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Test Recipes: The Classic Tiramisu (original recipe?)
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2009 10:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Granulated sugar Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
Why ordinary sugar-sand would not suffice? It is going to be dissolved anyway... Unsure

What's sugar-sand? Granulated sugar is the "normal" sugar you find for sale at the market here in the U.S.
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MaterialisticEngineer
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2009 1:45 pm    Post subject: Finger biscuits Reply with quote

A friend of mine told me that Italian finger biscuits are different from american ones. She said that they were harder. Is this true? American ones are spongy and sweet, which are great for making trifles and I love them.
I just wanted to be more Italian so I will take the lead from any Italians out there.
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daneck
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:28 pm    Post subject: tiramisu Reply with quote

An ex's mother used to make me tiramisu regularily. The family is from Italy and immegrated to Montreal Canada.

While I no doubt could have learned to make the tiramisu...I didn't bother (yes I was an idiot! Tiramisu is my favourite dessert)...she did tell me the cookies HAD to come from Italy.

They would be brought to Canada only when relatives visited as they could not buy them in Canada.
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RimJagle
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 2:56 pm    Post subject: Espresso and LadyFingers Reply with quote

Regarding the extremely strong coffee taste the author reports, I'd guess this is due to the fact that American espresso (in my opinion) tends to come from over-roasted beans and is unbelievably bitter and strong. European espresso (in my opinion, and I am an American living in Europe) is of course strong, but rarely as bitter as American espresso. I made this recipe last night usign the recommended amount of (European) espresso and it turned out perfect. The balance of flavors was right on: not too much coffee flavor, not too much liquor flavor. It was divine!

Regarding an earlier post about lay fingers being soft in the States, in Europe they are hard and quite dry. This works great for soaking up the cofee - they soak it all up so you don't get a soup but they also retain their shape and give the tiramisu some form when lifted from the pan.

I would rate this recipe as the best Tiramisu recipe I've come across, and I've tried plenty! Thanks for posting it!
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2009 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just wanted to say that I LOVE that you use nice, clear, and detailed photos to accompany your recipes. Thank you very much and I look forward to giving this a try.
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Hi
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 8:44 am    Post subject: another recipe for tiramisu Reply with quote

There is a recipe for tiramisu, and it is a bit different from this one, if interested, please go there to have a look, the website is http://lonlu.com/food/cook/136-teach-you-cook-romantic-tiramisu-step-by-step.html
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Guest






PostPosted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 6:05 pm    Post subject: Tira mi su Reply with quote

The suggestion that Tira mi su is only ten or so years old is nonsense. My Grandmother lived in northern Italy and I remember her making Tira mi su for us over 40 years ago using her own recipe. One of the differences was that she didnt use cream and used Marsala and Brandy as well as espresso cafe, I have her recipe and its divine!
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Howard



Joined: 21 Nov 2005
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2009 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know what I did wrong but my cream mix turned out extremely runny. I substituted for the Marsala wine 1/8 cup of Kahlua, 1/8 cup of Bailey's and subbed the rest with water to make up the 1/2 cup. The other change was using a stick blender to smooth the mascarpone cheese. Would that have made it so loose? Will it fix itself in the fridge?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1635
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 4:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Howard wrote:
I don't know what I did wrong but my cream mix turned out extremely runny. I substituted for the Marsala wine 1/8 cup of Kahlua, 1/8 cup of Bailey's and subbed the rest with water to make up the 1/2 cup. The other change was using a stick blender to smooth the mascarpone cheese. Would that have made it so loose? Will it fix itself in the fridge?

The cream is supposed to be whipped up into a foam - not to be used in the recipe as a liquid. Substituting with water will not work.
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Irish Lady
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:56 pm    Post subject: original tiramisu recipe Reply with quote

the first time I made a tiramisu the recipe used 3 eggs separated and about 5 fl oz milk to made the 'custard'. I had no idea what marsala was but used a little bit of port wine instead. I made a strong coffee/rum mixture using a rich roast instant coffee. it is a good idea to divide the coffee mixture in two as I dipped the lady fingers too long. ended up having to make more for the second layer. I am also sure the egg white were whipped and added to the beaten cheese and 'custard'. it was really good and got better over a few days. it was a very large dessert and was one of many over the xmas holidays. the family loved it and always request it for special occasions. I cannot find the first recipe I used but have tried others and all have been just as good
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Rebecca
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I noticed that he used ladyfinger cookies but I offer the idea of making them from scratch. You can buy them in a grocery store bakery section. The recipe is in the link below.

http://www.joyofbaking.com/Ladyfingers.html

Also, the first recipe I ever made included a little rum and melted chocolate in the coffee mixture. I will definitely consider lemon zest in the mascarpone mixture next time I make it. Lemon zest in cream cheese is incredible so why not here, too. YUM! This is such a fun site!
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Diana
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 23, 2009 7:49 pm    Post subject: Twist on Cocoa Reply with quote

Just thought I would share my twist on the cocoa. Instead of cocoa I use Cocoa Nibs that I have ground in my spice grinder (coffee blade grinder). Cocoa Nibs are roasted cocoa beans, they have a wonderful nutty crunch and definate chocolate flavor. I sometimes add a dash of cinnamon and give a final spin in the grinder to mix.

The beauty of this, above and beyond the flavor and that it is still traditional in that it really is cocoa powder of sorts, is that it's texture is wonderful and it doesn't get soggy. I still add some fresh though, because of brightness.
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smiley
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 2009 3:53 am    Post subject: Can I use Mascarpone and Philledelphia cheese? Reply with quote

I loved this recipe as it was very easy to follow.Thank you! But I was just wondering if one can use Philledelphia Cream cheese with the Mascarpone or just Philly on its own when one doesnt have the mascarpone on hand?
thanks again.
I will be having my 2nd attempt of Tiramisu tonight since the first one went so well. The recipe I used was half Mascarpone, half whipped thickened cream....now I'm waiting for the answer in regards to the Philly cheese from some clever 'engineer' or Tiramisu wise person....please?

thanks
smiley
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ANON
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:52 am    Post subject: marsala substitution Reply with quote

if i didnt have any marsala on hand could i substitue it with baileys?

also, if i wanted a non-alcoholic tiramisu what is a suitable substitution for the marsala?

thanks in advance
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Justpassingby
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:10 pm    Post subject: Tiramisu Reply with quote

Hi everyone,just giving one more cent here,

my ex is a cook from Molise,and I guess it depends of the area of Italy if they use Marsala or not,same with the whipped cream.I remember he did use Marsala for Tiramisu,but no cream,just Mascarpone,he did add a little Amaretto in the espresso though,anyway,will make it tomorrow. Wink
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