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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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Tmone75
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 6:16 pm    Post subject: Perfect every time Reply with quote

I use this site every Year for Christmas Eve as a point of reference. The Prime Rib turns out PERFECT every single time. 200 degrees sounds low, but dont question it. It will come out PERFECT medium Rare everyone! Love this site!
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Hoffted
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2016 4:22 pm    Post subject: Outstanding Reply with quote

This is my 3rd year using your method of cooking my standing Rib Roast for Christmas, and just felt compelled to say THANK YOU! Guests rave about the roast every year. Large family, usually doing 6-7 rib roast, and before I found your site, never wanted to risk that amount of $$ without knowing what I was doing.

My only suggestion is to add how to accommodate the heathens that actually want their meat cooked medium (god forbid, even medium-well). I have 2 ovens, so I let the roast get essentially done (~130), then slice off portions for those wanting it more done. I put the rest back at 150 (lowest my oven goes), and cook the others at ~375 for 15-20 minutes. Even with 2 ovens, this gets into a juggling act. Any other ideas?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1176
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2016 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I put the slice on a rack back into the oven at higher temps - 350-375 depending on what else is going on. at 1/2-3/4 inch thick it only takes perhaps 8-10 minutes - 'on a rack' is the key - allows heat from both sides....
thicker slices obviously longer.

the ends are typically a bit more done - so those sliced destined for mistreatment get sliced off the end(s) - but save the bark! for the real eaters,,,,
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Stuart
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 01, 2017 1:21 pm    Post subject: Not So Good Reply with quote

I researched this concept for days and figured the science was good. My 3 lb roast was not as good as I had hoped. This method does not render any fat that I needed for Yorkshire Pudding or juice for au jus. :-(.

Once I realized there was not going to be any fat I bumped the oven to 300 and did get enough for Yorkhire Pudding but that ended up overcooking the outer inch.

Maybe try one more time using 225 F to render some fat next year? Wife was not happy with me as I had done great roasts using the Martha Stewart method for the last 21 years and my one attempt to improve on that was less then perfect.

I guess maybe if you don't need fat for pudding then it would a good recipe.
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"The Best" Prime Rib Roast:

5 Ribs serves 8 - 11
7 Ribs serves 12 - 15

Purchase the roast with Bones but, “Boned and Tied”. The butcher will cut the bones away, then tie them back on. The result is maximum flavor from the bones and easy slicing at serving time.

Cooking method (from Chef Ron Lock - “Roast Prime Rib of Beef”) SIMPLE!
Seer roast at 500° (Yes, 500°) for 5 min.s per pound. Then, turn the oven OFF and let the roast slow cook to the removal temperature. Throughout this process, do not open the oven door – ever! Get an oven thermometer to make SURE you are at 500°.

Example:
Say a roast is 5.75 lbs. x 5 minutes = 28.75 minutes. I will round up to 29 minutes and add 1 minute for the heat lost when opening the oven door to load the roast.

Pre-prep: Insert cloves of garlic in the meat (about four cloves per rib, arrayed over the top of the roast). Also, liberally rub on fresh cracked pepper. I never freeze the roast but leave in the fridge uncovered, on a rack/drip pan (just a foil tent) 2 – 3 days so the outside will dry enough for a great brown crustiness when cooked. Remove from the fridge 8 hrs. before oven time so the roast gets up to room temp. For the cooking method to work, it MUST be at room temp when going into the oven.

Just before oven time mix plenty of Butter at room temperature (consistency of peanut butter) with a generous amount of “Herbs de Provence” (spice list below). Completely coat the roast (except the bones) with this mixture, just like you were spreading peanut butter on a slice of bread. This will impart a beautiful tasty crust on the roast and will hold the herbs in place for them to stick to and flavor the crust.

I also strongly recommend a good Probe type thermometer inserted ALL THE WAY into the center of the roast. All-the-way is important, so there is minimal exposed probe to heat up and give the tip a false high reading. A Roast Pan Top is not used. Again, make sure you do NOT open the oven door. I duct tape the door shut and put a sign on it (due to nosey relatives, Ha!). You will experience some "crackeling" and smoke as the butter makes the crust. Not to worry.

(Picture1)
Roast is covered in Butter/Herbs de Provence mixture and in the roasting pan ready to go

Remove Roast immediately at 120° F for perfect medium rare. Let roast rest on a cutting board (Bone side down) for 8 -10 min.s before slicing. This will allow juices to reabsorb into the meat for maximum flavor.

(Picture 2)
Resting Roast. Notice the beautiful herb crustiness on the outside holding all those delicious juices in.

(Picture 3)
I slice right on the cutting board where roast (Bone side down) is resting. Simply slice down to the bone so you are past the pre-cut that the butcher made. Have a BIG platter nearby and just cut the tie strings as you go.

Come and get it!

Option is a packet of Au jus prepared in a gravy boat for the ‘juice lovers”.

“Bone” appetite!

Herbs de Provence:

This makes enough for a 7 Rib Roast, so portions can be adjusted for the size you have.
2 Tablespoons of each:
Dried Savory
Dried Rosemary
Dried Thyme
Dried Oregano
Dried Basil
Dried Marjoram
Dried Fennel Seed
Combine in an airtight container for multiple uses or portion as required for smaller roasts.

Creamy Horseradish Sauce:
¼ to ½ cup fresh Horseradish, drained
1 to 2 cups Sour Cream
1 to 2 tablespoons Lemon juice
½ to 1 teaspoon Salt
Mix, adding Horseradish as desired.
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Fred
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:23 pm    Post subject: Well over 10 years, now. Reply with quote

Michael, I first read your process a number of years ago. For the past 10 years, I believe, every roast of varying weight has turned out perfectly.

About 5 years ago, I roasted 3 8-pound roasts at the same time, in the same oven. I used the same process as for a single roast, and each was perfect. Two were roasted to 125 degrees, and I left one roast to cook to a temperature of 135, for the faint of heart.

I remember consulting your website before I roasted the three, but don't believe I reported the results.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1654
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 6:07 am    Post subject: Re: Well over 10 years, now. Reply with quote

Fred wrote:
Michael, I first read your process a number of years ago. For the past 10 years, I believe, every roast of varying weight has turned out perfectly.

Thanks Fred! I'm happy the recipe holds up!
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