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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2006 7:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Pan choice Reply with quote

Larry wrote:
If you sear on top of the stove first, (I have a nice big cast iron skillet), then would you put the same cast iron skillet into the oven or switch to a nice shiny roasting pan? (If the latter, I would assume save the skillet, deglaze later and add to the other pan drippings for jus or gravy).

Also, if switching to a roasting pan, do you lightly oil the pan first or not?
Or do you brown on the stove in a roasting pan rather than cast iron?

I usually sear on a different pan than the one I roast on. You can definitely use the same pan, but remember to elevate the roast on a grill so the drippings can fall into the pan (away from the roast).

I do not bother to oil the pan that I am searing on. When you sear the roast, just let it sit for a minute or two on each side. When that side has seared, it will release from the pan easily.

This was one of the first articles I wrote for Cooking For Engineers. Upon rereading it, I think I'm going to have to rewrite parts of it and add more information (and definitely a lot more pictures).
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Ty
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2006 3:23 pm    Post subject: 2 standing ribs Reply with quote

Huh? silly a question as it may be...what is the cooking time @ 200F if I have two 6.25lb standing ribs in the roater???
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2006 6:47 am    Post subject: Re: 2 standing ribs Reply with quote

Ty wrote:
what is the cooking time @ 200F if I have two 6.25lb standing ribs in the roater???

I've only done two roasts at the same time once. That time, the roasts took the same amount of time as when I roast one - about 45 minutes per pound - so about 4-1/2 to 5 hours.

I'd appreciate others who have tried this to comment on their experience.
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linda
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 8:23 pm    Post subject: Best Site Reply with quote

I was very glad to find your site today while looking for a new Salmon receipe. I have been married to an engineer for 34 years and he has a million reasons why not to cook.

Your site has come to my rescue. It if perfect for the analytical mind.
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beartrapdave
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2006 9:30 pm    Post subject: Prime Rib Reply with quote

Awesome site, being an Engineer, I was immediately drawn in, trying the pan seared red pepper recipe tonight. My problem is however prime rib, cook it once a year, Xmas, and the last two years I have had 12 lb roast go beyond the desired temp. Cooking 20 mins a pound (200F)(boneless in both cases) it was flagrantly overcooked to well done! This year bought a new poke in thermometer (will buy one you can leave in) and thinking I was being extra cautious, bought a oven monitoring gauge (hangs on the oven rack) to make sure my oven temp was correct. A desparity of 25- 30 degrees! I see no mention of matching temp setting , new oven this year (dacor) - any experince with that? Do you think it was all about being boneless? - jokes expected...... Thanks
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Kman
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 03, 2006 5:34 pm    Post subject: Rotisserie Reply with quote

I've done prime rib on a rotisserie 4 times now and agree with the theory that it's done when it's done. This weekend is an annual poker tournament I attend and feel that it will be easier said than done. I use a Weber grill and turn off the middle and back burners for a slow 225 degree roast. The hardest part is keeping early poker turnouts from opening up and looking.

We are planning on posting a bouncer (6'2" hockey player/ civil engineer) nearby, but fear his legendary appetite might create a conflict.

I will post our results.
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JimGettman
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 7:44 pm    Post subject: Leftovers Reply with quote

This may seem a sacrilege to some, but our favorite part of our slow-cooked rib roasts is the sandwiches we make from the leftovers. We make two kinds -
HOT ROAST BEEF - Make a good gravy, get it bubbling hot, slice the meat thin, make a great slice of toast, use tongs to dunk the slices and load them onto the toast. The goal is to get them hot without further cooking.
ROAST BEEF DIP - Make a good au jus, get it bubbling hot, slice the meat thin, slice open a hearty sanwich roll, dunk it and then dress it as desired (we add nothing), use tongs to dunk the roast slices and load them onto the sandwich. As always, the goal is to get the sliced meat hot without further cooking.
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 02, 2006 1:42 pm    Post subject: Cooking for a contract designer Reply with quote

Contract designers would be cooking and eating a fillet.
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gue0



Joined: 19 Mar 2006
Posts: 9
Location: Springfield OR

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 8:21 am    Post subject: I thought you guys were engineers....m(-)m..... Reply with quote

Though I'm merely a lowly technician, I gravitate toward the scientific perspective on most of the answers needed to respond to the questions here. I wonder why some simple physics isn't appied here. The same science which is appied to baking pastries and custards is also appropiate to roasting, braising, broiling, broasting, frying, boiling, steaming, sauteeing, and anything else I might have forgotten. This would consist of the variables BTU output of the appliance, density, volume, and water content of the item being cooked. There are minor considerations such as the temperature coefficient of the medium conducting the heat and the rate of the heat transfer, but in order to hypothosize a universal formula for cooking a piece of meat to the desired state would require the careful collection of data under controlled conditions. Cooking is an art that is not immune from the laws of physics and physics underlie_ the principles of everything. Ya think?
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chiocciman
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 09, 2006 3:04 pm    Post subject: It will never be done Reply with quote

This roast will never be done. You Engineers will debate conversion and physics until the roast is well done and no one will eat it.

Time to take it out of the oven. (ha ha)

Chuck, Manufacturing guy.
ps: I really like the garlic idea. Niuce touch!
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2006 12:23 am    Post subject: Re: It will never be done Reply with quote

chiocciman wrote:
This roast will never be done. You Engineers will debate conversion and physics until the roast is well done and no one will eat it.

That's why I recommend the use of a probe thermometer. That way, I can set it and forget it as I argue / discuss with my friends about the merits of using low heat vs. high heat roasting and start a pool going with the various estimates of when it will be done. If we get carried away, the BEEP BEEP BEEP from the Polder will tell me to come back to reality and pull the roast out of the oven. Smile
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Brian Peterson
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 7:02 pm    Post subject: 20-25 minutes per pound in a convection oven Reply with quote

NAFortis wrote:
...James Beard offers a <preheated 180 to 200 degree oven> slow-roast method for standing rib, BUT he specifies "...roast without basting for approximately 23 to 24 minutes per pound, until it achieves an internal temperature of 120 to 125 degrees for rare meat; ..."
Your method specifies a far longer time per pound. How say you to Beard's time/pound?

Michael Chu wrote:

My estimate of 45 minutes per pound comes from how long it takes my 200F oven to bring an eight pound roast to an internal temperature of 130F. I took the totla time and divided by eight pounds. This has held true for the last two roasts that I prepared. (Usually, I tell my guests to show up at a certain time and that dinner will be done when it's done. I start preparing the final touches of the other dishes when the roast is sitting at 125F - the last few degrees always seem to take forever.)


My convection oven at 200F took 4 hours to roast a 9.5 pound rib roast from 37F to 130F, as measured by both a thermocouple (accurate to +/- 0.1F) and a remote sensor digital oven thermometer (Pyrex professional brand +/- 1F). Another thermocouple with a 'gas' (open grid) sensor confirms that the thermostat on the convection oven is accurate.

So, I have to go with James Beard (and the New Joy of Cooking) for these times, at least in my convection oven.

Delicious! Thanks for the article and the comments!
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tiernosc
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 9:32 pm    Post subject: Prime Rib Reply with quote

Smile That was the best prime rib I have ever cooked. The recipe is simple and delicious. Thank for the great meal. Also, I would agree that the thermometer made the difference, although the 45 minutes per hour was right on.
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 12:59 pm    Post subject: Sirloin tip Reply with quote

Quote:
This end is referred to as the small end rib roast or loin rib roast or sirloin tip roast.


The sirloin tip roast (AKA round tip roast, AKA beef knuckle) is cut from the front of the leg, the area from the hip to the knee. It is not associated with the rib.
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Tom Cahill
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 1:34 am    Post subject: Roasting other cut's Reply with quote

Very Good recipie for any cut, try it with "Chuck" or any other cut that has good "Marbeling" works the same, shorter cooking times. Be sure to increase the "Done" temp with smaller pieces. as they don't retain as much heat. Never over 138 before removing it if you like rare.
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