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Equipment & Gear: Common Materials of Cookware
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Gloria
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 4:42 pm    Post subject: Why does water tastes different boiled in different kettles? Reply with quote

I would like to choose an electric kettle to boil water, however, I am interested to know why water tastes different from different kettles. I am wondering if the material used in the different kettles, is the difference in taste of the boiled water. Is there a way to test to determine the metal is making the difference? Are there are reasons for the water to taste different?

I found this website, in a search to help me with these questions.

Thanks for all input.
Gloria
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use stainless steel cookware no larger than the burners to help in having even cooking. Then I place the cookware on a cast iron pan that I had in the oven while I was baking something else. This helps keep my food hot longer without buring more fuel/electricity.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 1:35 am    Post subject: Re: Why does water tastes different boiled in different kett Reply with quote

Gloria wrote:
I would like to choose an electric kettle to boil water, however, I am interested to know why water tastes different from different kettles. I am wondering if the material used in the different kettles, is the difference in taste of the boiled water. Is there a way to test to determine the metal is making the difference? Are there are reasons for the water to taste different?

I found this website, in a search to help me with these questions.

Thanks for all input.
Gloria


The water tastes different from different kettles because of the differences in reactivity of the metal the pots are made of. Some stainless pots may have solders or fluxes that remain that can affect the taste of the water. A plain stainless steel pot wil probably taste best because stainless is least reactive and will have least interaction with the water as it heats and boils. My feeling is a an all stainless pot, not even one with a copper bottom is best. I have a Krups electric kettle and it makes fast, clean tasting boiled water.

Also make sure the clean out the pot occasionally even though only water is placed in it because in some areas, lime may deposit on the walls of the kettle.
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 2:08 pm    Post subject: Swiss Diamond Cookware and PTFE Reply with quote

There seems to be some confusion about Swiss Diamond cookware. It does not contain Teflon (TM). However, Teflon is merely DuPont's brand name for various polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) nonstick products.

Swiss Diamond contains PTFE, just not Teflon (TM) PTFE. The Swiss Diamond FAQ states this very clearly. If you believe that you are avoiding some terrible fate by using Swiss Diamond cookware instead of Teflon cookware, you are misguided. PTFE, regardless of brand name, will degrade and release small quantities of mildly toxic fumes -- not particularly harmful to humans, but they might kill a pet bird.

So, don't believe that Swiss Diamond is somehow safer than Teflon. However, both, when treated well, pose absolutely no health risks. Smoking oil on the stove is a far greater cancer risk than over-heated teflon. Buy your cookware based on how well it works for you, not groundless health claims. And get a range hood for your stove if you're really worried.
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Socalgail
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PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 6:03 pm    Post subject: Bad Link on this Page Reply with quote

This link http://ww3.komotv.com/Global/story.asp?S=3615478 referenced in a post by TruthFinder on January 15, 2006 at 11:04 AM caused my PC to crash. Just thought you might like to edit the post.

Thanks,
Gail
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 2:26 am    Post subject: Re: Bad Link on this Page Reply with quote

Socalgail wrote:
This link http://ww3.komotv.com/Global/story.asp?S=3615478 referenced in a post by TruthFinder on January 15, 2006 at 11:04 AM caused my PC to crash. Just thought you might like to edit the post.

I tried the link on multiple computers and couldn't find any problems.
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guest
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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 2:15 pm    Post subject: Great Cookware articles Reply with quote

Here are a couple of cookware articles that I really like.

Essential Cookware - http://thebestcookware.blogspot.com/2008/05/essential-cookware-for-your-kitchen.html

How to choose frying pans - http://www.salamandercookshop.com/index.php?main_page=page&id=11&chapter=0
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Justsmartliving
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2008 7:38 pm    Post subject: Sustainable Stainless Steel Reply with quote

A very objective analysis. Nice work.

We have been proponents of the benefits of stainless steel cookware in terms of sustainability for years. I personally wanted to call to your attention what the Specialty Steel Industry of North America (SSINA) says about the benefits of stainless steel in terms of sustainability.

We've paraphrased their comments here:
http://www.justsmartliving.com/blog/2008_10_01_archive.html

And their original article can be found here:
http://www.ssina.com/overview/features.html
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kelly
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2008 3:22 am    Post subject: vollrath carbon steel fry pans Reply with quote

i was gifted some vollrath carbon steel fry pans (no aluminum disk, all steel). had some performance issues I didn't really expect. even with some extensive pre-heating, on the 12", i have pretty dramatic hot spots on the largest burner I have... fry bacon, center of the pan is much hotter than the edges, results aren't pretty. stove is ceramic cooktop (unfortunately)... function of the stove or the pan? thinking the pan just isn't a particular good match for the stove i have but not sure.

I like the carbon steel pans for certain things, great for throwing in the oven, just not quite what i was expecting.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 1:46 pm    Post subject: seasoning cast iron Reply with quote

I have several cast iron pieces, and am looking for information about seasoning. I typically use lard, as I find vegetable oil has a tendency to get sticky. Is it better to use a fat with a high smoke point? Or is a higher viscosity better to penetrate further into the pores of the cast iron? What is the optimal temperature to heat the pans to as you are seasoning? Any tips on making the seasoning last as long as possible?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1001
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lodge is one of the better brands, here's their guide:

http://www.lodgemfg.com/use-care-seasoned-cast-iron.asp
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aztraph



Joined: 11 Jul 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Seymour, IN

PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2009 11:29 pm    Post subject: Titanium cookware Reply with quote

Does anyone have any experience cooking with Titanium pans, Pros, Cons. they're a bit expensive so I want to do research before I buy any.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1001
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2009 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

aztraph -

indeed you should research the brand and its specifications very carefully.

a number of companies are marketing "titanium" cookware. aside from camping gear (which is just plain metal, lightweight) all of the brands I have checked use a sputter coating of titanium, which creates a sandpaper like surface, and the "holes" between the "grains" is filled in with PTFE - the generic name for Teflon (a DuPont trademark.)

most of the marketing hype will say "does not contain Teflon" - well, if I fill up my car gas tank with gasoline, not Exxon, what's the diff?

many marketing sites simply state its a proprietary thing - they don't say if it does, or if it doesn't.

also note the warranty info on many sites: if you cook too hot, cooking fats will coke on the pan and void the warranty.

note also the "safe to 500 degrees"- titanium will go a whole lot hotter than that, what's holding them back?

interesting link: http://www.naturalnews.com/021059.html

SwissDiamond now states:

Quote:

Do Swiss Diamond products contain “PTFE”?
YES! PTFE is the component that gives non-stick properties to the surface of the cookware and many other consumers’ products. Our patented inherent slippery coating is reinforced with Diamond Crystals which are amalgamated into a nano-composite (mixture of extremely thin particles). Thus it requires lower quantity of PTFE, much lower than most of other non-stick products.


at the basis of all the marketing hype and misinformation is the simple fact that PTFE is - so far as I have ever seen documented - the only durable "non-stick" compound in existence.

various "green pans" claim a silica based technology, which apparently does not last very long, judging by the consumer reviews.

see: http://dannyseo.typepad.com/my_weblog/2007/10/green-pan-updat.html

that thread also points out the need to be very aware of the site you are reading - as stated there, tv sales channels do not allow negative posts to remain - only the rave reviews.
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Jersey
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 6:23 pm    Post subject: Cuisinart Chef's Classic Stainless clad cookware & oxida Reply with quote

I recently purchased a 17 piece of Cuisinart Chef's Classic Stainless clad cookware and am very unhappy with it. Virtually all the pieces now have an oxidadized inner bottom. I have never used more than med heat and have followed all directions to a "T". Is this something that just happens with this type of cookware? It is encapsulated on the bottom with an aluminum core sandwiched between stainless steel.
As soon as I cooked anything in these pans, an unsightly oxidation appeared where the food had been. It cannot be removed and is now part of the pans.
Please, engineers, let me know what's going on.
Thank you
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1001
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it's certainly not something that "just happens with this type..."

according to their web site it's 18/10 stainless steel - and should not discolor, etc.

I've got stainless steel pans that go back two generations that are not discolored or oxidized in any manner.

I'd be tempted to contact them and ask what's up - do note that the warranty explicitly excludes "discoloration" - a bit of clarification with regard to "oxidation" would be helpful.
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