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Recipe File: Osso Buco
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ELibby
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PostPosted: Sun May 17, 2009 11:18 pm    Post subject: home shank sawing Reply with quote

"I still wonder about home shank-sawing. " All you really need is a small hacksaw. There was always one hanging on a nail behind the fridge when I was growing up. My mom used it for ham steaks from the whole ham, and my Dad would put in a new blade whenever needed, (two wingnuts, easy) Best of success!
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tommy
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 5:33 pm    Post subject: Fake veal? Reply with quote

I saw some shanks at a store - $24 each - but, they looked real red...I thought veal was kind of white. How can one tell real veal?

Unsure
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1000
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2009 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

veal is young cow / young beef

retail labeling is subject to .... uhm errr. not much truth in advertising.

regardless, yes - veal tends to the paler side of shades - but color is probably not a real good criteria.
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tommy
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 12:11 am    Post subject: Real veal? Reply with quote

Thanks Dilbert....yep, I know retail labeling is problematic at best.....but, um...isn't veal unborn bovine?

I guess we wouldn't have much of a shank to work with if unborn were the case though....

I reckon I'll just try what they have....Tom
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2009 3:50 am    Post subject: Re: Real veal? Reply with quote

tommy wrote:
Thanks Dilbert....yep, I know retail labeling is problematic at best.....but, um...isn't veal unborn bovine?

Veal can be unborn cattle, but not in the United States. I don't know where you are, but the rules here are that cattle must be able to walk immediately prior to slaughter to enter the food system. "Bob veal" which are baby calves one month of age or less (which include unborn cattle) is the category that you're thinking of, but most veal is not bob veal. If the calf is on the older side and has had a chance to graze/eat grain or eat food besides milk, then both can contribute to the color of the flesh while still being technically considered veal due to its age... or it could be mislabeled.
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guest
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 2:34 pm    Post subject: Oven Temperature Reply with quote

Good stuff! One thing you don't mention is what temperature to set the oven...325?...bake or roast? Thanks!
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1000
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

/quote
Begin to preheat the oven to 350F (175C).
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malayne
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 9:11 pm    Post subject: cooking Reply with quote

I am making veal ossobucco tonight, browned & slow cooked, garlic, onion, carrots, tomato & o goody for us. thanks for all the great ideas.
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Guestulator
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 9:39 am    Post subject: Butter Reply with quote

I am constantly amazed to see the colour of butter you use. It took me a while of seeing to actually realise it was butter!

Love this recipe, have used it a few times now Smile
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2009 5:50 pm    Post subject: Re: Butter Reply with quote

Guestulator wrote:
I am constantly amazed to see the colour of butter you use. It took me a while of seeing to actually realise it was butter!

Is it too pale? Butter in the U.S. is often very pale due to the feed that is provided to dairy cows. Grass-fed cows produce a richer, more golden color to their butter (and the butter has healthful properties missing from the non-grass fed varieties).
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recipe was great... but ya gotta do something with your "Printer Friendly Version"... 24 pages is NOT printer friendly
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2009 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
Recipe was great... but ya gotta do something with your "Printer Friendly Version"... 24 pages is NOT printer friendly

You can turn off comments in Printer Friendly Version, by clicking on the link that says "hide comments" at the bottom of the article.
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Maureen
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 24, 2009 11:22 pm    Post subject: Ossobuco Reply with quote

I usually use lamb shanks when I cook this dish. I have used veal as
well but find that lamb shanks have more meat on them. My whole family loves it that way. If you are not a fan of lamb then I would stick to veal or pork otherwise give it a try!!
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nate
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2010 5:56 am    Post subject: great recipe Reply with quote

For those with questions about stacking, it has been found through much testing with braising pot roast, etc, that boiling/simmering, and braising generally yield the same result. IE, stacking would not make much difference. The real key with braising is cooking past the point you think is too long. Do not stop until the collagen melts, and the meat goes very tender.
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Maddy
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:50 pm    Post subject: Ossobuco Old Hand Reply with quote

I found this recipe (and wonderful site) just now looking for a photo to illustrate the invitation to my 20th Annual Ossobuco dinner party. I've seen the price go from $5/pound to almost $20/pound in New York in that time.

I generally brown, braise and reduce the day before the dinner, using both a slow cooker and a pressure cooker. It reheats beautifully for the dinner party (hey, it's stew! Always better the next day), and that frees up the pressure cooker for making real Risotto Milanese in quantity. A pressure cooker is the only way to make good risotto other than the "stand there and stir non-stop for 20 minutes" classic method.

I agree from experience that using white wine (not red) and chicken stock (not beef) lets the more delicate flavor of the veal come through.

Re: which cut of shanks. I start collecting and freezing shanks way ahead of time, so I can get the SMALLER shanks with a well-defined and hollow bone full of marrow (treat!). So I average serving 2 very small or 1 medium shank per person. (And leftovers for me, of course!)

This is a dandy site. Love the step-by-step instructions. I'm bookmarking it!
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