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Take a Leek... and do what with it?

 
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 361
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 9:58 pm    Post subject: Take a Leek... and do what with it? Reply with quote

So I bought 2 lbs. of leeks and cleaned then and sliced fine in the Cuisinart.
I steamed them for a couple minutes in the pressure cooker.

I took the result and pureed it.

Now I have a fine mess. What have I gotten myself into?




Anny suggestions for turning this into a meal?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1050
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

split pea soup with hot dogs and a goodly dollop of the leeks.
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 361
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's disgusting!

I suppose you'll want me to make smiles with a pastry tube of mustard? Little eyes made from pimentoes?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1050
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2012 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>disgusting
the split pea soup?

I've never pureed a batch of leeks - a fine dice for potato leek soup - but I also add bias sliced recognizable chunks of leek.

actually, pretty much any cream soup that isn't lily white could use the flavor boost from the leek puree - presuming you like the onion notes.
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 361
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2012 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, you're right of course. I'll just add some diced potatoes, throw in some cumin and fry some fish (marinated in masala) to throw on top.

I had picture of one of Lilek's creations from the 60's whereby you'd lay out a weiner shaped like an octopus, add a smile made of mustard and a couple specks of pimento for eyes...

Pity it has to be vegetarian, or I think some bacon would add to the taste.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1050
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2012 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

>>vegetarian

here's a killer leek & cauliflower dish:

http://www.redbookmag.com/recipefinder/cauliflower-leek-parmesan-gratin-recipe

don't make the full qty - that was my first try oopsie . . .

edited to add: link broken - here's the recipe
Cauliflower & Leek Gratin

1 (2.5 lb / 1.1 kg ) cauliflower, cut into 1" (2-3 cm) florets
6 tablespoons unsalted butter (85 g)
3 medium leeks (white and light green parts), halved lengthwise, rinsed, and thinly sliced crosswise (3 cups / 700 ml)
1.5 cups / 350 ml heavy cream
1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
0.5 cup / 120 ml grated Parmesan cheese
0.5 cup / 120 ml fresh breadcrumbs, mixed with Parmesan cheese

bring some salted water to a boil and blanche the cauliflower about 4 minutes; rinse to stop cooking and drain.

preheat oven to 400'F/205'C

butter a 2.5 qt/l casserole

in a large skillet, melt butter, add leeks, cook on low about 10 minutes, covered. stir occasionally; leeks should get soft.

remove pan from heat, add cauliflower, toss to mix, transfer to casserole dish.

combine cream, nutmeg, salt, and pepper - pour over mixture, top with crumbled Parmesan / brad crumb mix.

bake about 35 minutes; top should brown and sauce should bubble.


Last edited by Dilbert on Thu Apr 09, 2015 7:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 361
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2012 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Caulifower and Parmesan is a nice combination. I'll try that. Thanks!
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rubystarr



Joined: 30 Nov 2012
Posts: 1
Location: London

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This would be good to freeze in small batches, and use for stews and stocks Smile
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Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 361
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Cooley wrote:
Caulifower and Parmesan is a nice combination. I'll try that. Thanks!


Hey Dilbert,

Made that quite a few times since your suggestion. It IS a good combination!
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