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Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast
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inOne
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 2:48 am    Post subject: Excellent recipe! Reply with quote

I tried cooking two 5lbs slabs at 200F but with convection. It was a tad more well-done than I like after 4 hours. I tested after 4 hours since I estimated it will arrive at 130F in about 5 hours. My timing was off because of the convection factor. Next time I'll probe after 3 hours.

It's a good idea to have the butcher debone and tie back the bones. In that slit I insert pepper corns and garlic slices. This adds a really nice flavor to the meat. Thank you.
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Tod C
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 1:12 am    Post subject: Prime Rib temp Plot Reply with quote

Here is data on internal temp of an eight pound rib roast (four bone, loin end). The first column is minutes and the second is the internal temp. I removed it at 128 deg F and provided a perfect Medium Rare roast. I pulled it out for 20 minutes as indicated below to use the oven for something else. Total time in the oven was 250 minutes. Tod C

Min Temp
0 37
35 48 pulled out
78 68 back in
115 84
140 93
165 100
195 109
225 120
255 125
270 128[/img]
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Old Mike
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 11, 2010 8:52 pm    Post subject: That Time of Year Again Reply with quote

Well it is time to fire up the oven,I have an electronic probe this year we will see how it works,as opposed to my dial thermometer which was calibrated every 5 F. I still like the >3/8" browned outside, so will cook at max oven temp for 20 or so minutes then take roast out while the oven door is open and cooling down to around 200.
Old Mike
Old Chemist
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2010 3:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael,

I love you.

Thank you for your site. It is the most useful site on the Internet, hands down.
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Mining Engineer
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 8:33 am    Post subject: No rub - No sear - A high altitude data point Reply with quote

1. I read on another website a recommendation to not use salt, pepper or anything else on the outer surface, so I tried it. The meat tasted fine. I added a little salt to taste as I ate it.

2. I also decided to see what happens with no searing in pan or oven. I thought it tasted fine. Don't be afraid to try it with no rub or sear. I have had "crusty" prime rib that was good, but the unadulterated prime rib flavor and texture is a nice change.

3. I took my 9 lb. roast out of the fridge 45 minutes before it went in the oven. That amount of time was not anywhere near enough to let it warm up, but it didn't matter. Temp was 38 F when it went in.

4. Cooking time here at approximately 5300' above sea level was 5 hours 35 minutes to 130 F. Out to rest for 30 minutes, it picked up 5 degrees of carry-over to end at 135 F. Medium rare edge to edge. I will probably give it maybe 2 more degrees next time, just a little firmer and a lighter pink would be nice.

5. I had to set my oven at 210 to get the temperature to average 200, and it was more stable when I set it to 215 which averaged 205. A good oven thermometer in addition to the probe thermometer is essential. If I had believed my 200-degree oven setting, I would have actually been cooking it at 190. Then I read some articles about how inaccurate oven thermostats are, especially at lower temperatures. Will probably try a little higher temp, maybe a measured average of 235.

Overall, the slow, low temp roast is the way to go, thanks Michael. My only disappointment was that the meat wasn't as warm on the plate and in my mouth as I am accustomed to at a good restaurant. Must be those heat lamps and such. Does anyone have a suggestion as to how to have the serving temp higher without turning it into medium or well done shoe leather?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 10:44 pm    Post subject: Re: No rub - No sear - A high altitude data point Reply with quote

Mining Engineer wrote:
My only disappointment was that the meat wasn't as warm on the plate and in my mouth as I am accustomed to at a good restaurant. Must be those heat lamps and such. Does anyone have a suggestion as to how to have the serving temp higher without turning it into medium or well done shoe leather?

Warm your plates in the oven prior to service. That will keep the prime rib warmer longer as you eat it. Make sure the plate is hot but not over 130F-140F or else it could continue to cook the meat. 160F might even be okay, but really hot plates (some restaurants serve on > 300F!) will just cook your meat at the table and that's not what we want when you've spent so much time and effort preparing the roast.
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Jack Kirscher
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:33 am    Post subject: Boneless Rib Eye Roast Reply with quote

I am planning on having rib-eye roast for Xmas dinner. I bought two boneless roasts; one is 8 lbs. while the second is 7 lbs. This year, I am planning to use the low temp (200 degrees) method in a convection oven. This causes me to have to ask several questions. Each roast is about 10 inches long; eight inches wide; and probably averages about 3.5 inches thick. Should each be tied to form a log or left as is? Since both will be roasted at the same time in the same oven, and not touching each other, do you treat them as though they were one roast for calculating length of time to roast. Unless I hear otherwise, I will roast about 4.5 hrs at 200 degrees. In summary: should I tie or not? Is 4.5 hours about correct for 130 degrees internal before resting?

Thanks for any response.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

you can probably get away without tying them - but they will be easier to handle and likely 'prettier' if you do. if there is a fair amount of fat between the muscle groups tying would keep them from falling apart.

time sounds about right - check after 2 hrs then every 30 min or so - adjust temp as needed.
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Kirscher
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Dilbert. I shall take your recommendations.
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FoodScienceGuy
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 7:27 pm    Post subject: enzymes Reply with quote

One point that hasn't been mentioned yet is the effect of low temperature cooking on enzymatic activity. Aging meat, either wet or dry, allows enzymes to act at low temperatures, further tenderizing the meat. However, enzmes have different optimum temperature ranges. By bringing up the internal meat temperature slowly it allows for all the enzmes to work at their optimum temperature range. Once the internal temperature of the meat reaches 40 C (104 F), most of the enzymes will denature. So the higher temperatures you cook the meat, the less time the enzymes will be working in their optimum range.

I use both dry-aging and low temperature cooking to achieve maximum tenderness and flavor. I also suggest dry-aging for at least a week (keeping in mind the meat you get from the grocery store has already been wet aged for about a week). And yes, I dry-age in my refrigerator although it is an extra one with no other food items in it (except of course for microbrews and canned Cougar Gold cheese).
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mf15



Joined: 22 Dec 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 8:53 pm    Post subject: Oven Temp Control Reply with quote

I decided to check my oven temp this year, wow if I set it to 200 F then it runs up over 250,then won't go on until well below 200 F. Temp control is not good and it has electronic control. So I suggest everyone get an oven thermometer so you can see what is actually going on. Then of course you should check the oven thermometer to see if it is anywhere near accurate.

Old Mike


Last edited by mf15 on Wed Dec 22, 2010 8:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
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mf15



Joined: 22 Dec 2009
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jack: I did two roasts last year, my comment is that you have to treat them as two different roasts.they will achieve temperature at different rates.
Old Mike
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deanna
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 1:32 am    Post subject: pre-cooked prime rib Reply with quote

I purchased a pre-cooked prime rib back in July that I'm planning on making for XMas dinner. It came vacume sealed frozen in a plastic bag. The supplier said to take it out of the bag, put it in a pan covered with foil at 350 and start with 10-15 minutes. However, I'm afraid 350 will cook it further so I think I'm going to try the pouch method listed here. I plan to bring it to room temperature then submerge in hot water and leave it in the pouch it's already in. I have two questions. When I take it out of the water bath, do I need to also let it rest for a while? Secondly, for what we don't eat, can I reheat slices with the same method or with the lettuce method or can I not reheat it again? Any advice would be welcome.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

deanna -

cooking in the pouch in a warm-to-hot water bath is aka "sous vide"

more detail on the method here:
http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/283/An-Introduction-to-Sous-Vide-Cooking

it's not quite clear from your post if the whole roast is frozen or if it has been sliced and slices individually pouched - sounds like the whole roast is in one bag. hopefully it's well on it's way to thawed at this point in time.

personally I'd be tempted to thaw & then allow the whole roast to come to room temp - then in the oven at 250'F to re-heat - check the internal temp with thermometer after 30 minutes or so.

reheating it - by any method - such that the internal temp goes over the 130'F (rare - 135F medium rare) will indeed "cook" it further. the sous vide method uses water temp as essentially the "final desired temp" and is less likely to overcook the roast but see the thread because maintaining the water temp without some gadgets / special gear is tricky. be aware - sous vide is _not_ a fast cooking method - it will take some time to slowly reheat the entire roast. might want to consider slicing it first then seal in a bag.

left overs I slice and re-heat in a fry/saute pan with liberal juice - yes they do go a bit browner than rare....

"the lettuce method" hmmm, looks like the spell checker got the best of that one - no sure I follow the lettuce (g)
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DeAnna
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 6:04 pm    Post subject: pre-cooked prime rib Reply with quote

Yes the whole roast has been pre-cooked and frozen and yes it's de-thawing now. Some people suggested for reheating slices to place romaine lettuce over the slices and reheat in the oven. I'm less concerned with the time it takes as long as I don't overcook the thing. The supplier said he left it in the bag and put the whole thing in the microwave one time for 7 minutes but I'm not sure I want to try that. Possibly if I just bring it to room temperature and slice it and pour hot jus over it it would work just as well. Thanks
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