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Recipe File: Anghelika's Tsatsiki (Tzatziki)
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CoverMe
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:18 am    Post subject: using Tzatziki Reply with quote

Hello from east San Francisco bay!!

Thanks for the site... i came across it looking for a recipe!!

Tonight I made an awesome Tzatziki using mint from my garden (and cucumber from Safeway!!) I made a bed of salad (dark greens, grated carrot, avocado, sunflower seeds, sliced apple, raisins, crumbled feta), tossed LIGHTLY with an Italian vinaigrette (made with apple cider vinegar and an extra teaspoon of raw honey). Then i thinly sliced some lamb and browned it in a skillet with some olive oil, S & P, and half an onion. After that had cooked and cooled a bit, I put the meat/onions over the top of the salad, then put the Tzatziki dressing over the meat. It was my own "recipe" (although a salad with meat on it really cant be called a recipe!!!) and it turned out SMASHING!! Rave reviews from the company, and i thought it was good too!!

This is the recipe for the Tzatziki that I made (although i didn't actually MEASURE per se... but its the general idea anyway...)

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon vinegar
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
1 cup Greek yogurt
1 medium cucumber, peeled / diced
2 teaspoons chopped fresh mint
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper

(I only had regular yogurt... i'm going to make my own, so i used some of my "starter" for this recipe... Greek yogurt is thicker... if i had had time, I would have put some cheese cloth in a colander, put the yogurt in there, and let it sit for 4-5 hours and drain/thicken.)

So... another use for this awesome sauce!!
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guest
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2007 6:39 pm    Post subject: yogurt for tzatziki Reply with quote

I have found that using Balkan Style 6% fat yogurt works wonderfully. I use a basket coffee filter in a strainer, over a bowl, to drain yogurt. i wrap the whole thing up in the fridge for 24 hrs and I get a nice thick dryish yogurt. Then I mix in the other ingredients, YUM!
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Kiki
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2007 1:57 am    Post subject: Tsatsiki Reply with quote

I make my own yogurt and then strain it to get something closer to the consistency of Greek yogurt (the homemade yogurt tastes more like Greek yogurt, and is just better than store-bought anyway). And I always add dill - that's how I grew up eating it, and I just prefer it that way. Very good on gyros or schawarma and much, much more.
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Guest
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 6:19 pm    Post subject: Straining Yogurt Reply with quote

I saw a top chef (Canada's Michael Smith) show great way to strain yogurt: place a COFFEE FILTER into a small strainer, suspend over a bowl, pour yogurt into the filter, place all in the fridge overnight - the result is beautiful thick yogurt
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I make tzatziki a lot and your recipe is similar to mine (although I use lemon juice instead of vinegar) but most of the Greek style yogurt you can get in the supermarket isn't strained but rather has thickening agents added (FAGE afaik is actually strained - but I don't think TJ's is). And unfortunately when you introduce the cucumber and the vinegar/lemon juice it ends up thinner than I like.

So I go ahead and strain the Greek style yogurt as well.
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EngineeringProfessor



Joined: 07 Sep 2006
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 3:15 am    Post subject: Go ahead, strain it. Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
I make tzatziki a lot and your recipe is similar to mine (although I use lemon juice instead of vinegar) but most of the Greek style yogurt you can get in the supermarket isn't strained but rather has thickening agents added (FAGE afaik is actually strained - but I don't think TJ's is). And unfortunately when you introduce the cucumber and the vinegar/lemon juice it ends up thinner than I like.

So I go ahead and strain the Greek style yogurt as well.


You can strain after the cucumber and juice. In fact, just mix the (regular) yogurt, cucumber and lemon juice (vinegar? eeech!) together and then strain until thick. Ummmm...

Remember, texture is just as important as flavor.
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GUEST
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We use this to make Tuna Salad... It makes a wonderful substitution for the Mayo... We use no-fat Greek Style yogurt from Trader Joes.
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bigpoppa



Joined: 16 Dec 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2007 4:41 am    Post subject: Great variations! Reply with quote

I just wanted to add that Fage yogurt is what I use and that its available at Whole Foods across the USA now. Since I am on a diet, I tried the 0% and the 2% versions this summer and found that it works amazingly well. Also the Savalas (that's right, "Who Loves Ya Baby?") family recipe uses lemon juice with a splash of vinegar.

As far as what to put in on, EVERYTHING!
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checkandmate
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2008 6:22 pm    Post subject: tsatziki??? hahaha... Reply with quote

Very creative imagination!!!This is the very Turkish dish "cacik".And "tsatziki" is the imitation version of pronouncing "cacik"Smile
Nevertheless it's a very good alternative of salads.U can serve it with every kind of meat meals and rice.
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Jady
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 12, 2008 6:14 pm    Post subject: Thank You!! Reply with quote

This is spectacular!! I went to Whole Foods and got the real Greek Style Yogurt, instead of 'draining' regular yogurt as I'd done before...

and...

OH MY GOSH!!

What a difference!! This is amazing, I cannot wait for my Greek Feast tonight! (Roasted Veggies with Feta and Olive Oil, Greek Salad with Oil-Cured Olives, Lamb and Beef Meatballs, and Grilled Flatbread... All with Tsatsiki, of course!!)

Thank you SOOO Much!!!
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vchan



Joined: 23 Apr 2008
Posts: 4
Location: Winnipeg, CA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A word to the wise for those who are making tzatziki, and something I discovered through trial and error.

Beware the gelatin!

When you're hunting a yogurt brand, and are planning on draining it to make yocheese, check the ingredients and be sure the brand of yogurt you buy doesn't have gelatin in it. The gelatin is added to keep the yogurt from seperating and to act as a thickening agent. Unfortunately that first part keeps you from being able to seperate it deliberately!


Something to watch for.
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an architect not engineer
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PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2008 2:17 am    Post subject: more on straining yogurt Reply with quote

if you have dietary restrictions (i.e. no fat!) and would like to strain non-fat yogurt, another suggestion for straining yogurt is to put a large paper coffee filter over a mesh strainer, set the strainer over a bowl (to catch all the water), dump the yogurt into the filter/strainer, then wrap the top of the bowl and strainer with plastic (to prevent refrigerator odors from being absorbed) and leave it overnight.

don't worry if you forget, as i have done many times, about the yogurt. if it gets too thick - i've left the thing for over a weekand the yogurt was the consistency of cream cheese - it just means that you don't have to squeeze the cucumber because you need to incorporate some liquid back into the yogurt.
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Jady
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2008 5:34 pm    Post subject: In response to Checkandmate's mockery of the term Tsatsiki.. Reply with quote

Quote:
The Greek word is derived from the Turkish cacık,[1] which means a form of chutney (cacık, the Turkish side dish with similar ingredients, is diluted).


From Wikipideia, at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tzatziki

The article is very interesting, and includes MANY variations of the recipe and usage.[/url][/quote]
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margerita
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 1:32 pm    Post subject: Tsatsiki Reply with quote

he he....

in an improvised situation i substituted cucumber for a winter melon.

result:

yummy.

Ray
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Cathy1284
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 13, 2008 6:35 am    Post subject: Thanks! Reply with quote

Thanks for the recipe! I love the tzatziki that I buy from the local farmer's market, and so I wanted to find a recipe to try to duplicate the great taste. This seem just about right. I'll be sure to give it a try - thanks for the easy to understand recipe!!
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