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Recipe File: Clam Chowder, New England Style
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noahzark
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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 8:42 am    Post subject: thickeningnclam chowder Reply with quote

Afine Italian lady in Stamford Conn told me about 35 years ago what to do if my spaghetti sauce was too 'thin'. Her secret was to add a bit at a time of packaged instant potatoes, such a 'Hungry Jack'. She was right! It can be used to thicken many things, quickly and easily and does not impart a potato taste. n the case of clam chowder it is absolutely ideal.
Try it.
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theirah
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 4:08 pm    Post subject: bacon grease Reply with quote

would it be ok to substitute lard for the bacon grease?
I'm not very experienced at cooking yet, so still not sure what I can substitute for what...
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Theirah -

lard is rendered pork fat - so yes it can be a substitute.

bacon grease adds a bit of 'bacon flavor' - but actually any fat (butter, etc.) can be used.
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EccentricFox



Joined: 25 Jun 2008
Posts: 1
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 8:07 am    Post subject: o.O spices O.o Reply with quote

Heh... I always find that adding 1 clove of fresh minced garlic while simmering the potatoes give the chowder a nice little kick... Also try topping the finished chowder off with some lemon zest..
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2008 2:49 pm    Post subject: Chowdah Reply with quote

Can't resist sharing that my favorite restaurant clam chowdah flavah is Legal Seafood's. Tastes just as "New Englandy" at DC's National Airport as outside Providence Green Airport and also at Boston's on-the-wharf location - Family Guy
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mojotx
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 8:36 pm    Post subject: two cents from a Texan Reply with quote

As a true Texan, seasoned cook and lover of clam chowder I thought I'd share one minor addition that adds major flavor to any existing recipe. Fresh dill weed. I've been cooking great chowder for years and never new what was missing until I came across an idea to add fresh dill. I not only add a little to the stock, but also a sprinkling at the end. The first time I did this, I believe I over did it (be careful, a little goes a long way) but my guests to this day disagree, and rave over it. This herb really adds a fresh and flavorful element to an already great soup. I'm preparing a pot now for a friend's birthday, he'll be eccstatic.
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Broc Guillaume (Bill)
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 9:30 pm    Post subject: Clam Chowder Reply with quote

Smile French guy
living in Viroflay, near Versailles and Paris

I used to travel in the US, Boston, Salem, San Francisco, San Jose,
Washington, Baltimore , Annapolis, I love so much the country.
I will try the clam chowder i tasted in Boston and Frisco.
Thanks a lot
Bill
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Kimber
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2008 3:56 pm    Post subject: Portions Reply with quote

I made this recipe and it was great!! My husband loved it he's from the New england area and grew up on it.

My question is two-fold: if I wanted to make this for a group of people, do I simply follow the recipe and multily by 5? (Need to serve 30) Or make it in batches and follow the original recipe?

Also, in your opinion, would this be a good recipe to make, then take to a pot luck and reheat in a slow cooker?
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Kimber
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2008 3:59 pm    Post subject: Re: thickeningnclam chowder Reply with quote

noahzark wrote:
Afine Italian lady in Stamford Conn told me about 35 years ago what to do if my spaghetti sauce was too 'thin'. Her secret was to add a bit at a time of packaged instant potatoes, such a 'Hungry Jack'. She was right! It can be used to thicken many things, quickly and easily and does not impart a potato taste. n the case of clam chowder it is absolutely ideal.
Try it.


What a great idea, I will try it!!
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kIMBER
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2008 4:02 pm    Post subject: Blending flavors Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
My ten year old daughter and I just finished making the chowder. We made it for the soup course at our Thanksgiving dinner. We are allowing a few days for the flavors to blend together. But even though it hasn't had time for the flavors to blend , we both agreed that it was of the best chowders we have ever tasted. Thanks so much for the outstanding recipe and making cooking easy for a dad to do!


Silly question, how long is a good time to allow the flavors to blend? I made mine and we ate it right away, it was delicious, but I bet it would've been even better if I'd made it the night before....
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2008 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kimber -

not sure the New England style needs a lot of "flavor melding" time - as opposed to the Manhattan style which needs to extract/blend the leafy herbs and vegetable.

I should think a hour, perhaps two is max. benefit. depending on the potato you use (hi/lo starch, there's a debate...) making it too far ahead and holding it could result in unintentional thickening as a starchy potato breaks down.
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Kimber
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2008 2:20 pm    Post subject: Quantity Cooking Reply with quote

In order to cook this delicious chowder for about 30 people, should i make it in batches (following the recipe above) or can I multiply the measurements X 5?

Thanks.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2008 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

..batches me thinks.

in a home kitchen, you'll probably use something like a stock pot. the problem with one huge batch is a small heating area (the pot bottom) to a tall volume. even with stirring I would not expect an even heating throughout the pot - given it's a something viscous mix.

two large diameter pots would be my approach . . .
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sjh
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:16 am    Post subject: recipe Reply with quote

made this recipe for about 30 of my nearest and dearest. We just made the whole recipe times 5. Huge pot. It worked fine. Greatest chowder I've ever made; used Yukon gold. Yum.
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lexkyphil
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 1:17 pm    Post subject: Chirico-wtf is it? Reply with quote

What is chirico? It was mentioned in one recipe as an equivalent to bacon. I have never heard of it and cannot find any definition on the web other than an Italian painter whose works look like he copied Salvador Dali. Help, anyone?

Phillip in Lexington, KY
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