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Oven Roasting Smoke Problem

 
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AManetti



Joined: 09 Dec 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2005 7:57 pm    Post subject: Oven Roasting Smoke Problem Reply with quote

When oven-roasting a chicken, is there a way to prevent the drippings from smoking up the house?

I have a recipe that requires cooking the bird at 500 degrees for over twenty minutes. Although the result looks and tastes great, obnoxious fumes from the drippings that hit the bottom of the roasting tray ruin an otherwise delicious meal.

The problem, of course, is to prevent the melting chicken fat from touching the hot surface. I've thought of using aluminum foil but, other than making cleanup easier, I can't see what good that would do.
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McDee



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 25

PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2005 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roasting over a bed of thick-cut mirepoix does wonders for preserving and flavoring your juices for later use in a gravy and should resolve your smoking issue.
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rexmo
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 11:34 pm    Post subject: 3/8" thick onion slices lining the bottom Reply with quote

would serve the purpose of the mirepoix noted above, be a little simpler to assemble. I usually line the pan I bake a brisket in with such to prevent scorching. The onions caramelized in the dripping fat are usually better than the brisket itself.
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kgb1001001



Joined: 21 Dec 2005
Posts: 107

PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2005 2:30 am    Post subject: Add water or broth to the roasting pan Reply with quote

I picked this up from the Cooks Illustrated book on Chicken (and just did this when roasting a chicken today). If you add 1/2 cup of water (or an equal amount of chicken broth) to the roasting pan it will keep the drippings from burning. You may need to add more as the roasting progresses, depending upon how big your chicken is. If you add broth, then you get the added benefit that you've just performed a double reduction on the broth and it makes a richer pan sauce or gravy
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ktexp2



Joined: 03 Nov 2005
Posts: 34

PostPosted: Sat Jan 07, 2006 2:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Make sure your oven is fairly clean as well - obvious, I know, but a good thing to remember.

My roommate regularly gets drippings all over the inside of the oven whenever she cooks (drives me insane!!!) and I usually don't notice until I go to cook something at 450 or higher. It gets all smoky in there, and starts to set the kitchen smoke alarm off. Very irritating. I cleaned it to an immaculate state and almost immediately after she made ham and got ham juice all over the door.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 352
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 05, 2006 9:27 pm    Post subject: Re: Add water or broth to the roasting pan Reply with quote

kgb1001001 wrote:
I picked this up from the Cooks Illustrated book on Chicken (and just did this when roasting a chicken today). If you add 1/2 cup of water (or an equal amount of chicken broth) to the roasting pan it will keep the drippings from burning. You may need to add more as the roasting progresses, depending upon how big your chicken is. If you add broth, then you get the added benefit that you've just performed a double reduction on the broth and it makes a richer pan sauce or gravy


I find that when I add water or veggies under my chicken or pork or beef roast, it makes the oven humid and I don't get my crispy golden skin. My chickens go in at 450 for one hour and I've never had any problem with smoking up the house. I run probably 30+ meals through my kitchen a week, so it isn't due to volume.
I can tell you this, the inside of my oven has a patina like a cast iron skillet. While I don't usually go above 450, it'll do 450 for more than a few hours without any wafts.
Ya know, I may not be getting the volume of smoke because my oven vent goes in to my exhaust hood. Even so, it's got about 12" between the exhaust and intake and I don't see 'huge' amounts.
As far as messy roomates, you could line the bottom of the oven with foil, that might help. Just don't cover up any vents you might have if it's a gas oven.

Biggles
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