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Recipe File: Buttercream Frosting (American)
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novice
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2006 8:59 pm    Post subject: buttercream Reply with quote

Is there anyone who can suggest how to determine 160F without a thermometer in order to follow Michael's recipe?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2006 6:43 am    Post subject: Re: buttercream Reply with quote

novice wrote:
Not having the thermometer anymore, can you sugest an approximation of when 160? (Emeril Lagasse has a buttercream that uses sugar and corn syrup heated till disolved). I would like to follow Michael's and your suggestions.

The 160°F is used to make sure any salmonella that may be present in the eggs is killed effectively. The current number that is quoted for salmonella infections is 1 in 10,000 eggs consumed (and most of these cases are in restaurants), so if you're certain of the safety of your eggs - then go ahead and simply heat until everything is smooth and the sugar dissolved into the egg.
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bakermaniac
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2006 6:37 pm    Post subject: alpine shortening Reply with quote

I've been searching the web for some buttercream frostings and found this forum. I am planning on baking a cake for my daughter's debutante ball. I have made the wilton buttercream frosting and would like to try other recipes because I don't really like the wilton. I would like to try the recipes that you have posted in this forum, but have a question. I found a recipe that asks for alpine shortening. It claims that the frosting comes out very creamy without the overly sweet taste. Have any of you tried alpine shortening in your recipes? Would I be able to use it when making the italian or french buttercream frosting, and would I be able to incorporate cream cheese into the frosting? Please help.
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LazyCook
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 12:28 am    Post subject: What kind of kitchenAid mixer you are using.. watts 250? Reply with quote

I planning to buy a KitchenAid mixer but their are different watts 250, 350... and so on. I am a novice baker. plz help Cool
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 5:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've made this recipe twice now (the second time to make sure I didn't screw up the recipe) and did everything to a t and it still doesn't come out right.
It tastes wonderful, but it just doesn't hold...both times it starts to seperate. I live at 7000 feet and I know that has effects on the baked goods, but I wasn't sure if it would effect the buttercream or if I just need to keep practicing to get it right.

Any suggestions would be great!

Oh...and yes I've beaten it until my kitchenaid motor almost died...

-amber
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Jennifer
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2007 7:22 pm    Post subject: Butter Cream Frosting Reply with quote

When making the American Butter Cream frosting, is it necessary to use the flat beater attachement? The mixer I have to use is a hand mixer with the regular beater.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2007 8:55 pm    Post subject: Re: Butter Cream Frosting Reply with quote

Jennifer wrote:
When making the American Butter Cream frosting, is it necessary to use the flat beater attachement? The mixer I have to use is a hand mixer with the regular beater.

Regular beater is fine.
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Ami
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:39 pm    Post subject: novice questions Reply with quote

I'm considering to use this buttercream frosting recipe, but there are a few things I'd like to know:

1. Does this recipe make buttercream stable enough to make icing roses?
2. How long can it be refrigerated?
3. Do the eggs need to be room temperature?
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Ami
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:04 am    Post subject: cont'd Reply with quote

4. Can the recipe be cut in half for smaller cake recipes?
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AnMochi
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 12:14 am    Post subject: halving recipe Reply with quote

For Ami: Yes. I have successfully quartered this recipe. Halving it should be no problem. Have also flavored the recipe with chocolate bars melted with part of the butter and cooled. (white chocolate was fabulous!)
About the eggs: room temp (or slightly warmer) eggs will blend together more easily.
It is firm enough to pipe rosettes and things like whipped cream, but if you want something harder, you might try fondant or marzipan.

I really like this recipe: sweetness is just right for me and I have been able to halve and quarter it (here in Japan cakes tend to be smaller, but the standard frosting is whipped or chantilly cream,) as well as flavor it easily. I much prefer the satiny smoothness to the slightly grainy and very sweet uncooked kind with confectioners sugar-- The one difficult thing is not to get distracted while cooking the eggs on the double boiler, my biggest problem when doing stirred custard, pastry cream, and genoise. Wink

Happy baking and a big "Mahalo" to Michael Chu for this versitile recipe.

Aloha,
AnMochi
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total amateur
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 1:27 am    Post subject: My holy graille in baking - a great frosting! Reply with quote

Please help me! I have been looking for a kick-butt frosting recipe for YEARS. I tried several buttercream recipes (including the original recipe above as well as several recipes from the The Cake Bible), only to be really disappointed when they turned out like really sweet butter. I know, I know - it's BUTTERcream, but I don't normally put butter on chocolate cake. A couple bakeries near me in Wisconsin (Bay Bakery and Simma's Bakery) have these great frosting recipes that are sweet and rich, and yet don't taste like sticks of butter. I'm sure they aren't about to give out the recipes, though. Does anybody have anything for me to try that isn't 7-minute frosting, white mountain frosting, cream cheese frosting, or cooked frosting (I'm skeptical of cooked frosting b/c someone I know makes it and it tastes like the stuff I frost sugar cookies, not cakes, with.)?
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hovsm
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 5:00 pm    Post subject: spacial_k Reply with quote

spacial_k. You do realize that school is meant to be a foundation. Just because you didnt learn it in school, doesn't make it incorrect. Not only that, every school is different. If you don't move beyond your schooling and get a bit of experience, then you make ignorant statements like you just have. I have seen a plethora of recipe's from world class chef's, that use egg yolks in their French buttercream's. Oh wait but you didnt learn it in school. Here is what you need to know about school. It isnt doctrine, it isnt infallable, and you are supposed to take that BASIC information and get valuable experience. I get the impression that under your logic one could say this "A soldier goes to basic training and their schools to learn to fight, so they should know exactly what happens when they go to war".........WRONG. That is why experience beats schooling every time.
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AnMochi
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 11:48 pm    Post subject: for Total Amateur Reply with quote

How funny: I found this site, searching for a good buttercream and you came here looking for other frostings. Have recently started baking more cake and found this site really helpful. They have several frosting recipes you might try-- there is even an all Crisco recipe!

http://www.baking911.com/cakes/101.htm

Click on "recipes" and then, "cakes-fillings, frostings, & glazes." Hope you find something you like.

Aloha,
AnMochi
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Total Amateur
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 1:42 am    Post subject: thanks AnMochi! Reply with quote

I just checked out the website you mentioned above. It looks pretty promising. As soon as I have a functioning kitchen (remodeling) and an ability to taste (a neverending cold) again, I'll have to give some of the recipes a try :o). So how do you like the buttercream recipe listed above? Doesn't it taste like whipped butter to you? No offense to the author - apparently most people love this frosting. I guess I'm just crazy like that. Well, thanks again!
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mac chan



Joined: 26 Feb 2007
Posts: 1
Location: ASIA

PostPosted: Mon Feb 26, 2007 5:41 am    Post subject: HELP PLEASE!!!!!! Reply with quote

i made a cake for myn friend's aunt. it's her 50th birthday. apparently i used buttercream made of sugar( boiled at 250 F)eggwhites, butter. it melted after 6 hours, before she even blew the cake! i'm totaly desperate right now for the most stable buttercream recipe thAT will withstand room temperature for at least 7 hours! help help me.... i need to make up for that...
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