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Recipe File: Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookies
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks for reporting the "add a bit more flour" success!

I've not seen any decent descriptions of how to compensate for the no-transfat Crisco. certainly not any "food science" info - but I'll settle for practical methods to outwit the formulation changes.

when you think back to the ba-zillion recipes using Crisco, them's be a whole lotta' disappointed folks with the "new" stuff.
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Ann
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 4:05 am    Post subject: Nestles Chocolate Chip No Bake Cookies 1960's Reply with quote

I am wondering if anyone remembers from the 60's a no bake chocolate chip cookie that was on the toll house package. We called them Hot Rod cookies (maybe because they were so fast) anyway. Mom can't remember all the ingredients but it seemed like she was always making them. You cooked them on top of the stove and spooned them out on wax paper. They were lumpy and very delicious.

They had like 3 cups of sugar
Chocolate chips
Oatmeal
but don't remember the rest of the ingredients. Anyone out there remember???? Thanks Ann
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://southernfood.about.com/od/nobakecookies/r/bl90710a.htm

sounds suspicious >g<
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hollander
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 10:16 am    Post subject: Thanks! Reply with quote

I used 360 grams of flour, followed the recipe to the letter and the cookies turned out great! The single "creative" intervention was cca 2 grams of premium grade hash added to the mixture. First the resin was cooled and finely ground then added to one quarter of the butter melted in a double boiler. This was stirred untill all of the solid material dissolved and then blended with the mixture before beating in the eggs. The cookies do have a distinctive aroma and are very delicious. The only drawback of this excellent recipe is you probably shouldn't eat more than five or six of these if you were not planning a serious trip ^_^

The first batch gave me huge cookies, 13cm (5in) in diameter. For later batches I used smaller dumplings, 2,5 cm (1in) in diameter that spread nicely into 50 cookies with a diameter of cca 6cm (2+1/3in). Perfect : )
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FD
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 9:07 pm    Post subject: a couple of points Reply with quote

Since this is "for Engineers," I thought somebody should mention that sugars and flours will pick up moisture from the air --unless you get your flour straight out of the Mill and/or you house is kept at extremely low humidity. This moisture will, as exposure to humidity continues, throw the measurement by mass off more and more.

I've been playing with CCC recipes for years --my mother (a chocoholic) always made them "flat & hard," while a friend of mine's mother's were like muffin tops. (All good, but I now prefer more chewy, maybe not so many chips.)

I've played with applesauce, instead of fat [gives you something more like a dog biscuit or nature bar]. I've also done a lot of variations, replacing part of the flour with oatmeal or ground oatmeal [as long as you stay under 50% the taste difference is not noticeable]. These experiments were to make a better, better for me/you cookie.

I find that you can get softer cookies by reducing the baking temp by 25-75 F.

Lately, inspired by sites like this, I've been comparing recipes I find on-line, based on my preference, but pro-rated by cups fat/cup flours, cups sugar(s)/cup flours, and eggs/cup flours. (for example: 3x vanilla is a variation, not a whole new recipe)

The Toll house above, that began all this is 0.45 fat, 0.67 sugar, 0.89 egg. [0.34 fat, 0.51 sugar, 0.68 egg ---if you're weighing your flours, by his numbers]

A higher number means higher content, in proportion to the flour.

My current fav is 0.35 fat, 0.59 sugar, 0.47 egg. (link to it, below, although fat still seems a bit high, if you use low trans-fat...) The "1939" recipe ref'd above is 0.45 fat, 0.67 sugar, 0.68 egg.

I line old empty Al foil or plastic wrap boxes with plastic wrap, pack it solid, and freeze the dough. This gives it a very convenient size/shape ---I just slice off about 1 inch slices --which can then be cut into 2, 3, or 4 parts each, for baking.

My current favorite Soft recipe is [url]permalink[/url]

Hope my rambling helps somebody...
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>> This moisture will, as exposure to humidity continues, throw the measurement by mass off more and more.

holy cow. what happened to equilibrium?
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alex
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 1:18 pm    Post subject: Making mixing easier Reply with quote

If you have a Kitchen Aid, the following should help you out:

For creaming the butter and sugar together, use the paddle as the directions above suggest.

When it's time to add the flour mixture, change to the dough hook and put the shields on. Turn the mixer on the lowest setting or one notch up from this. Use a large metal spoon and spoon in the flour mixture one spoon at a time. This will keep the flour from getting all over the sides of the bowl.

Because of the shape of the dough hook, you can also add in the chocolate chips instead of mixing by hand - it won't smash them up like the paddle can.
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cookie madness
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 7:12 pm    Post subject: soft and chewy Reply with quote

Hello on this fine cooktober saturday: Best advise I've read so far, from the folks at the test kitchen["Cooks" mag.] MELT the butter and let cool, add one extra egg YOLK to the sugars mix, bake at only 325 for 10-15 minutes and let stand for 10[TEN] minutes before transfering to cooling rack. they will look un-done in the middle and just turning brown at the edges when you extract them from the oven, but will finish perfectly during the 10 minutes after. The extra egg yolk is because during the melting process some of the butter fat is lost, not sure why. I always refridgerate my cookies and still remain, bend in half-not break, chewy. And I also chill the dough as well. some times over night, mostly to make rolling the stuff in my palms much easier, Spoon?, scoop? to high-tech for me. Finally, melt the butter at only 10% power, sorry, Scotty, and keep an eye on it after the first 30 seconds taking it out before it's fully liquidified. And use good butter, and warm the eggs in hot water, and use more brown,cane, sugar, and stop talking with your mouth full, and put a couple thermometers in your oven , and use a jelly-roll l pan with parchment paper, and give some to your cranky neighbors, and use both powder and soda [3/1] and , and, oh yea, throw a bunch of toffee bits in there as well, and stop kicking the dog, and....oh never mind, just eat the damn things and go lay down in the hammock. Cheers,Louis
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strawberryb0tt0m
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 12:58 am    Post subject: half Reply with quote

Hi. I want to thank you so much for the unit conversions to grams, and your step-by-step with illustrations. Today is my 2nd day of baking, and these cookies turned out FANTASTIC! A little burnt on the edges, but nontheles fantastic! So thank you!!
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Guest
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2009 5:02 pm    Post subject: Easy Alterations Reply with quote

I like the Version Alton Brown has on the Food channel. Simply change the flour to Bread Flour and the white sugar to brown sugar. The Bread four produces more glutin and thus a more chewy cookie. Also the molasses in the brown sugar is highly hydroscopic and will actually pull in moisture from the air to make the cookie moist for a longer period of time. I also like to add a little Blackstrap or Fancy Molasses to add complexity to the taste.

These alterations work with most cookie recipies.
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Crazy Gran
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 2:05 am    Post subject: cost of homemade cookies Reply with quote

has anyone ever determined the cost per dozen or per cookie using the recipe on the back of the nestle chocolate chip bag?
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DeannaKeller
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 3:15 pm    Post subject: Have ingredients changed? Reply with quote

Hi, I have been making Nestle's Toll House cookies for the last 35 years. I was wondering have the ingredients (specifically the butter vs shortening) changed in the last 10 years. My cookies do not come out as good as they used to.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you are using "shortening" - yes it has changed with the transfat issues.

many bakers have reported different, typically not in a positive direction, results using 'the new Crisco' (for example)

butter has not changed....
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The original toll house chocolate chip cookie did NOT contain shortening. The use of shortening probably began as a wartime substitution. The original recipe, exactly as it was written by its originator, Ruth Wakefield, is copied below. Note that the cookies are not called "chocolate chip" yet; I imagine that was a Nestle marketing invention. And, 50 years before the famous New York Times chocolate chip recipe "invented" the technique, Wakefield advises refrigerating the dough overnight.

By the way, one reason for the wild fluctuations in textures and tastes readers are describing is because of the flour issue. Flour used in baked goods needs to be weighed because as the article points out, using cups and volume measurements is a very imprecise method, with the amount depending on which of the three general methods you use to measure it (sift, or spoon-and-sweep, or dip-and-sweep). Fortunately, more and more Americans are getting wise and buying kitchen scales. The other flour issue is its protein content. Gold Medal flour, with a protein content of about 10.5%, will create cookies that bake up much differently than, say, King Arthur flour, which has a protein content of 11.7%. Whether the flour is bleached or unbleached is yet another variable.

Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookies
from Toll House Tried and True Recipes by Ruth Wakefield, 1937, M. Barrows (New York)

Yield: 100 cookies

1 cup butter, creamed
3/4 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup white sugar
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon soda; dissolved in
1 teaspoon hot water
2 1/4 cup flour; sifted with
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup chopped nuts
12 ounces semi-sweet chocolate morsels
1 teaspoon vanilla

Cream butter. Add sugars and eggs. Dissolve baking soda in hot water. Add alternately with sifted flour. Add chopped nuts, chocolate morsels, and vanilla. Drop by half-teaspoonfuls onto greased cooky sheet. Bake in moderate oven, 375 degree F, for 10 to 12 minutes. Makes 100 cookies. At Toll House, we chill the dough overnight. When mixture is ready for baking, we roll a teaspoon of dough between palms of hands and place balls 2 inches apart on greased baking sheets. Then we press balls with finger tips to form flat rounds. This way cookies do not spread as much in baking and they keep uniformly round. They should be brown through, and crispy, not white and hard as I have sometimes seen them.
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linda540
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 3:29 am    Post subject: WHATS WRONG WITH MY COOKIES Reply with quote

i recently made these cookies, well i have been for the past 10 years. & this year my cookies were turning out horrible, i was not missing any ingredients and was following the directions correctly. This year they are brown and wrinkly, kind of like an old persons arm. I started to think that the recipe was changed, but realized it wasnt. i didnt get a new oven and been using the same ingredients. They just dont look like they used to. any suggestions would be great Smile thank you!

- linda Sad
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