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New kitchen suggestions (Part II)

 
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Johneegeek



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 21
Location: Kenosha, WI

PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 3:08 pm    Post subject: New kitchen suggestions (Part II) Reply with quote

Continuing my discussion on building my new kitchen from the old forum....

Now I'm looking at kitchen counter tops.... We were thinking of getting a solid surface like Corrian. The info we are getting about this now is that you shouldn't pour boiling water in the sink or it will crack!? That seems kind of silly. Why would I want a sink that I can't pour boiling water in? Do I have to wait for my pasta to cool off before I drain it into the sink???

Has anyone else heard this or had experience with these types of counter surfaces?
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mole6e23
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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 11:48 pm    Post subject: Corrian and boiling water Reply with quote

I love the Corrian countertop, and it is just fine with boiling water. All you want to do is run cold water at full bore down the sink while you pour the boiling water, perhaps slightly slower than you would in a stainless sink, but I never had a problem when I did that.

The only thing you have to watch out for is carrots. They are the only thing I have found that can consistently stain corrian, and they are very difficult to get out. Everything else comes out very easily usually just by wiping, but sometimes with a little use of a green scotch pad.

A salesman also told me that you'd have problems if you spilled nail polish remover on it. I soaked a test piece in acetone (the main ingredient in nail polish remover) for three months and noticed no ill effects. YMMV.

While you're getting the counter top, ask for a few larger sample pieces (8" x 12" or so) to use as cutting boards (even better, get them to match any trim color you get). They aren't great on your knives, but for cutting up raw meat and poultry they are great since they are completely sealed and non-porous.
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Johneegeek



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 21
Location: Kenosha, WI

PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2005 11:57 am    Post subject: Re: Corrian and boiling water Reply with quote

mole6e23 wrote:
All you want to do is run cold water at full bore down the sink while you pour the boiling water, perhaps slightly slower than you would in a stainless sink, but I never had a problem when I did that.

What I might do is get an undermounted stainless sink, but they are much more expensive than the corian sinks. :?

mole6e23 wrote:
The only thing you have to watch out for is carrots. They are the only thing I have found that can consistently stain corrian, and they are very difficult to get out. Everything else comes out very easily usually just by wiping, but sometimes with a little use of a green scotch pad.

Thanks for that tip... None of the salespeople mentioned carrots will stain.
I'll just have to be carefull with carrots. (Again, the stainless sink might be a better option)

mole6e23 wrote:

While you're getting the counter top, ask for a few larger sample pieces (8" x 12" or so) to use as cutting boards (even better, get them to match any trim color you get). They aren't great on your knives, but for cutting up raw meat and poultry they are great since they are completely sealed and non-porous.

Hmmm, as long as I don't use any good knives....I'd think that would wreck them pretty quick. The salesperson said that they'd give the "cutouts" from the sink and the cooktop as cutting boards, and my first reaction was: "You want me to use my knives on that?" -- However, maybe for just preparing meat and poultry that would be okay...
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2005 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe you can use the extra corian for those slide out boards that your wife wants to use to hold stuff with.

Hmmm... but corian doesn't withstand heat too well - maybe that was a bad suggestion.
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Niko
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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2005 8:14 am    Post subject: Due diligence - look at all types of countertop materials Reply with quote

Take a look at other types of materials just to get an idea of the pros and cons. When I redid my kitchen three years ago, I ended up choosing Richlite (a paper product) over Corian -- specifically because I read Corian could crack with heat. Richlite ended up being a good choice for us since 1) we wanted to install it ourselves (it was available by the sheet back then); 2) it has high heat- and moisture resistance; 3) scratches and nicks can be buffed out. Also, I didn't mind the lack of choices in color, since I wanted black. There is another company called Paperstone that now makes a similar product for DIYs. Stainless steel, concrete or stone, and tile (probably the lowest cost, excepting Formica) are also good choices.

Whatever material you choose, get a nice, deep undermounted or integral sink. You won't believe how you ever lived without it once you've had one installed. Good luck with your kitchen!
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Amadio



Joined: 11 Dec 2005
Posts: 10
Location: Seattle, WA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I asked my kitchen planning associates about slide out cutting boards and they couldn't even come up with a competitor who would put them in.

The alternative was having a drawer with a set of side rails which would hold the cutting board at the top of the drawer. Wish I could be more help.

As for the counter top, two things you might consider are that aesteticly granite has higher resale appreciation and Concrete counter tops are cost effective and becoming more vogue. At least that's the case in my market.
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sarae
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:11 pm    Post subject: Countertop material Reply with quote

We have granite, with very deep stainless undermounted sinks.

We looove the granite because it is beautiful and is impervious to heat and scratching.

Its pretty nice to take a pan out from under the broiler and just plop it right down on the island, without having to worry about a trivet or anything.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Thu Mar 09, 2006 3:04 am    Post subject: countertops and sinks Reply with quote

Corian is fine for the bathroom, but I would stick with granite or Silestone (sp?) for the kitchen. A BIG DEEP stainless undermnount sink is a must. The undermount is important because you can just wipe crumbs off the counter into the sink without a lip to catch debris,
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 11, 2006 11:46 pm    Post subject: Re: New kitchen suggestions (Part II) Reply with quote

Johneegeek wrote:
Continuing my discussion on building my new kitchen from the old forum....

Now I'm looking at kitchen counter tops.... We were thinking of getting a solid surface like Corrian. The info we are getting about this now is that you shouldn't pour boiling water in the sink or it will crack!? That seems kind of silly. Why would I want a sink that I can't pour boiling water in? Do I have to wait for my pasta to cool off before I drain it into the sink???

Has anyone else heard this or had experience with these types of counter surfaces?
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2006 2:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have heard the exact same thing about not pouting boiling water into a Corian sink. That is why I stated in the past, I think Corian is fine for the bathroom counter and sink, but not the kitchen.
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leilaames



Joined: 02 May 2014
Posts: 2
Location: 1166 Bryan Avenue Stillwater, MN 55082

PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2014 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have never heard of sink cracking after boiling water is poured onto it, but have heard that most of the stone counter tops of the low quality can not stand the hotness and may get damaged. Thus I have installed quartz counters in my kitchen to add beauty to my kitchen.
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 315
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turmeric stains like the devil, but if you use a mixture of isopropyl alcohol 50/50 with H2O and a small bit of detergent, it turns purple/blue and cleans right up.

Perhaps the same would work for carrot stains?
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tehach



Joined: 14 Feb 2014
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Aug 02, 2014 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quartz is a great countertop material. I've installed them on two houses and am pleased with the results.
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