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Recipe File: Thanksgiving Dinner
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Cooking For Engineers



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 16776766

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 9:37 pm    Post subject: Recipe File: Thanksgiving Dinner Reply with quote


Article Digest:
Every November, millions of Americans get together for Thanksgiving Holiday. On the evening of the fourth Thursday of November, days of culinary preparation come to a climax in the traditional Thanksgiving dinner. Need some ideas for what to serve at your Thanksgiving? Let Cooking For Engineers provide some recipe suggestions.

Start your feast with a salad made of hand torn romaine lettuce and a homemade vinaigrette dressing. A turkey noodle soup made from homemade turkey stock, diced carrots, egg noodles, and seasoned with salt & pepper is a great way to start everyone's appetite.

For your main course, serve a turkey prepared in your favorite manner or use one of our recipes: Classic Roast Turkey or Smoked Beer Can Turkey

While the turkey is resting, finish up a Giblet Pan Gravy. In addition to the gravy, Thanksgiving turkeys love to be accompanied with some Cranberry Sauce.

For side dishes, Garlic Mashed Potatoes or Garlic Roasted Red Potatoes are both winners. In addition, Campbell's Green Bean Casserole is such a regular guest to the dinner that recently a television commercial was made presenting the awkward situation of all the guests brining a Green Bean Casserole to the feast. (But, I think it's better to have too much green bean casserole than too little.) A bit of sweet corn bread might also welcome.

Finally, bring out pumpkin pie(s) for dessert.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2005 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

out of curiousity, why is this article dated on 11/24/2005, when it's still only 11/5/2005?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 3:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I post-dated the article so it way stay ontop while I post new articles in the next couple weeks. I'm planning on releasing a chef's knife review and a recipe for dirty rice before Thanksgiving (if all goes well).
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pimp5life
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 3:39 pm    Post subject: thanks Reply with quote

im getting bored with the traditional thanksgiving dinner
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Yasminah
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2005 4:04 pm    Post subject: Boring! Reply with quote

How about something not so traditional? There is nothing worse than green bean casserole. In the south, we serve rice and sweet potato casserole (NOT with marshmallows -- yech!), and of course cornbread. Of course, as one professor friend observed at Thanksgiving, its the only time when all Americans are likely doing the same thing -- eating the same meal at about the same time, etc. We have varying traditions for other national holidays, but Thanksgiving is our only truly consensual tradition.
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Carol
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think this should say bringing the Green Bean Casserole, not brining the Green Bean Casserole.
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jpeck
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 3:51 pm    Post subject: thanksgiving dinner Reply with quote

Sweet Potatoes are a must, as are "Greens", preferably collards and kale mixed and cooked forever in smoked ham hocks! (don't forget the vinegar).
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Syd
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: TURDUCKEN Reply with quote

Michael, I've read this article in a magazine about this strange dish called Turducken.

It's a deboned turkey stuffed with a deboned
duck stuffed with a deboned chicken stuffed
with corn bread and pork stuffings.

It was invented in Maurice, Louisiana. No recipe
was mentioned but it sounds nice.
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SUNGODDESS444
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 11:19 pm    Post subject: THANKSGIVING DINNER Reply with quote

I MYSELF WOULDN'T WANT TO HAVE TURKEY SOUP AS AN APPETIZER. IN FACT, WITH AS MUCH FOOD THAT WILL BE SERVED FOR THE MAIN MEAL, THE SOUP WOULD FILL ME UP. THUS, LIMITING ME ON TASTING EACH AND EVERY ONE OF THE SIDE DISHES (WHICH DOESN'T INCLUDE GREEN BEAN CASSEROLE) AND OF COURSE THE TURKEY.
Cool
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phinky
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 1:19 am    Post subject: Soup for Thanksgiving Reply with quote

I would recommend a pumpkin curry soup. And then an apple pie for dessert. If you want to try something different.
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Yasminah
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 3:29 pm    Post subject: Turducken Reply with quote

A lot of grocery stores carry this in the frozen foods section. It costs around $65. Its a very old concept -- this was common in the middle ages. Personally, I would not take on trying to make one, but maybe one day I would buy one, just to try it.
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Marsha
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: Blackened Turkey (also Turducken) Reply with quote

My main question is whether anyone has experimented with Morton's Blackened Turkey (you'd know it if you had--it's a long, complicated recipe involving "painting" the elaborately stuffed turkey with an egg paste several times during baking to achieve a crust that blackens; I can provide the recipe on request). I like the recipe, but cannot seem to achieve the predicted break-off-able crust that I am supposed to get, which breaks off to reveal crisp and delicious skin. Any hints on temperature control or other physics-type stuff that could help me with this?

As for turducken, it takes longer than a regular turkey, but is very good (depending on who makes it) and quite expensive (around $200 in California for a large one, which comes frozen). The ones I have cooked have a rice stuffing somehow tucked in and around the bird(s), and the fun part is carving as you would slice bread, getting concentric layers of different meats.
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Kaydub
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2005 9:19 pm    Post subject: Preventing the crack in the middle of the pumpkin pie... Reply with quote

What causes the crack in the middle of a pumpkin pie? How do you prevent it?

Thanks for the tips.
Kaydub
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:23 am    Post subject: Re: Preventing the crack in the middle of the pumpkin pie... Reply with quote

Kaydub wrote:
What causes the crack in the middle of a pumpkin pie? How do you prevent it?

The most common cause of cracks in pumpkin pies is overcooking. If you bake the pie until the center has completely set, chances are during cooling, it will develop a crack. The trick is to bake it until the center just jiggles (like Jell-O) when you twist the pie gently. It should fully set while it cools off.

If it does develop a crack, cover it with fresh whipped cream (whipped with sugar and a few drops of vanilla extract; or use almond extract for a nice twist).
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Aileen



Joined: 13 May 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Tustin, CA

PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2005 5:57 am    Post subject: another side dish for Thanksgiving Reply with quote

My mother-in-law makes a Chinese sticky rice (no mai fon) to accompany her turkey at Thanksgiving. It has bacon, Chinese sausage, onion, green onion, celery, shiitake mushrooms and oyster sauce. I made it for our church Thanksgiving potluck today, and went home with an empty dish! Good thing I doubled the recipe so we have some in the fridge at home. Smile

I made Eric's Chocolate Pecan Pie as one of my desserts last year, and liked it so much that I may repeat it for this year!
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