Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Recipe File: Shrimp Scampi
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Connie
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Re: tails left on

My understanding is that cooking with the shells on make the shrimp more flavourful. I had a similar dish last night at a Southern Italian restaurant and they had the entire shell on. I would have preferred to have the shell off with slightly less flavour; I was up to my wrists in sauce trying to wrestle the shells off them suckers. Next time I will ask them to peel them in advance!
Back to top
supergood
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Totally agree with the above about the shells, which is probably why the shells from shelled tails often get used in the stock for soups - perhaps a starter before the linguine above?
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Calling a recipe "Shrimp Scampi" is like calling it "Shrimp Shrimp" since (as Michael even points out) "scampi" is an Italian word for shrimp; contrary to popular opinion and thousands of bad American restaurant menus, "scampi" does not imply any particular method of preparation.

Saying the dish is "traditionally served over linguine" is silly because there is no traditional dish named "shrimp scampi". And although I agree that linguine goes well with shrimp and garlic, it is a perfect complement (that's with an E), not "compliment" (with an I).

Nice looking Website but I hate it when amateurs pretend to know cooking and publishing.
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1620
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, I'm not the one who named the dish. This is what it's called in the United States - I just wanted to share how I cook the equivalent dish.

If there's too much confusion over the title of the dish, I'll change it, but I was under the impression that calling this dish "Shrimp Scampi" would immediately bring forth images of shrimp in butter garlic sauce. Let me know if I am mistaken and what the title of this dish is supposed to be called. (And yes, I did think it was odd for a dish to be called shrimp shrimp, but there are plenty of food names that don't make sense...)

Michael
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not an engineer but I thought this website with its recipe formats/presentation was interesting but people you are killing me with your stupid commentary in the reviews!
What I want to know when I read a recipe review is how does it taste? would you make it again? what might you change or what did you do differently from the stated recipe? How would you rate this on a scale of 1-5 with 5 being the best?
Check out other cooking sites(www.allrecipe.com, www.epicurious.com) to see what a thoughtful recipe review looks like.
I think this site has great potential but reviews like what's posted for this recipe will turn a lot of people away.
Back to top
supergood
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well there's no reason to be rude is there? Why don't you ask Michael if he approves of comments like this or not. And while you're at it you could ask if his hits have gone down or not because of these comments.

Sheesh.
Back to top
liz
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh bosh. This is a great site. I didn't take it to be meant as some commercial, "professional" venture, but someone's earnest personal food sharing! (With nifty original format for recipes!) I hate slick commercial stuff anyway.
Back to top
liz
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

(PS: I meant "bosh" to Anonymous Coward's comment about the site.)
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

oooooohhhh, I am only anonymous, because am incredibly lazy in all other areas but cookery. While I work with many P.eng.'s what I appreciate is the asethetic of the prep., I was drawn to the mechanics and machinations. I agree, it would be nice to say, "oh, that was lovery", or "what a symphony of choices", but, that is not this site. The beauty of this site, is like classic art. Because of the intellect of the interpeter, we know more than when we originally began. Love the work. Would never cook avocados... But would by wooden cutting boards, good knives and good salt because of you. Good work, keep it up....
Back to top
jm
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For this Midwesterner, shrimps/garlic/butter/pasta is *exactly* what Shrimp Scampi means.
However I had a friend in college whose father was Italian and we once went out to a place in Little Italy in the Bronx where one of the items on the menu was Shrimp Scampi.
Friend's father was perplexed and asked the waiter, what's this? I think for him scampi was a shrimp-related creature but of a different size, so a dish named Shrimp Scampi was crazy, stupid or meaningless. The unctuous waiter patronizingly explained to him that it was an Italian dish, blah, blah, the father insisted it was nonsense, he'd lived many years in Italy and had never heard of the stuff, and the waiter muttered under his breath as he turned to go, "Va Fa Napoli!" which for some reason means "Go to hell!"
Back to top
Eric Chin
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for having such a great site up. Makes cooking look interesting again for me.

I especially like how you present the recipe in chart form, makes the sequence look so much simpler.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

any one herr
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the UK, scampi is a prawn / shrimp - type creature, deep fried in breadcrumbs (or perhaps batter) and often served with chips! (referred to as "scampi and chips") So, completely different from the "shrimp scampi" mentioned here (all versions). Typical British food - take anything, deep-fry it and serve it with chips! (chips = fat French Fries). Tastes good, though!
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Re the question about leaving a portion of the shell at the tail: The process of removing the "vein" cannot remove the terminal portion as it dives deep through the body of the shrimp and ends at what is the equivalent of the anus. Yes, Michael is correct that the "vein" is not a vascular structure but is in fact the alimentary canal or gut. All of the shell can be removed, and you can eat the entire shrimp, tail and all, but when you do you will be eating the terminal portion of the gut and the anus. This may or may not offend you.

As to shrimp versus prawn, the distinction is not important in any scientific sense. There are some 300 species of shrimp, but most common is the species Penaeus. As a matter of usage, the term prawn is often applied to larger specimens but does not mean that it is a different critter. Perhaps the term serves best as a justification for higher prices on menus.

Two comments were made about the role of the left-on shell at the tail in improving the flavor of the dish. Whether there is a large contribution to the flavor from this small portion of shell is arguable, but it certainly is possible to deepen the intensity of flavor by making the dish with the addition of a quarter cup or so of quick shrimp stock added to the mixture. Take removed shrimp shells, any lemon rinds, and any parsley stems, put them in a small saucepan, mash them down, add 3/4 cup of water, some salt and (white) pepper, bring it to a boil, reduce it by about half, and add that to the mixture. Do this especially if you like your dish a bit broth-y.

Buy big shrimp if you want to show off, but they get very tough very easily. Use smaller shrimp for better flavor and more tenderness. It means more work shelling, but the result is finer.

Cooked lemon juice loses its edge very quickly. If you use lemon juice in your recipe, and you should, add it at the very last minute, after you have added all the rest to the pasta in the pot. Bright lemon flavor is key to this dish.

Whether you use any Parmesan cheese is a matter of taste. If you use Parmesan, use the good stuff, Parmigiano-Reggiano. Grate it with a microplane grater or a fine wood rasp reserved for kitchen use only. The first time around, add the cheese as a sprinkle on a portion of your plate and see if you like it.

I'm anonymous only because I did not want to set up a blogger account. I am neither an engineer nor a chef, but I cook a lot of shrimp, and these are thoughts from my own personal quest for the ultimate Linguine con Scampi al Limone.

rhpmd@sbcglobal.net
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

when i poured the shrimp on the pasta it wasn't as salty...why was that so.
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Page 2 of 6

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You can delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group