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Rapeseed Oil v Soybean Oil

 
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sacko



Joined: 02 Feb 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2007 12:49 pm    Post subject: Rapeseed Oil v Soybean Oil Reply with quote

Ok Guys here's one for you ...
What is best Rapeseed Oil or Soybean Oil? I am most interested about the smoke point and the long term health risks for each.
I have been told that smoke from the oil during cooking can be toxic, is one worse than the other??
Would be interesting to view your comments.

Regards
Sacko
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scott123



Joined: 23 Dec 2006
Posts: 15
Location: Morristown, NJ

PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2007 1:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Inhaling any kind of smoke is not a good idea healthwise. As long as you have good ventilation in your kitchen, though, smoke is not an issue.

Smoke from oil is far less of a concern than oil that's been oxidized by heat. Heat creates trans fatty acids. This is what makes oils unhealthy. At least those that are susceptible to damage by heat, mainly liquid oils. Unfortunately, almost all rapeseed and soy oils have been processed using heat, so they aren't the healthiest choice for cooking/frying. Your best bet is to use a liquid oil that hasn't been exposed to heat (extra virgin olive oil) and take care not to heat it too much (use it in salads or add off the stove) or use a far more stable saturated fat like beef fat, pork fat/lard, palm oil or coconut oil. Because of their molecular structure, saturated fats are the most stable/healthiest fats for frying/sauteeing.

Rapeseed and soybean oils are a lose-lose situation. Not only are they unhealthy because of the processing they go through, they taste horrible. The only good thing about them is price. If you render/save/freeze the fats from roasts/bacon, though- that's the most economical, best tasting and healthiest option of all. Saving enough fat to deep fry gets a little tricky, but it can be done. Also, because of the trans fats/hydrogenated oil scare, palm oil is becoming a lot more available/affordable. Palm oil is excellent for deep frying.
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watt
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2007 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

there is an urban myth that trans fatty acids are formed during deep fat frying, it is simply untrue. The trans FA are formed in an industrial process to get more saturation into the FA to increase stability (lessen breakdown).

My advise is don't worry about smoke point. I have used rape seed oil in deep fat frying and other processes for years without problems (none that I am aware of, anyway Teasing ).

Rape seed oil is very healthy, as it contains omega 3/6 FA. A 50/50 mix of RSO and olive oil (not necessarily EVO) will provide an ideal (current wisdom) balance of omega 3/6 FA. And to me and others, RSO tastes just fine.

Recent research has shown cotton seed oil to be the best for deep fat frying, but I've never seen it for sale.
HTH
watt
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1620
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2007 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

watt wrote:
there is an urban myth that trans fatty acids are formed during deep fat frying, it is simply untrue. The trans FA are formed in an industrial process to get more saturation into the FA to increase stability (lessen breakdown).

Although the amounts of trans fatty acids produced by heating oil in your home is minimal compared to the quantities potentially found in commercial foods, trans fatty acids ARE formed during deep fat frying. During heating, cis bonds can reconfigure into trans bonds.

I find that peanut oil works really well for deep frying. Canola (modified rapeseed oil) has always imparted an undertone of undersirable flavor to my deep fried food.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 4:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael Chu wrote:
Canola (modified rapeseed oil) has always imparted an undertone of undersirable flavor to my deep fried food.


When I was investigating smoke points of various oils, I learned a lot about canola oil because at the time it seemed to be a good choice. However, I will NEVER use canola oil as a food product again. Canola is GENETICALLY MODIFIED rapeseed. Transgenic modification has been used to increase the total saturated fatty acid content of canola. That means DNA from an unrelated organism has been artificially introduced. For deep frying, I use peanut oil.

See these links:

http://breathing.com/articles/canola-oil.htm

http://www.rense.com/politics6/canola.htm

http://www.hbci.com/~wenonah/new/canola.htm

http://www.karinya.com/canola.htm

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=1838642

http://regional.org.au/au/gcirc/4/57.htmhttp://regional.org.au/au/gcirc/4/57.htm

not directly related, but also see this:

http://www.krafty.org/flash/

http://www.krafty.org/

Canola is also said to prolong food freshness. I don't recall who said this, but he said "Food that doesn't go bad, is bad for you," meaning that preservatives aren't good for you. Canola falls into this category.
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scott123



Joined: 23 Dec 2006
Posts: 15
Location: Morristown, NJ

PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GaryProtein wrote:
I don't recall who said this, but he said "Food that doesn't go bad, is bad for you," meaning that preservatives aren't good for you.


I'm familiar with a similar adage:

Eat food that spoils, before it spoils.
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watt
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

of the SCIENTIFIC papers I've looked at, the concensus is that there is minimal production of trans fatty acid (esters) formed from prolonged frying of potato products, and that the neccesary replenishment of fresh oil from time to time reduces those levels to insignificant. So, yes, cis isomers can flip to trans isomers, but in minute and insignificant amounts.

As for the rest of the 'information' cited above, its all hearsay, or put another way, a complete load of ********.

You will believe what you want to believe in the end.

I use rape seed oil all the time. I've been told on many occassions I look up to 10 years younger than I am, my cholesterol is low, my eyesight is normal for my age, and the last retinal scan showed an improvement over the one before, which was excellent. My blood pressure is usually around 125/75, and resting pulse is below 60 bpm. I do not suffer from BSE, nor have I been exposed to 'mustard gas'. But, I don't eat at McDonalds, or KFC, or at burger joints, pizza joints or eat chilli dogs.

healthy watt
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2007 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rapeseed oil IS NOT canola oil. Canola is genetically modified rapeseed. Rapeseed is fine, it's the canola I want to stay away from.
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JennyT
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Canola was developed through conventional plant breeding from rapeseed.........
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JennyT wrote:
Canola was developed through conventional plant breeding from rapeseed.........


No is wasn't, rapeseed was mdified by the addition of non-rapeseed DNA. It was transgenetically modified.
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JennyT
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

no, the original canola crops were not GM'ed, jusr selectively bred, but now they can be, about half of Canada's output is GM'ed.
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SirSpice



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've always fried with vegetable oil, but after trying peanut oil I was hooked. It works much better and the food dosen't have the flavor from the oil.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JennyT wrote:
no, the original canola crops were not GM'ed, jusr selectively bred, but now they can be, about half of Canada's output is GM'ed.


OK, so as I originally stated, what is available now is transgenetically modified, so I have to stay away from what is available now.
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