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Recipe File: Dark Chocolate Souffle
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malweth



Joined: 30 Sep 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2007 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I doubled it... the recipe came out fine for my first try (it could have cooked longer, perhaps), but it was far TOO chocolatey. I realize what I'm saying, but stick to smaller ramekins for this one - the 4.5" one (about 10 oz?) was too much for me. I'll be modifying for less chips next time.

I poured a Creme Anglaise into the souffle after cooking. The Anglaise was modified with a fist-full of chips (I used the 60% Ghiardelli). I also used dashes of Grand Marnier and Godiva Liquors in the Anglaise.
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Paul
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 5:26 am    Post subject: Cream of tarter Reply with quote

In answer to a question above, I read earlier tonight that the cream of tarter in the egg whites adds acidity and tends to toughen them a bit, so they are less fragile.
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Paul
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 5:30 am    Post subject: What if Reply with quote

What happens to the souffle if you add too much (and you get the other ingredients right):

Chocolate?
Egg yolk?
Sugar?
milk?

What if you add too little of each?
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 10:44 pm    Post subject: Large size choco souffle?? Reply with quote

I am making tomorrow a LARGE size chocolate souffle... as i don't have any small ramekins!!

I am very hopeful that it will turn out alright... but have no idea.

if anyone has any experience w/ this please let me know! If it is a total disaster I will go buy some (albiet grudgingly!). I think the souffle dish i have woudl be a 4xrecipe size... so it will be 8 eggs, etc etc... quite large... it is for a lot of people and well, we'll see...

If no-one responds (which i hope they do!!!) I'll post my results... and if they do respond and i am encouraged to try it i'll post my results!! Could be interesting...

Thanks
Anne

Teasing
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Guest






PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2007 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Oh and what is the tartar cream? do they have it at regular grociery stores?

The purpose has been explained above, but as for what it is and where to find it -- cream of tartar is a white powder that you'll find in the baking aisle or spices section of most grocery stores. It's actually a biproduct of fermenting grape juice, so I don't know why they call it a "cream", but there you have it.
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2007 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When i made this recipe, i used a large ramekin..it turned out fine, if a little soft in the center.
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Linda O
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 11:42 pm    Post subject: Chocolate Souffle Reply with quote

Thank you! My first souffle and it was bliss.
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chefperson
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 3:51 pm    Post subject: alternatives to ramekins? Reply with quote

i don't own any ramekins at home...would it be possible to use another container to bake it in? like erm....cupcake liners?

and also, is it ok to omit the cream of tartar?
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Guest






PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 7:29 pm    Post subject: Silicone Reply with quote

I know that souffles are usually baked in ceramic ramekins, but I have silicone muffin cups. Does anyone know if that will work, or if the heat transferring power of the ceramic is important.

Thanks.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 8:18 pm    Post subject: Re: alternatives to ramekins? Reply with quote

chefperson wrote:
i don't own any ramekins at home...would it be possible to use another container to bake it in? like erm....cupcake liners?

and also, is it ok to omit the cream of tartar?


The easy one first - yes you can omit the cream of tartar. That helps you beat the eggs whites without overbeating / having them begin to collapse, but you can do it without the acid.

As to the cupcake liners, I don't know - never tried. Supposedly, ceramic ramekins are important due to several reasons. 1) They heat up slowly, 2) retain a lot of heat so they cool slowly, 3) have fluted sides so they have more surface area to absorb heat (this seems like it's probably not going to contribute too much).
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Christa
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 6:17 pm    Post subject: Dark Chocolate Souffle Reply with quote

Great consistant Recipe ! I have made this many times and always get great results .I love that you can make ahead .Always rises . Last week I added finely grated orange zest (actually added another facet to an already nice recipe )
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ashwe7
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2008 12:45 am    Post subject: yummyyyyyy Reply with quote

Big smile This was absolutely wonderful!!! Very very yummy, thank you for the recipe and clear directions.
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Sahr
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 6:01 pm    Post subject: LOVE THIS RECIPE!!!! Reply with quote

awesome recipe!! i'm a huge fan! i went and bought the ramekins especially for this recipe and yeah i even got an electronic weighing scale for my birthday after reading your article on diff kinds of weighing scales! Big smile
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Sue
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 5:53 am    Post subject: Altitude Reply with quote

I just tried this recipe on a whim in a city where the altitude is 5000 feet and it worked out great! I turned the oven to 350 though, to account for the difference in altitude.
We used Baker's bittersweet chocolate and found it extremely chocolatey - any suggestions for how to turn down the chocolate?
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tanima.chax



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 1
Location: INDIA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 20, 2008 2:27 pm    Post subject: Substitute Reply with quote

Is there any substitute for cream in the recipe?
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