Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Adding Polyethylene Glycol to sorbet as anitfreeze?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
rowrowmama



Joined: 15 Jul 2012
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 9:53 pm    Post subject: Adding Polyethylene Glycol to sorbet as anitfreeze? Reply with quote

I was looking at a sorbet recipe that recommends adding a bit of vodka to keep it scoopable after it's been in the freezer for a while. I can't do alcohol since my tween and non-drinking husband will be eating it. But as I was looking around I noticed references to Polyethylene Glycol being an antifreeze, and realized that's the active ingredient in MiraLAX, which is now sold over the counter.

My tween's pediatrician has had her taking MiraLAX daily for months now. The Dr. swears it's quite safe, even for long term use, becuase it doesn't have any stimulants that would create dependencies, and it's very gentle, no side effects.

It seems like I could add a small amount of MiraLAX to the sorbet to help keep it scoopable. And a small amount added to a whole batch seems like a person wouldn't even get a clinical dose, which is 17g. But how much do you think I'd have to add to get the antifreeze effect? 1 tsp? 1 tbsp?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 339
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you need a better doctor for your "TWEEN".

Who's paying for that advice and prescription? The kid needs to eat better, with more fiber. That's all.

As a mother and "engineer", you ought to know that.

You could probably acheive stabilzation of both your kid's bowels and your sorbet by adding a gum, such as Sat Isabgol/ aka psyllium husk.

Jim
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rowrowmama



Joined: 15 Jul 2012
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whoa, don't think an attack is called for. My daughter has had this problem since infancy, not a time when a lot of fiber could be consumed. When she was 1 she frequently chose cauliflower over oreos and oranges over brownies, and still eats a bunch of vegetables and whole grains every day. No "wonder" bread in our house, and very little fast food. So I'll stick to the advice of a doctor who actually knows what her diet is.

Now if you or anyone else has specific information about harmful side effects of MiraLAX, I'd be happy to evaluate that information.

I was hoping someone knowledgeable about chemistry could comment on the the antifreeze properties of Polyethylene Glycol.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 339
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, I was rather harsh and I apologize. Sort of an interesting question, too. I suspect you'd need quite a bit volume-wise to appreciably affect the freezing point -- maybe there are other ways to "soften" the borbet?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1631
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What are the ingredients in the sorbet recipe? Using more sugar or invert sugar will depress the freezing temperature of the sorbet but it will also make it sweeter. Alternatively (and this option isn't available to everyone), you can set your freezer temperature so ice cream and sorbet are more scoopable. I keep one of my freezers at around 5F for that purpose.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

this is a starting point for "maximums"

http://www.codexalimentarius.net/gsfaonline/additives/details.html?id=270
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Thoth



Joined: 19 Dec 2012
Posts: 6
Location: NJ

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PEG is perfectly safe. It works via the same mechanism fiber laxative would work but actually, you wont suffer from the side effects you may get from fiber (i.e. gas and bloating because of the gut flora fermenting it) because PEG is biologically inert.

That said, not sure how much PEG would be needed, you'd have to determine it empirically because its a complex solution. A potential downside (besides the obvious laxative effect) is that it will adversely effect mouth feel. Because high molecular weight PEG solutions will have a slippery/slimy feel to them. Though I know guar gum often used to to stabilize sorbets/ice creams and inhibit ice crystal formation is used at 0.5% of total weight of recipe. So maybe use that as your starting point for PEG. Or you could just use guar gum (Bob's Red Mill brand is usually easily found)

Though going with Michael Chu's suggestion, in theory you could use isomalt for your sugar, it has 50% the sweetness of sucrose. So you can use twice as much and get the concomitant freezing point depression with the same overall sweetness. Oddly I can find isomalt in the Korean market in my neck of the woods.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 339
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I can find isomalt in the Korean market in my neck of the woods.


Really!??? What's it called?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Thoth



Joined: 19 Dec 2012
Posts: 6
Location: NJ

PostPosted: Fri Dec 21, 2012 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Cooley wrote:
Quote:
I can find isomalt in the Korean market in my neck of the woods.


Really!??? What's it called?


The only English on the bottle says Isomalt Syrup, I can't read Hangul so its very possible there is something lost in translation. I'll see if I can get a picture of the bottle.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
counter



Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 44

PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2013 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the real sorbet you have to add a little bit alcohol, or you'll obtain just a lemon ice cream...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group