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Recipe File: Meat Lasagna
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael, I did as you asked. I posted the original recipe of Lasagnas in some (more o less difficult) different variants.
I posted also the recipe to prepare at home the bechalme sause: you NEED it for your original italian Lasagna (even if the bechalme sause was originally a french sauce: but in the last centurys italian and french cultures has strongly mixed themselves each other in the questions of cooking.
But everything I posted is in italian. Sorry, but if yu have problems you can try to ask to me.

Fulvio
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TI-Philippines Webmaster
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lasagna without bechamel or bechamella is no lasagna at all, except maybe a US/american version of a fake lasagna. Bechamel is just milk, butter and flour, mixed very slowly on a pna in low heat....till it gets some density - easy

Also a dash of nutmeg or italian white trouffle is needed for a superb taste
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

American Lasagna? Yes. Fake lasagna? Well, when that much cheese, meat, pasta, and more cheese hits my stomach, it sure doesn't feel fake.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

what about updating recepies to measures in the international units system?
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never been the lasagna lover, and for that matter a lover of anything swimming in tomato sauce. When my boyfriend started making cheese at home, however, I found myself with mountains of it everywhere. Incidentally, I came across this posting and happened to have all the ingredients. I used a little less sauce in my meat and cooked it for about 10 minutes longer. It turned out, fantastic, completely out of this world, can't wait to do it again. Thanks.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone try this with ground turkey?
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bechamel is really quite easy if you do it regularly. it is usefull for all sorts of things: macaroni and cheese, curry sauce, a la king sauce, and of course lasagne. it takes a half-hour to get it right but its a low-attention preparation as long as you stir regularly to prevent a skin from forming. so you could make it while working on the meat sauce. just stubstitute bechamel for cream, nix the ricotta, and combine parmesan with regular layers and this recipie works fine as a bechamel lasagne. bechamel is 2 tbsp flour and 2 tbsp butter on medium heat until fragrant but not brown, add 1.5 cups milk slowly to avoid clumps, add 1/2 onion with a bay leaf stuck into it with 2 cloves, cook on medium-low (never boil) for 20-30 minutes until thick and remove onion. should be thick, creamy, and a little sweet.
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Oded Sharon
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't really like ricotta cheese, so I used cottage cheese instead, same quantities. It came out wonderful.
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sonia
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whoa... Much effort put into the table codings (HTML) especially! Cool!
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bechemawho?...Italian AMERICAN lasagna,like Italian american pizza is far superior to anything those raw pig eating butt pinchers are eating
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm Australian, and Lasagne (note spelling) over here is a basic (bolognese) meat sauce layered between a series of lasagne sheets, with bechamel sauce on the top layer with only a very small amount of parmesan cheese sprinkled on the bechamel.
Bechamel is a basic white sauce with a bit of nutmeg in it: melt a small amount of butter in a saucepan over low heat, add cornflour, stir into a paste with a wooden spoon, add cold milk, stir continuously until it starts to thicken, remove from heat, add a sprinkle of nutmeg and some black pepper if desired.
If you served me the greasy lasagne from your recipe, I'd be horrified at the horrendous fat content. It would make me ill.
Lasagne does NOT have to be fatty. Ask your butcher to mince some very lean beef for the meat sauce. DON'T EVER use sausages (very fatty). You can even use low-fat milk in the bechamel. And the only cheese in the dish is the small amount of parmesan on top.
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ThesOupFeinD!!
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

leave your brain when you leave. I have this great idea for this new soup! It's GREAT!!
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is basically an extension of the Great Pizza Controversy that us americans have with british people. British people are closer to Italy so they like Italian style pizza, which as a person who has been to Italy a few times, I can say is totally different than american pizza.

My guess is this- both American Pizza and Lasagne are probably parallel evolutions to the Italian variety.

What happened was Italians came to the USA and tried to recreate their own food using local ingredients, maybe partly because they used what was at hand and partly because they liked some native ingredients more. In addition, some of the Italian versions are probably more recent inventions.

Neither is "right" or "proper", they just have different historical contexts.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i was wondering michael, if you made half serving of this recipe, should you bake it half the time too?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

re: half serving

You probably cannot halve the cooking time. Most likely you can shorten the cooking time to about 10-12 min. covered followed by 20 min. uncovered.
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