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Recipe File: Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookies
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 6:59 pm    Post subject: Re: Adding whey protein to cookies Reply with quote

nabel (guest) wrote:
Hi - just wondering if anyone would know how to add whey protein to the Chocolate Chip cookie recipe?

The problem is that whey protein often bakes up very hard. Many energy/protein bars balance this with significant amounts of fat to keep the bar moist and chewable - thus the classic texture of a protein bar. I haven't experimented with adding extra protein to cookies, so I can't comment on how that would be done while preserving the texture of the cookie.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 7:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Unsalted butter vs salted Reply with quote

ying wrote:
I live in Malaysia and here salted butter is more commonly used for baking. I'm wondering what is the difference between the results of unsalted and salted butter in the cookies?
Will it affect the texture of the cookies? Also what is the purpose of adding salt?

Don't worry - even here in the United States, salted butter is more popular than unsalted. The reason we call for unsalted butter in a recipe is because there's no way to know how much salt is in any brand or batch of salted butter. You can try to calculate this based on the Nutrition Information panel, but that's fairly inaccurate. Until butter manufacturers print just how much salt they are adding to their butter, you could end up with drastically different salt levels in your final baked good.

Lucky for us, unsalted butter exists. If we use unsalted butter we can manually add the required amount of salt to the recipe and there wouldn't be an issue of having excessive salt or too little salt.

The reason why salt is added to sweets like toffee or cookies is that it brings out extra flavor and sweetness without adding additional sugar or flavorings. A batch made without salt will taste somewhat bland in comparison to a batch made with salt (but too much salt makes it taste funny).
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mary mack
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2007 8:04 am    Post subject: Mrs. Field's recipe has baking powder Reply with quote

I used the free Mrs. Field's recipe from topsecretrecipes.com and the difference is that it uses half baking powder and half baking soda. I go the thick crispy exterior yet soft chewy hockey puck cookie that is a dollar or more retail. I also used my new mixer. When I tried the tollhouse recipe without the mixer, no one wanted to eat them. I ate about five of the hockey pucks today and feel a little nauseated.
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Guest






PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 3:54 pm    Post subject: Wheat flour and applesauce Reply with quote

Is there a healthy way to make chocolate chip cookies with wheat flour and applesauce? I would like to substitute wheat flour for the white flour, but am not sure if I am to use the same quantity. Thanks!
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kevand
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 7:11 pm    Post subject: Nestle Choc. Chip cookie enhancement Reply with quote

If you use half margerine and half crisco the cookies come out slightly thicker and I think tastier. I prefer much less (1/4 to 1/2 recipe) choc. chips too though that's personal preference.
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pastrychef1
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:09 pm    Post subject: vanilla Reply with quote

Please don't believe everything Cook's Illustrated says just because it's popular. I can't tell you how many things I have tried substituting that they have said is the best and there is just no way it works. One is Vanilla! I bought all the bottles they rated.. and let me tell you, nothing beats a real Mexican vanilla, which W&S now carries. Expensive? Not all that much more really than other quality brands, and well worth the extra money if you are using it in a recipe where the vanilla flavor is going to be prominant. I wouldn't use it in a chocolate recipe where it would be overpowered anyway. Most other recipes, I use McCormick's. Taste it for yourself..it is very close to the mexican vanilla sold at W & S .. just a tad bit not as strong. I won't use the word weaker..because it is by no means a weak tasting vanilla. It is just not as strong as the Neilson-Massey brand sold at Williams & Sonoma. Again..it does depend on what you are using it for. Different vanillas work better in different recipes...but for a real clear crisp vanilla flavor.. go w/Neilson-Massey's Mexican.
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Robin Goodfellow
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 3:40 am    Post subject: Why does salted butter have salt in it? Reply with quote

I have heard that dairies will add salt to a butter to cover the taste of impurities from not-quite-as-fresh-as-possible milk or cream. This could be an urban (or rural) legend but it sounds plausible to me.
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jtisdale



Joined: 07 Apr 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Apr 07, 2007 12:34 am    Post subject: Toll House in Australia Reply with quote

Hi all,

I've recently moved to Australia, and found that my tollhouse cookies come out very, very flat.

I've tried using different types of butter, and I've used many different ovens, but they never seem to come out right.

Any ideas?

Thanks
Jack
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Desperately Seeking Answe
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 1:13 am    Post subject: NEED Cookie Recipe for Extra Large Thick Cookies Reply with quote

Anyone know how to make the extra large cookie sizes we see in coffee shops?

I want to make these as gifts for friends and family.

I read that adding more flour can do the trick, but does this compromise the taste lost with the other ingredients? And, does the baking time or temperature also need to be altered?

Any tried and proven solutions would be greatly appreciated!
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As Alton Brown would ask, are you looking for a hard and crunchy, soft and chewy or cakey type of cookie? He did a show describing the three kinds. I might have that show saved in my archives. As I remember, variables were sugar type (brown vs regular vs Karo), shortening vs butter and flour amounts. Use large dollops of cookie dough and a lot of space between them on the pan. I don't recall temperature being one of the variables.

edit:
Here's the link to Alton Brown's three variations on Nestle Toll House cookies:

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1099&highlight=alton+brown+toll+house


Last edited by GaryProtein on Thu Aug 02, 2007 7:41 am; edited 1 time in total
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Replying to Gary
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 4:05 pm    Post subject: Making Thicker, Larger Cookies Reply with quote

Thanks Gary for replying.

I prefer the cookies to result in soft and chewy.

I was hoping to use my oatmeal cookie recipe. And this recipe includes light brown sugar.

I was also thinking that placing the cookie dough that's already been dropped on the cookie sheet in the fridge to firm it. Sometimes the dough can get too warm with the climate here in Florida and begin to melt some.
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blueskyecat



Joined: 13 Jun 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2007 1:29 am    Post subject: Freezing CCC dough Reply with quote

This is in response to the person who asked if anyone had frozen their own cookie dough before. I have and it's my favorite way of making chocolate chip cookies. It's a great help in controling portions as I can bake just enough to satisfy the immediate craving. I usually double my recipe (I use the butter/shortening recipe) and spread it out on a large baking sheet (12 x 18), freeze until firm, then cut into cubes. Transfer to another container or bag and put back in freezer. You do have to work rather quickly so the dough doesn't thaw out but it goes very fast. My grown daughter loves getting these frozen chunks of dough as a "gift" as she really hates to bake but loves the taste of freshly baked cookies. I have been doing this for more than 15 years and have never had a problem.
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cooking in Kansas
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:26 pm    Post subject: Thick & chewy Reply with quote

I've made more batches of chocolate chip cookies than I can count, since a friend told me to use the Toll House recipe, but add an extra cup of flour, to make them thick, instead of flat. I usually sift flour for most of my recipes, but was told for this particular one, to not sift. I use salted butter, and imitation vanilla. I generally use Nestle's Toll House semi-sweet chocolate chips, but have used Ghirardelli brand with excellent results. I haven't tried freezing the dough, but I do freeze the baked cookies if they won't be eaten within about 24 hours. I can tell the flavor starts to slip after a couple of days, if left at room temperature. (Non-finicky eaters might not notice the difference.) If the cookies will be eaten while still warm, you can bake them longer. But if they will be eaten after they've reached room temperature, it is better to underbake them a bit, to retain the moistness.
I've gotten lots of raves from the various groups who have sampled my cookies. (And my teenaged sons won't eat anyone else's homemade chocolate chip cookies!)
After baking so MANY batches of cookies, they aren't as tempting to me as they used to be. However, putting them in the freezer helps to ration them out, instead of letting my sons eat until they're miserable.
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liz
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:59 pm    Post subject: altitude Reply with quote

Doesn't altitude play a role in the outcome?
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2007 2:15 am    Post subject: Re: altitude Reply with quote

liz wrote:
Doesn't altitude play a role in the outcome?


Absolutely. At high altitude where water boils off faster, the cookie may dry out before the substance of the cookie is actually cooked if the oven temperature is maintained constant. We really need the expertise of a high altitude cook here. High altitude cooking is considered to be about 3500 feet plus or minus depending on who you ask.

see this google search result for high altitude cooking:

http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=high+altitude+cooking&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

As far as alititude (actually barometric pressure) is concerned, at sea level and standard temperature and pressure, the barometric pressure is close to 30"Hg and water boils at 212F. In Denver CO at 5200 ft, where the normal barometric pressure is about 24.5"Hg, the boiling point is about 202F. At Mt Everest at 29,000 ft, the barometric pressure is about 10"Hg, and the boiling point of water is about 175F. There is roughly a one degree F decrease in BP for every 540 feet in altitude. Above 15,000 feet this guide doesn't hold up well, but people don't generally live there.

The weather also plays a role in the boiling point of water. At sea level (New York, Miami, San Francisco) bad, rainy weather (29.5"Hg) may lower the boiling point one degree, in a hurricane (29"Hg) the boiling point is still around 210, maybe a little less in a stronger hurricaine where the barometric pressure is less, but weather doesn't play as big a role as altitude.
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