc then just add some of the cond. milk to the butter before heating.

( im guessing you dont mean LEVEL spoons of butter, clearly that would not be sufficient quantity to melt 1lb of chocolate, but where do you draw the line in terms of how much to heap on the spoon? you could probably balance a full 250g block on a spoon whether it be a teaspoon, dessertspoon or tablespoon.... See what I mean about spoon measures for butter being RIDICULOUS ??) .....Ok, I am aware that a tablespoon measure is a 25ml cup levelled, but why waste time and make a mess by pressing the butter into said receptacle, levveling it and then scooping it out ??? If the recipe stated "100g" then you could simply take a 250g block, cut around 2/5 off and chuck it in the bowl. Obviously, if absolute accuracy is required you would weigh it, my point is that spoon measures are neither convenient nor accurate.

Next point: This stuff is maybe tasty but it is not fudge. Fudge is a specific confection made by a process which utilises the inversion and crystallisation properties of sugar.

It would be more accurate to term this recipe a 'ganache'.

There are 1000's of these recipes on the www , the reason I comment on this one is that the site is called cooking for ENGINEERS and as such, I would expect to find accurate scientific information on the technical aspects of cookery. At best. this is nothing more than a simple housewives recipe .

I believe my 20 years experience as a confectioner is ample qualification to pass these comments, sorry for any offence caused but as previously stated I feel this is entirely justified given the name of the website.


On June 07, 2010 at 09:23 PM, Dilbert said...
apparently you did not make the recipe.

as for teaspoon/tablespoon, I agree it's a arcane measure - started in England as I dimly recall, but in the USA, being an advanced civilization, they put little marks on the paper wrappers of the butter sticks.

I'm forced to presume you're not in USA as you have not seen a clever invention such as an index mark.

>>I believe my 20 years experience as a confectioner is ample qualification to pass these comments,

nope. the problem in dealing with engineers is they actually think, engineers can actual decipher what a teaspoon or tablespoon measure means in context as opposed to a 20 year professional who opts to balance a kilo of butter on a spoon and call it a "tablespoon"


On June 12, 2010 at 01:18 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Everything turned out great when I followed the recipe, except some family members found it too sweet. Anybody know a good way to adjust it so it's not quite so sweet? thanks


On June 12, 2010 at 05:48 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Anonymous wrote:
Everything turned out great when I followed the recipe, except some family members found it too sweet. Anybody know a good way to adjust it so it's not quite so sweet? thanks

Darker chocolate?


On July 27, 2010 at 11:51 PM, Di (guest) said...
Subject: 2 mjinute microwave fudge
I tired it and it is in the fridge---seems to "runny" to set but I will know later. It was easy and fast tho!!! :unsure: :lol:


On September 26, 2010 at 01:46 PM, guest (guest) said...
Subject: powdered cocoa
Recipes are always calling for chips instead of cocoa or even bakers chocolate.
Why? chips are soo much more expensive per ounce, and why use something that is more processed?
It does not make sense to me to use chips as a substitute.


On October 27, 2010 at 03:32 PM, Catherine (guest) said...
I made this and the kids LOVED it!! It makes LOADS... the children are going to take some for their friends for Xmas in some little boxes.

Its not granular like other fudge cos there is no sugar in it, its more like a soft fondant/nougaty kind of chocolate but is still scum diddly umptious!!!!!!

So quick and easy to make - all I have to do now is experiment with it!!


On December 01, 2010 at 03:26 AM, Fudgester (guest) said...
Subject: fudge
This fudge is the best in the world. :P


On December 05, 2010 at 02:55 AM, Guest (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge
I was rather wondering if, as engineers, anyone could point out whether in the old fashioned fudge (heating, cooling and beating method) would be effected by the use of cream in lieu of milk.


On December 05, 2010 at 10:54 AM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: Fudge
Guest wrote:
I was rather wondering if, as engineers, anyone could point out whether in the old fashioned fudge (heating, cooling and beating method) would be effected by the use of cream in lieu of milk.

As long as you follow the correct temperatures, you should be able to make fudge using cream instead of milk using the traditional method without a problem.


On December 05, 2010 at 10:55 PM, Guest/Kristin (guest) said...
Subject: Cream substitution
Thank you for your input :) I'll let you know how it turns out.


On March 19, 2011 at 01:57 PM, cjenn@ptd.net (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge made w/ Sweetened condensed milk BUT need advice..
Nigella Lawson says she uses 12 ounces of Bakers Chocolate{12 squares] to 24 ounces of sweetened condensed milk BUT I only have 8 Squares of Bakers Chocolate..& 14 ounces of sweetened condensed milk also
2 tblsp of butter
pinch of salt
TSP Vanilla?
BUT I use Salt Sense same salt but 1/2 the bite not important,right?
BUT I have 8 ounces {8 Squares}{ I will chop us to melt..}BUT
How much Condensed Milk do I add to 8 ounces from a 14 ounce can of Condensed Milk so she uses both the same amounts of each..using 12 ounces of chocolate to 24 ounces of "Sweetened Condensed Milk" BUT I only have 8 OUNCES OF CHOCOLATE so
How MUCH MILK DO I ADD?
AND DO I ADD VANILLA
Can I add coconut AFTER OR BEFORe IT COOLa
Having such a problem because how does one know how much milk to add to 8 ounces of Squares melted Please help! :(


On March 19, 2011 at 02:12 PM, cjenn@ptd.net (guest) said...
Subject: Re: Fudge
Michael Chu wrote:
Guest wrote:
I was rather wondering if, as engineers, anyone could point out whether in the old fashioned fudge (heating, cooling and beating method) would be effected by the use of cream in lieu of milk.

As long as you follow the correct temperatures, you should be able to make fudge using cream instead of milk using the traditional method without a problem.
:
Can you please answer cjenn@ptd.net re sweetened Condensed Milk 14 ounces BUT I Only have 8 ounces of chocolate {bakers Chocolate} squares[will chop of course] BUT if 12 ounces of squares to 24 ounces of milk[Condensed] then what do I add to my 8 ounces of squares and my 14 ounces of Condensed Milk when making Fudge?
Do I take away the am't of milk or add "ALL the 14 ounces of condensed" milk?Please Help Nigella Lawson the cookingchennel makes 12 ounces {squares]to 24 condensed milk
How does one "cut or add this kind of uneven measuring Oh God please don't let it come out watery..how much MILK?? Please! Guest.


On March 19, 2011 at 04:44 PM, Dilbert said...
if you're short on choc - 8 oz vs 12 called for,

just use 2/3 of the ingredients called for
example two-thirds of 24 ounces of condensed milk = 16 oz
which is problematic, since you only have 14 ounces of that anyway.

you could add 2 ounces of something else - cream perhaps, or whole milk, but you have to realize you are running a risk as most candy recipes are pretty well 'fixed' in their proportions.


On November 20, 2011 at 10:18 PM, Vince (guest) said...
Subject: My version of the condensed milk fudge...
I like the Following recipe...

3 oz of cream cheese
2 packages of chocolate chips
1 can (small can of sweetened condensed milk)

melt ingredents together like other fudge recepies, pour into a disposable 9x9 aluminum pan with wax paper covering the bottom before pouring in. let cool, and chill before cutting.

Variations -
I like to use the darkest sweetened chocolate I can get, and add about 4 tablespoons of expresso roast beans that have been turkish ground into a very fine powder.

also adding things like toffee bits or nuts to the origional receipe are good. also consider rasberry chocolate chips, dried cranberry or dried cherry's are good too...


On December 22, 2011 at 09:41 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: for the fellow who got toffee
did you microwave it? if so, you probably burned it -- did this once reheating a chocolate ganache sauce [hit 10 min instead of 1 min] -- oil and cocoa solids separate and the resulting sticky solid mess is very toffee-like


On January 14, 2012 at 03:31 AM, Desperate for fudge (guest) said...
Subject: Cocoa powder
Is there any way I can use cocoa powder instead of chocolate, as I don't have any ? :/ please reply.


On January 14, 2012 at 05:32 AM, Michael Chu said...
Subject: Re: Cocoa powder
Desperate for fudge wrote:
Is there any way I can use cocoa powder instead of chocolate, as I don't have any ? :/ please reply.

Not really. Cocoa powder isn't the same as chocolate (not even 100% cacao chocolate). It's only one part of the ingredients (the other part being the cocoa butter which has been removed to make cocoa powder). You might be able to get it to work by adding other ingredients, but I wouldn't know where to start without a lot of experimenting... easier to just buy chocolate.


On September 07, 2012 at 12:53 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: Microwave fudge
This microwave method prevents burning the chocolate by adding it at the end: mix condensed milk, butter & sugar. Microwave 3 minutes. Take out and stir. Microwave another 3 minutes. Take out and stir again. Microwave another 3 minutes. Sitr in chocolate. The chocolate melts due to the heat, but never gets microwaved. Magic! Cadbury chocolate melts work very nicely - using whilte chocolate with brown sugar (instead of white) makes a delicious caramel flavor fudge.


On October 08, 2012 at 04:35 PM, Lori Pickett (guest) said...
Subject: Fudge
I make fudge for Christmas gifts every year. It's not even requested anymore. It is EXPECTED! Anyway, I use 1 package of almond bark to 1 can of condensed milk, melt together. Take off the burner add flavoring, color, nuts, candy, etc. Pour into buttered dish and let sit.
For Maple I use white almond bark and mix in 1 1/2 tsp. maple flavoring. I have made white with vanilla and add chopped up candied cherries. I have made bananna fudge, raspberry, cherry, etc. Make the white fudge and add 1 1/2 tsp of whatever flavoring suits you. If you want color use food coloring gel (not liquid). They do have chocolate and butterscotch almond bark if you would rather just have those flavors.


On November 25, 2012 at 08:06 AM, Liliya81 (guest) said...
Subject: love this recipe
I found this recipe years ago, and absolutely love it. Tried other ones but nothing compares to this one. Thank you so much for posting this recipe.


On December 07, 2013 at 06:52 AM, an anonymous reader said...
Subject: fudge
I have been making this fudge for years and it is allways good. I heat the condensed milk in a glass microwave bowl first in microwave untill it starts to boil let boil for about 3 minutes.take out and add rest of ingredients. stir untill it starts to thicken about 1 minute. our into tin foil lined dish and refrigerate about 2 or 3 hours untill firm. You can takel foil off with no trouble.

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