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Kitchen Notes: Tempering Chocolate
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:41 pm    Post subject: Parafin Reply with quote

If you aren't buying high dollar chocolate, expect there to be parafin already in it. I think Hersheys does, and most generic choco chips contain it as well as cheap holiday chocolates...

Considering what other things we eat (and drink), and Breath (lol) an oz or two of wax in your lb of chocolate isn't really a big deal...
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Roxanne
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 8:40 pm    Post subject: refrigerating to cool the chocolate faster Reply with quote

CAn you place molded tempered chocolate into the fridge to cool it faster or will this upset the final results?
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 10:27 pm    Post subject: re: help Reply with quote

just wanted to stop by (hopefully) for the last time and say thanks. We did actually get some pretzles dipped last night, and they all hardened. There was some bloom and they aren't really snappy, but they'll work. My excess chocolate all hardened overnight and melting it again today seems to be working wonderfully.

Thanks so much!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 12:35 am    Post subject: Re: refrigerating to cool the chocolate faster Reply with quote

Roxanne wrote:
Can you place molded tempered chocolate into the fridge to cool it faster or will this upset the final results?

Depending on the type of mold. Tempered chocolate shrinks as it cools (this is what enables you to unmold them easily, they shrink away from the mold). However, in some cases, chilling will cool the chocolate so quickly that the chocolate can crack because of uneven cooling and shrinkage.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2006 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's a good way of keeping the melted tempered chocolate at 31C-32C ready for use? I tried keeping a close eye on the thermometer while taking the bowl on and off the double-boiler. However, this keeps me really busy and I can't do other things very well. Also, my thermometer response time isn't so great and the steam emerged every time I take off the bowl can potentially contaminate the chocolate. Any better ideas? Thanks in advance.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 3:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

What's a good way of keeping the melted tempered chocolate at 31C-32C ready for use?


A heating pad - the kind you use for a stiff back - works well.
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Elgog
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2006 10:01 pm    Post subject: Wax in chocolate Reply with quote

Wax has been used in chocolate candies for years. In the 60's my mother would always caution me to not buy the chocolate candies with the wax in it. Wax will allow the chocolate to survive a higher ambient temprature and keep the chocolate firm. It will also not melt in your hand. Unfortunately, it also will not melt in your mouth. Chocolate with wax in it will not disperse the chocolate flavor as quickly either because the wax melts at a higher temperture and does not release the chocolate in to your mouth. The wax keeps the chocolate encapsulated and mutes the flavor.

Since parafin wax has been used for years in food products, including canning and as a fat replacement, my guess is that it has not been found to be bad for you. I find parafin wax in a lot of things.

Here is something for you to look for, in Hawaian Punch there is an ingredient called Glyceraol Ester of Wood Rosin. It's a texture modifier so that the puch feels more syrupy in your mouth.
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anoccasionalchocolate
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2007 6:09 pm    Post subject: Great directions thank you! Reply with quote

I love reading how other people get this accomplished! Thank you!

http://www.anoccasionalchocolate.com
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guest
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 9:10 pm    Post subject: tempering chocolate Reply with quote

thanks for this tutorial.

my zojirushi bread machine keeps an even temperaure of 88 F during the preheat, kneading and rising process. (most other bread machines have the temperature in the mid to high 90s). i think it would be perfect for keeping the chocolate warm while it is being used to coat the truffle centers.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 5:48 pm    Post subject: Seized chocolate Reply with quote

I followed a children's recipe for making flapjack earlier. When it was cooked I decided to melt some plain chocalate and put that on top, but to add some flavour I added a splash of Cointreau -- the chocalate turned into a chalky paste immediately! Now I know why, thanks :-)
How would I flavour the plain chocolate without it seizing?
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2007 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

by bringing more water to the mixture..
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 3:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just saw Bobby Flay in his chocolate showdown. His chocolatier in his restaurant said to temper chocolate, bring it to 107F to melt, down to 80F then back up to 85F. Then dip. I guess this is a good startiing point for we amateurs.
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LA Writer
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:43 pm    Post subject: Chocolate & Marble Reply with quote

I actually studied tempering at pastry school a number of years ago, and your discussion of it is quite thorough. (Incidentally, I think the seed method is the best for the home cook.) I have a question I need answered for a short story I am working on: How many degrees below room temperature is the surface of marble, and why? If any of you analytical minds can answer that, I'd be grateful.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 6:59 am    Post subject: wax Reply with quote

Bee's wax might work better if your worried about toxicity of perefin as bee's is completely inert.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Mar 01, 2007 10:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Chocolate & Marble Reply with quote

LA Writer wrote:
I actually studied tempering at pastry school a number of years ago, and your discussion of it is quite thorough. (Incidentally, I think the seed method is the best for the home cook.) I have a question I need answered for a short story I am working on: How many degrees below room temperature is the surface of marble, and why? If any of you analytical minds can answer that, I'd be grateful.

Marble set at room temperature (like a slab build into a pastry counter) is the same temperature as the room. The marble however has a higher thermal conductivity than wood or glass, so it feels colder. The marble blocks are also thick and large which gives the sheet a large amount of thermal capacitance - meaning more heat would be necessary to raise the temperature of the block. Because of this, it acts as a good heat sink. If you had a thick slab of aluminum, it would feel cooler than the marble - but you'd need a pretty thick slab to prevent the aluminum from heating up rapidly as it absorbs heat from the chocolate.
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