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Recipe File: Cooked Egg Nog
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ktexp2



Joined: 03 Nov 2005
Posts: 34

PostPosted: Fri Jan 06, 2006 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In this case, I think we are pastuerizing the eggs! Sort of. The practice of bringing the mixture up to 160 degrees F for a few minutes then cooling almost immediately after. I used to do this every morning and evening to a large pot of goat's milk!

As for raw eggs, I have been eating raw cookie dough and cake batter for as long as I remember. Never seemed to bother me. I still do it, although I always think about it afterwards. Never really thought about when I was younger, but then again, we had chickens who laid eggs for us so we knew they were healthy.

As for alcohol, didn't someone come out with a study that ethanol actually promotes bacterial growth?
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Guest
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 8:22 pm    Post subject: Best Before Date Reply with quote

It says on the recipe that the eggnog should be served within 24 hours of making it. Is this a time frame that should be followed closely or mearly a suggestion if you want to drink fresh eggnog. Is there any way to make the drink keep longer because I would be making it for only myself and I would not want to consume it all in a single day.


Thanks, nm
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 1:30 am    Post subject: Re: Best Before Date Reply with quote

Guest wrote:
It says on the recipe that the eggnog should be served within 24 hours of making it. Is this a time frame that should be followed closely or mearly a suggestion if you want to drink fresh eggnog. Is there any way to make the drink keep longer because I would be making it for only myself and I would not want to consume it all in a single day.

I would suggest making the recipe in smaller quantities - it is a bit harder to do because there's so little substance, but you are using barely cooked eggs. I would consume it within the first two days even so.
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elle
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2006 11:05 pm    Post subject: Cleaning your eggs... Reply with quote

Just an FYI...

I'm in veterinary school and we recently in a class that discussed egg production. I was interested to find that washing your eggs with water is not the best way to clean your eggs. In washing eggs with water (cold/warm/ whatever), it actually allows the toxins and bacteria on the outside of the egg to diffuse INTO the egg itself! Basically, by washing the egg you are contaminating the egg even more.

Thus the question, how DO you clean a dirty egg?

Use fine sandpaper and buff the outside of the egg to remove any foreign material, and then wipe off with a dry cloth. Your egg is now ready to use.

Just thought I'd pass this along to fellow science-minded people. Pass it along! Smile
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Guest






PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2006 6:14 am    Post subject: Light and Fluffy eggnog Reply with quote

I'm a fan of light and fluffy eggnogs, rather than the more milky concoctions like this or the store-bought stuff. AB's eggnog recipe is closer to the one I use, but where he stirs in the merangue, I fold. Also, he adds the heavy cream directly to the custard, while I whip and fold that as well. I got this recipe from my mom, and all of my friends have loved it. It turns out very thick, light, and fluffy, but since that's what I grew up with, that's what I expect eggnog to be. Very rich, like drinking a slice of pie.


Key differences:

* The milk is scalded first, and the eggs are tempered into it (avoids curdling the egg this way. Run the custard through a strainer once it's cooked to get rid of any egg that may have curdled.
* Egg whites are whipped into merangue and folded in
* Cream is whipped stiff and folded in

I also like to split and scrape a vanilla bean while cooking the custard, and straining will help you easily retrieve the bean when you're done. If I'm making it hard, I'll put the whiskey or brandy into the custard base before folding in the merangue and cream, so that the alcohol gets suspended in the foam rather than sinking to the bottom of the cup. Finally, don't forget the fresh nutmeg (not the pre-ground canned stuff, please!)
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tomophonic
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2006 2:31 am    Post subject: adding alcohol Reply with quote

I've been making various raw and cooked eggnogs for a long time. Here's one rule I follow: add the alcohol shortly before drinking your nog; if you make more than you're going to serve that night, store it without the booze.

I may be mistaken, but I swear I've cooked my eggs in alcohol while they sat in the fridge, so stopped pouring the liquor into the batch. Besides, some folks prefer bourbon, some cognac, some rum ... one friend of mine likes to use Amaretto. (That's a real sweet tooth.) And some will want no alcohol at all - I make my nog with beaten whites and whipped cream, so I thin the "virgin" nogs with a little milk.
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christenmu
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2007 2:52 am    Post subject: A suggestion for recipes that calls for raw eggs Reply with quote

Use either a double boiler or you can also use a stainless steel bowl place on top of a boiling pan, beat the eggs and a small amount of milk or cream to avoid curdling. When the eggs mixture started to thicken, remove from the double boiler or boiling water.
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devalinas
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2007 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about using pasteurized eggs? they are just a wee bit more expensive. And considering you make this once a year as a seasonal dish.
Also, perhaps a bit of rum can be whisked in at the end for flavor?
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Asphyx
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 10:00 pm    Post subject: Washing eggs Reply with quote

Just wanted to say that washing the eggs isn't good. The shell is poreus, if your eggs ever get wet, you pretty much wanna use them right away or just toss em out.
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2008 7:57 am    Post subject: more evidence that egg nog goes better with booze Reply with quote

according to this video the alcohol content of finished egg nog is around 20 percent which was to high for typical bacteria to thrive.
however they did purposely contaminate the sample, with salmonella an enteric bacteria which causes food poisoning, the salmonella was able to thrive in both the homemade eggnog and the store bought.
still put my mind to rest further testing is needed but the alcohol does kill most of the bacteria.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=98499891&ft=1&f=1007
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John
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2008 6:53 pm    Post subject: Runny Reply with quote

My batch came out very runny, even after lengthy refrigeration. I used two cups and two cups, followed the instructions to the letter. Anyone else have this problem? Would it be better to use half cream and half milk?
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Howard



Joined: 21 Nov 2005
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I whisked the first mixture in a double boiler until it hit about 160F and the whole thing was a scrambled mess Sad Had to pour it all out.

Guess I'll have to do it again with the spoon method.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 19, 2009 1:15 am    Post subject: salmonella in eggs Reply with quote

It used to be that eggs got contaminated with salmonella on the outside, from contact with fecal bacteria. If you've raised laying hens you know that they have one 'vent' through which both waste and eggs emerge. In the past several years, the salmonella enteritidis strain has been found inside intact, disinfected, grade A eggs. This type of germ contaminates eggs inside a hen's ovaries, before shells are even formed. It's a very small proportion of the eggs sold in the US, but at least be informed.
Since it's that time of year coming up, I thought people should be aware.
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BeachBoz
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 26, 2010 11:00 pm    Post subject: Sit for 2-3 weeks Reply with quote

There have been some scientists who've tackled the safety of drinking eggnog and the petri dishes have shown that all salmonella will disappear sometime between 2 and 3 weeks in the fridge. See the video here: http://www.sciencefriday.com/videos/watch/10262.
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moiaussi47



Joined: 12 Jun 2011
Posts: 1
Location: Huntington Beach, CA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2011 4:17 pm    Post subject: recipe chart Reply with quote

so happy I found you and to have a safe egg nog recipe!

just have to say, I may not be an engineer but does Capricorn count 'cause I love and appreciate the chart of the recipe! thanks.
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