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Recipe File: Osso Buco
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can you use any type of shank in this recipe, like beef or pork?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

classically it's veal shanks - but certainly you can use the same technique on any shank - beef and lamb are two others often used.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the great osso buco recipe.

Here in Hungary we have quite a few good recipe for shanks, but by this even my great cook father was amased.

We had the same dish once in Toscana with my husband , in a tipical family run restaurant, but frankly to say it was even better.

I do not know how most of you consume the meal, but please say that you also eat the bond marrow, as it is far the best part of it.
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shadowstabbing
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 12, 2010 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only 2 problems...

1. We don't "brown" braised meats, we sear. That was a horribly weak sear. I understand you were using butter and may not have wanted to induce smoking, but next time just use oil and crank the temp to high. That sear is very, very important.

2. Don't use "broth." Most of the time broth you get in a store is salty garbage. If you can find it, go for stock. Other than that, very nice piece.
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Salty McButter
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 2:57 am    Post subject: if you sear with oil, do you still get good fond? Reply with quote

i did this recipe twice in the last week, and it came out fantastic. this second time, i did not get the sear i wanted....

if you use oil, will the fond still have as good flavor? how about butter and oil?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just use olive oil for a heavy sear - it does just fine in the fond category.

you can use a mix of cooking oil & butter - I often do that for a saute on a "delicate" dish where I'm looking for a flavor kicker.

with osso buco there are other strong flavors to the dish that I think will completely hide the butter taste.
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 03, 2010 4:23 am    Post subject: Anchovy surprise Reply with quote

Thought I was an expert with osso buco until I saw an italian-born home cook add an anchovy early on to the browning sauce. It works. Anchovy is a flavour bullet! You don't actually taste or want to taste anything fishy. It adds depth of flavour, or is simply a flavour enhancer...not sure which.

Anchovy may be the natural mono-sodium glutamate of slow cooked meats - but without the bad connotations. It's been used in rich dark sauces like Worcestershire forever, so clearly something is going on.

Wouldn't bother going out to buy anchovies, but if you've got some handy then be bold and give it a go.
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CJ
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 6:25 pm    Post subject: Northern Italian Osso Bucco Reply with quote

My family is from northern Italy and I grew up eating Osso Bucco. We use beef shank, which is far cheaper than veal. The flavor can also stand up better to a red wine instead of white. Brown beef heavily in olive oil. We use more carrot and onion in the mirepoix, no tomatoes, add an anchovey to the broth, and use only stock. Serve over parmesean polenta. We add the gremolata as a garnish over the whole dish.

I've braised in the oven, on top of the stove, and used a crock pot. The only difference is the crockpot doesn't reduce the broth as well. I've done single layers and stacked layers for more portions with no change in results. Just keep your kettle covered.

It is rich and satisfying in small portions, and costs maybe $10 US for a family of four.
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JT
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 02, 2011 8:15 pm    Post subject: Osso Bucco Reply with quote

Have made this recipe several times. The family loves it. Am making it today. Used bacon grease for the browning and ran the shanks through flour first for a little twist this time.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 1:50 am    Post subject: Ossobuco Reply with quote

I'm preparing ossobuco as I write this (and I'm also an engineer!) This is a splendid dish. I note all the prominent websites with ratings show five stars for their recipes--not surprising. My preparation is similar to yours, but I'm using a light red wine (Pinot Noir) tonight. I once tried a big Cabernet, but thought it was too much. I also go heavy on the veggies. An hour into cooking, the meat is still on the tough side, but the sauce is already silky and rich. I'll make saffron risotto to accompany. Thanks, Michael!
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cuisinista
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:15 am    Post subject: ossobuco Reply with quote

I have been making ossobuco successfully for many years. here are some comments: I found a good source of pale veal for ~$5/lb. I get incensed by the outrageous prices for inferior shanks that some fancy stores get away with. This is a poor person's meat/dish even though it is wonderful. Humble cuts often are elevated by elegant preparations. I do not agree that any shank will do. Pale veal becomes very delicate succulent melt-in-your-mouth meat that you can't achieve with other meats. Not that they aren't good - just not the same. I add a fennel to my vegetable mix. I use white wine, chicken broth and some meat glaze I save from broiling beef. If it is needed I use a small squeeze of anchovy paste I keep in the fridge for when I need a bit of umami. I use silver thyme, a bit of oregano and sometimes a bit of basil and or tarragon if they are around fresh and a bay leave. I use plum tomatoes some fresh, some canned. I find if you cook it, let it cool, then reheat, the flavor improves.
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dinnerteaser
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PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2012 2:57 pm    Post subject: osso buco video Reply with quote

hi! this is great. i made ossso buco in a similar way, however i served it with a really rich risotto. it turned out fantastic and a big success with my friends!!! we made a video of the whole process, have a look at it

http://dinnerteaser.tumblr.com/post/21853136628/osso-buco

bon apetito!!
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NYC cook & eat
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 3:09 pm    Post subject: What's the best cut? Reply with quote

I bought veal shanks for this and was told that the center cut shank is a better cut than the shoulder cut. Since this was my first attempt, I went with the butcher's advice and it was good. My friend thought it was a way to charge me more for smaller size pieces. What's your opinion on this? I'd like to be sure I'm getting the best price on the best cut. Thanks!

By the way, my friend thought it tasted great.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

classically this is cut from the leg section between the 'ankle' and the 'knee' - either front or hind leg, and people have their favorites, I personally prefer the front leg shank.

not heard of any of them described as 'shoulder' - might be a local term?

there is not a huge amount of meat on them - but done right it's very tasty.
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merrymeadow
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 4:32 pm    Post subject: ossobuco Reply with quote Delete this post

I just found this recipe and I'll be trying it out tonight. In the meantime, though, I love how you set out the recipe; visually it is really easy to follow during the cooking process.
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