Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

High smoke point oil

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Enrico



Joined: 24 Jun 2011
Posts: 3
Location: Portland - Seattle

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 4:41 pm    Post subject: High smoke point oil Reply with quote

I am looking for a high smoke point oil. Just using EVOO is not working the way I want. May be I am not giving food enough time in the pan, but I am interesting in trying something else, because there may be a better way and I am curious.

So, I found this half gallon of canola oil from Costco in the cupboard. My wife buys things and puts them there.

Now I read that there is a big difference between "refined" an "unrefined" oils.

What the heck does that mean???

If it is that important, shouldn't it be indicated on the canola container????

The container does not mention anything about "refinement". Check out this link.

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/50/Smoke-Points-of-Various-Fats

Someone give me an idea of what to cook with please.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1024
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

safflower has a neutral taste and is one of the high smoke point oils.

Olive pomace oil is not recommended - it often conveys an off taste.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Cooley



Joined: 09 Oct 2008
Posts: 346
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Refined vs. unrefined: Good question! Hope Michael can clear it up.

I always thought peanut oil had the highest smoke point, so now I'll try safflower oil.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1024
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

here's a link that gives a general description:
http://missvickie.com/howto/spices/oils.html#Refined%20Cooking%20Oils
http://www.madehow.com/Volume-1/Cooking-Oil.html

the fine print on the label may - gandering the shelves about 50% - explicitly state 'made from refined . . ' etc.

the 'exact' process of 'refining' I sure varies by the oil source -

I wonder if there is a practical difference in the home kitchen between a (for example) 420'F smoke point and a 450'F smoke point. the higher temp oils are preferred for commercial operations where the oil may be held at high temperature for extended periods - the theory is under those circumstances is it more stable and less likely to go off flavor. for a once&done saute it may not make an real difference.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
yocona



Joined: 18 Mar 2011
Posts: 47

PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2011 12:56 am    Post subject: Re: High smoke point oil Reply with quote

Enrico wrote:


If it is that important, shouldn't it be indicated on the canola container????

The container does not mention anything about "refinement".

If the oil were unrefined, it would definitely be specified on the label.

Peanut oil is my preference for frying.

One thing to remember about any oil: each time you heat it, the smoke point is lowered for each subsequent re-use.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
natdelvboy



Joined: 25 Aug 2011
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a handy reference I use: oil smoke points
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hanzpiao



Joined: 19 Sep 2011
Posts: 1
Location: Tokyo

PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try using HiLo oil. It's commonly used in chinese restaurants due to the smoking hot woks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
counter



Joined: 07 Feb 2013
Posts: 44

PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2013 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Usually I use sunflower oilseed, I Think it's the best for frying.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Cooking Tips All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group