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Kitchen Notes: Making Butter
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Fed Up
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 11:09 pm    Post subject: Re: butter that doesn't churn Reply with quote

Cowtown Wrej wrote:
When I said "find the dates" I meant signs, the moon passes through the signs of the zodiac and they influence the butter making, breadmaking, planting, fishing, etc. For example, today, November 11th of '08 the moon is passing through Aires. The moon is waxing and it will be full in a couple days.

You guys say you're engineers and "analytical". What bullshit. You're all just fucking psycho undereducated idiots who are living in the Middle Ages. I'm fed up with this site and it's promotion of outdated ideas and concepts. The internet really is an idiocracy!
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neeki
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 22, 2008 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

chill out dude. as you may have found out, anybody can post on the article forums, engineer or not. if you want cold hard science, then read the articles and forgo some of the comments.
or if it irks you so much, just stop using the internet altogether. it would be terrible for an intelligent, educated person like you to stumble across more drivel like this.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 3:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
On November 12, 2008 at 11:09 PM, Fed Up (guest) said...
Subject: Re: butter that doesn't churn

You guys say you're engineers and "analytical". What bullshit. You're all just fucking psycho undereducated idiots who are living in the Middle Ages. I'm fed up with this site and it's promotion of outdated ideas and concepts. The internet really is an idiocracy!
Hey buddy, I'm a fan of Randi and the skeptics, but

1) This a great site, full of helpful food science information and techniques

2) You sound like a delightful person, full of tolerance and warmth

3) Instead of ignoring the silly people, you crap all over the site
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dlovegrove
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2008 1:26 pm    Post subject: cream with additives can work Reply with quote

I tried this with a Land-o-Lakes heavy whipping cream, purchased at Sam's Club. The ingredients list was frightfully long, including carrageenan. It still worked wonderfully, although it took a while -- about 15 minutes in the mixer, and each step took longer than these directions indicated. Added a little finely-ground sea salt, and it was tasty. I ended up making english toffee with it. Yum.
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Dimples
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 6:22 pm    Post subject: gold top milk Reply with quote

While visiting a farm with my children last year we were wondering why there were a lot of people gathered round a tent shaking plastic cups(with lids on)
When we neared the tent we heard the farmer say and thats the butter forming at the top of the cup so keep shaking.
They were making the butter from gold top milk
Ive not tried making butter myself using gold top but thought I'd pass this info on.
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Katie
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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2009 4:11 am    Post subject: Time it takes for making butter Reply with quote

Hello, I just bought a cow share and tried to make butter from the cream off the top of the milk, but I couldn't get it to work. I used a kitchen aid mixer for about 40 minutes, so, I don't know if I simply didn't go for long enough or if accidentally picked up too much milk when I was skimming off the cream. Any estimates for how long I should mix until giving up?
thanks,
Katie
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1616
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2009 7:26 am    Post subject: Re: Time it takes for making butter Reply with quote

Katie wrote:
Hello, I just bought a cow share and tried to make butter from the cream off the top of the milk, but I couldn't get it to work.

You'll probably need to let that cream sit for a while and then lift the cream that forms from that. Usually cream that comes from the initial sitting/separation of milk is too low in fat to be churned into butter.
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amateur cook
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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 1:57 pm    Post subject: ultrapasteurized milk Reply with quote

Thanks for this website. After having looked at other websites, I made my first attempt to make butter. Actually, I was more interested in getting the buttermilk for baking, but I have also always wanted to make homemade butter. All I have available to me is store bought ultrapastuerized heavy cream (with additives), which was about to expire in 1 wk. Most sites recommend shaking the cream in a jar. I attempted this, and it just seemed to take a long time and too much energy without much progress. Next, I saw someone said he accidentally made butter using an ice cream maker as a churn. This also failed for me using my manually churned ice cream maker, perhaps because the cream was too cold (straight from the refrigerator), or I would have needed to churn for hours.

Finally, I looked at your website for troubleshooting, and decided to go to bed and let my churned cream sit in a glass mixing bowl (put a plate to cover, but make sure there is some air space) at room temp for 12 hours. Next day, using a electrical hand mixer, I varied the speed from medium to low for about 5 - 10 minutes (there is some minor splashing; remember my cream was semi-churned from the day before so if it was not already churned, it may require longer mixing time with the blender), then it instantly separated into whipped butter and buttermilk. I decided to use both this homemade butter and buttermilk to make my banana bread, and it turned out wonderfully.

For my next attempt at making butter, I hope to be able to skip the churning step. I will also experiment with letting the cream go past the expiration date for possibly better results and flavor because it seems like the longer the cream sits in the refrigerator, you start getting thicker cream on top. Based on this website, I may be able to skip waiting for the cream to get to room temp. When pouring the cream into a large mixing bowl, definitely tear open the carton and collect all the cream that sticks to the walls of the carton which is the primary component for butter you don't want to go to waste.

I am not a big fan of salted butter. I prefer unsalted butter. Once you get accustomed to unsalted butter, you don't want to go back to the adulterated form. The salt overpowers the delicious pure butter flavor. The dairy company wants to get you addicted and habituated to the salted butter because the salt helps the butter store longer. You never want to use salted butter for baking, or cooking for that matter, because it's harder to control your salt content, and can ruin the recipe.
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Happy Camper
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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2009 3:14 pm    Post subject: Ultra Pasteurized worked for me Reply with quote

I just made butter from Organic Valley Organic Heavy Whipping cream (ingredients are Grade A Cream and Carrageenan). After letting the cream sit overnight at room temperature, I was able to whip it into butter using my Kitchen Aid in about 5 minutes at medium speed. It happened so fast that I walked away to do something and it was butter before I got back! The additional steps (rinsing out the buttermilk, and herbing it - in this case with garlic, garden chives, salt/pepper) were an additional 30 - 45 minutes.

I would say that unless you have access to cheap cream, this is a pretty expensive way to make butter, but it tastes delicious!
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SeeversMJ
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 6:35 am    Post subject: cholesterol Reply with quote

Hi Michael

I appreciated your comments on cholesterol. Could you elaborate a little further on the good cholesterol and the bad cholesterol that we hear about in the light of your research? Where does it fit into the emerging picture? Thanks.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1616
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 8:59 pm    Post subject: Re: cholesterol Reply with quote

SeeversMJ wrote:
I appreciated your comments on cholesterol. Could you elaborate a little further on the good cholesterol and the bad cholesterol that we hear about in the light of your research? Where does it fit into the emerging picture? Thanks.

From what I've deduced from my readings, bad cholesterol is correlated with heart disease (such as atherosclerosis). As LDL levels rise, risk of heart disease and artery blockage increases. LDL is also found in the plaque that forms on the arterial walls in the case of atherosclerosis. However, increased risk does not indicate causation. There are studies that show that some populations with high LDL levels have a reduced incidence of heart disease. Some doctors believe there are other factors (genetic, etc.) and more or less ignore those studies as outliers. I currently believe that cholesterol levels should be used as an indicator - if you normally have low cholesterol levels and it increases, then there may be something causing the increase that should be addressed. The body naturally produces larger amounts of cholesterol when stressed (either physically or mentally) and the removal of these factors could do more to reduce the chance of heart disease (and subsequent reduction in bloodstream cholesterol content).
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Al
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 12:04 pm    Post subject: Buttermilk Reply with quote

Started making butter recently and love it, just haven't been using the resultant buttermilk. I understand that you can use it in recipes as a substitute for milk, but can I turn this into a substitute for buttermilk called for in recipes? If I culture the milk before I make the butter, will the resultant buttermilk be like the buttermilk called for in recipes? WHat about culturing the buttermilk afterwards such as in the recipes for making buttermilk from regular milk?
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realbutter
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2009 11:00 pm    Post subject: soymilk Reply with quote

This may be about cooking for engineers (@natalie) but trying to engineer butter by adding all manner of weird synthetic ingredients to the already highly-processed substance that is soymilk is really a far less elegant solution than simply making and eating real butter. If you are lactose intolerant, get some lactose-free milk. If you're a vegan, it's worth considering that while a vegan diet may be kind on animals, most vegan alternative foods are not kind to your body—full of chemicals, artificial ingredients and genetically modified crops (namely soy and corn). Eat real butter!
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 6:04 am    Post subject: thanks! Reply with quote

I'm so glad to find this site! My husband and I are buying heavy whipping cream from the local restaurant supply store. We cook a lot, and the bulk cream is cheaper.

After making butter from that for awhile, and then using store butter, I noticed that there was still a difference in the outcome. I realized from reading your site that we just weren't whipping it enough (didn't get to the buttermilk part---didn't know that there was even seperation involved!). Thanks for the detailed information, as well as pictures. I might look around your site more, and perhaps invest in a KitchenAide : )

Quick question: what is the chemistry behind the color change when you make butter?

Quick tip: did you know that 1 Tablespoon of sour cream can be substituted for 1 egg in a recipe?
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Guest






PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 10:31 pm    Post subject: The missing stage you mentioned was know as clabber Reply with quote

The stage where the butter forms was called clabbering when we made butter on the farm. Also, the more moisture (buttermilk) you can remove the longer you will be able to store the butter without it becoming rancid. We would place the butter globules in a shallow bowl and rinse it while pressing it to the sides of the bowl. Adding the salt as you do this also draws the liquid from the fat. We had a wooden bowl and wood paddle that facilitated this process. I'm a "senior" and am glad to see that some of the old skills are being re-discovered
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