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Sauerkraut/Pickled vegetables in general

 
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Analyticman



Joined: 05 May 2006
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2006 1:03 pm    Post subject: Sauerkraut/Pickled vegetables in general Reply with quote

Sauerkraut and NY-style pickles are delicious, and can be made easily. (Also lots of Asian kinds of pickled stuff, such as kim chee.) If anyone wants any recipes please respond to this and I will post some.

Broadly speaking, there are 2 kinds of "pickling". There is pickling (i.e., preserving) using vinegar, and pickling that ferments vegetables using the sugars in them.

I just tasted 2 batches of sauerkraut that I've made, and they are delicious. I've been making fermented NY deli-style pickles (no vinegar!!) for a long time, and they're even easier to make.

I have not yet had the success I seek with kim chee, but I'm making progress.
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jimjimjim9



Joined: 18 Jul 2005
Posts: 29

PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2006 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bring it on, Analyticman! Successful and reproducible pickling procedures would be greatly appreciated.

Especially interested in cukes and kraut salt fermentation.
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Thor



Joined: 24 Jul 2006
Posts: 112
Location: Camp Hill, PA

PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 7:24 pm    Post subject: Sandorkraut Reply with quote

A pro micro organism site with an excellent description for making sauerkraut.

http://www.wildfermentation.com/

I'd like to try it, but my wife won't let me ferment anything indoors.
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Lintballoon



Joined: 08 Oct 2006
Posts: 42
Location: Massachusetts

PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2006 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
I also got "Wild Fermentation" because of a craving for good sauerkraut. I have it brewing (and stinking up the kitchen) I'm only three days into it, so don't know what the result will be. At the same time, I also put up a batch of "Sauerruben" which is turnips treated the same way, in salt with the brine expressed from the turnip. Though I've had sauerkraut plenty of times, the only time I've had pickled turnips was from a lebanese restaurant, and they were great! Crunchy and a bit sweet. I am hoping that is what I'll get here. Have you tried using turnip with any sucess?
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jimjimjim9



Joined: 18 Jul 2005
Posts: 29

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 2:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neat. This is the time of year to do it. I'm hoping to do some in the next 2 weeks as our local fall cabbages start to come in. I've looked at a few places that say"make your own kraut", and the methods vary greatly. I've got some jars and plastic barrels ready, but waiting on cabbages and also the final decision on procedure.

What was your method?

Jars/crock/plastic barrel?

What kind of cabbages/turnips?

Cutting/Pounding?

Percent of salt?

Cover: fermentation lock? Bag? Rock? Cloth?

Temperature of area for fermentation?

How do you plan to store the results? Can? Keep raw in fridge? Freeze?

How many pounds did you make?

Gosh... lots of questions. Hope that you can share your experience.
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Lintballoon



Joined: 08 Oct 2006
Posts: 42
Location: Massachusetts

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 11:33 am    Post subject: 'Kraut Reply with quote

Here's what I did:
I got 2 big old fashioned clear glass cookie jars (so I could see what happens)
All the recipe calls for is the vegitable and salt! I got a cheap mandoline, which is a hand operated slicer. It worked well with the turnip (a rutabega from the farm stand) but it was useless for the cabbage.
I used sea salt without any additives, like iodine.
You finely chop the cabbage as for cole slaw, and toss it in a bowl with salt in layers. I didn't measure, just chucked in a big pinch at each layer. Then I packed it into the cookie jar, pressing it down with my fist and with a potato masher. I only used one head of cabbage. One cabbage filled the jar to the top. The recipe claimed that the juice of the cabbage would cover the sliced veggie. I was doubtful, but I covered the cabbage with a water-filled jar for a weight, and kept squishing it down every fifteen minutes or so. Low and behold, the cabbage did express enough liquid to cover. I had some (britta filtered, you don't want floride or chlorine) salt water on hand in case it didn't. I also covered the whole thing with a cloth to keep out bugs and stuff.
The procedure was the same for the turnip. I used the mandolin to slice it into popsicle stick sized slices, tossed it with salt and pressed it into the other (smaller, I'd say pint and a half) jar. The turnip released a lot more juice a lot easier.
That was now four days ago. I just did a taste test in your honor. Both brews still taste pretty much like fresh, there is a slight sauery taste. The brine is quite salty, I probably should have measured. (Recipe calls for 3 tablespoons per 5 pounds of cabbage)
What am I going to do with all that stuff? I DON"T KNOW!
I will definately store it in the fridge once it has done it's thing (about 2 weeks)
Eating raw fermented foods is supposed to be really good for you, so I will probably avoid cooking it.
One really great way to use fresh sauerkraut, and similarly fermented barsht (beets) is like this:
Mix the two together with a bit of olive oil. Shred some proscutto. Pile the veggies on some sourdough bread, top with the proscutto, and then top with mozzarella cheese. Very yummy, and also pretty with the red cabbage and beets topped with the pink proscutto and the white mozzarella.
I will also probably make cabbage soup using fresh cabbage and then put the 'kraut in at the last minute before serving to keep its culture alive.
Beware: the kitchen does have a distinctly cabbagy odour. I wouldn't do this if I were expecting guests.
My biggest hurdle was actually finding something to weigh the stuff down with that fit into the jars.
Give it a try and let me know how it goes!
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jimjimjim9



Joined: 18 Jul 2005
Posts: 29

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2006 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks. The rutabagas sound really neat.

Cabbage odor is like a KitchenAid ad: it says "here lives a cook." Smile
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