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Recipe File: Basic Biscuits
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Guest






PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, the British use of the word biscuit is very meaningful, as it comes from the Latin panis biscotus, or "bread twice cooked,"

You yanks call them cookies.

To make them crisp the practice was to lightly cook them (not brown) let them cool and the next day cook them again to brown them up. This practise produces by far the best biscuits (Cookies), once tried its hard to go back to the single cooking method.

You Yanks removed sugar from scones and call them biscuits, very curious indeed. I have cooked for Americans and have learnt to appreciate Southern soul food, It was a steep learning curve. but boiled intestines was the pits LOL

But you lot really know how to put on a BBQ.
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Guest






PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A biscuits a biscuit the world around. A good biscuit depends a lot on the patience and attitude of the cook. Yes attitude. Sometimes we get what we expect.
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guest
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2005 12:55 pm    Post subject: using a griddle Reply with quote

I read about cooking biscuits on a griddle from the "Joy of Cooking" and have found it to be a wonderful way to cook biscuits. Warm your griddle to a medium heat, then let the biscuits cook for 5-7 mins on each side, until golden brown. They pop up so nice this way!
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biscuiteater
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2006 10:35 am    Post subject: biscuit v scone Reply with quote

Scones are much more dense and dry than biscuits. They almost always contain current or a similar fruit, although variations do abound. I must say that I find the texture rather disagreeable.

Hot, fluffy, southern-style, buttermilk biscuits on the other hand...drizzled with honey and served with fried chicken, split, with butter, slathered with preserves, hiding underneath my sausage gravy...however you serve them, are a heavenly little poof of home. Yum!

The one discrepancy I keep finding among recipes (often referred to as 'receipts' in the old south) is how far apart the biscuits should be placed prior to baking. Just touching, a few inches apart, an inch apart...

...I guess I'll just have to keep on baking them until I get it right. Darn. Wink
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north carolina
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2006 11:14 pm    Post subject: biscuits Reply with quote

southern biscuits are made with lard,to be true southern. thank you
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:36 pm    Post subject: Biscuits Reply with quote

this recipe is great. I made a batch which turned out perfectly. My mom was so impressed that she ate most of them. Guess i'll have to make more. I did find though that my biscuits only took about 10 min to cook not 15.
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jim
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 1:48 pm    Post subject: pot pie? Reply with quote

How come the chicken pot pie recipe isn't in the recipe file?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:51 pm    Post subject: Re: pot pie? Reply with quote

jim wrote:
How come the chicken pot pie recipe isn't in the recipe file?

It is... but unfortunately, the way I've coded the website, it lists recipes in alphabetic order by the title that I've gave the original article - which in this case is Traditional Chicken Pot Pit. I want to change how this works, but I'm not sure what the best method of listing recipe names is...
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! I had no idea that we could be so touchy about what to call biscuits, cookies, scones, etc.! Laughing Out Loud I don't think any one person makes any of the before mentioned exactly like anyone else, the key is to find what works for you. Also, it helps not to get your hopes up when biting into someone else's recipe or confection. Teasing It might not be exactly the way you were hoping for it to be. (If not you can always smother it in butter and pancake syrup----mmmmmmmmmmmmm.)
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Guest





PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2006 8:51 pm    Post subject: Biscuit Thread Reply with quote

<quote>Could margarine be used as a substitute for the butter? My friend is stubbornly health conscious and I know she'll know I put butter in these. <quote>

I'm curious as to why your friend would prefer margarine to butter for health reasons?

Emily
Everything Kitchens
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wanjean2@sbcglobal.net
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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2006 6:53 pm    Post subject: busquiit delimma Reply with quote

What insures a "fluffy" about 3 inch high bisquit
is it the cold butter, the bisquit cutter? or what, (novice) does the butter milk make a difference in the raise Shock Shock i wanted large and high and used a hollow tuna can but for some reason not flakey enough
i want a fluffy, light,high, soft brown on top. busquit any suggestions. Unsure
cant get grandmas recipe right Wanda
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Allyne
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PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2006 2:31 am    Post subject: Dense scones? Reply with quote

Bad scones are dense! Good ones are much more biscuit-like in texture.
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Guest






PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say, as an Aussie, that what you call biscuits is a kind of mini damper. Scones do NOT 'almost always' have fruit in them, perhaps if you are American but not traditionally. Traditionally, scones are an afternoon tea thing and you would never serve them with anything like meat. Damper you might, though. If your scones are dry you need to change your recipe, I wouldn't eat them. Damper is fairly versatile and I would say that is what your 'biscuits' are. But if you expect these to be flat, sweet and tasty you'd be surprised!
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moonknee
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2006 3:15 am    Post subject: cold butter shortcut Reply with quote

A good way to get the butter the right size without it warming up too much is to stick it in the freezer first, then grate it (using the large holes on a box grater) into the dry ingredients.
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Missipi Mike
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2006 4:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One cool trick I've learned to make the biscuits easier to open... Just make two thin layers of dough and stack them together to make the recomended 1/4 inch. Taking the extra time in the beginning to make the top and bottom seperate will make them easy to load up later with butter and such.
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