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Recipe File: Turkey or Chicken Stock
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Carlos
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 4:21 am    Post subject: cooling down stock Reply with quote

Thank you for your prompt and informative reply. I greatly appreciate the logic at work in your writing & explanations of cooking.

When I made the chicken stock yesterday (for the first time in my life) I made just 1/2 gallon approximately (perhaps less). So when I placed the pot in the sink with the cold water it cooled down almost immediately. I think that is why, at the time, I did not think much of the heat...I realize now that anything more than a quart or two would be some serious heat for the fridge to handle.

Thanks again for your help
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Guest
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 11:57 pm    Post subject: chicken stock vs chicken broth Reply with quote

I feel like I did the right thing in learning how to make this stock. Now I can extend my repertoire of recipes little by little.

Is the chicken broth used in the "Recipe File: Shrimp Scampi" the same liquid that is made in this "Chicken Stock" recipe? From the photo, it appears to be. Not sure though. In general, when a recipe calls for chicken broth, can stock be used instead without adverse affects??

Thanks again for your gracious help.

Carlos
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 7:45 am    Post subject: Re: chicken stock vs chicken broth Reply with quote

Guest wrote:
Is the chicken broth used in the "Recipe File: Shrimp Scampi" the same liquid that is made in this "Chicken Stock" recipe? From the photo, it appears to be. Not sure though. In general, when a recipe calls for chicken broth, can stock be used instead without adverse affects??

I don't recall any chicken broth being used in the shrimp scampi recipe... maybe you're referencing a different article. In general, you can use homemade chicken stock whenever a recipe calls for chicken broth. Since I do not salt my chicken stock prior to storing it in the freezer, when I add the stock, I also need to add salt appropriate for the dish. I prefer it this way because sometimes the canned broth is too salty for a particular application and you can't take out salt, but you can always add it. Also, the homemade stock is much more flavorful than the canned broth.
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Carlos
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 5:35 pm    Post subject: chicken stock vs broth Reply with quote

Hi Michael, I noticed the chicken broth in the Orzo Risotto with Buttery Shrimp...no chicken stock in the Shrimp Scampi...my mistake.

Thanks once again for a great forum & site!
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chopper
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2006 6:26 pm    Post subject: all right Reply with quote

made stock a few days ago. mostly from a number of leftover parts and bones, as i buy chickens whole and cut them up as i need them.

roasted some of the bones before putting them in, and some of the pieces are a little meaty as well, so that gave it a little bit of broth flavor. yeah, a little less gelatin, but i reduce the stock quite a bit which makes up for it, plus i use a lot of bones.

veggies are usually scraps from other meals, which is actually nice because it gives a bunch of different flavors to the stock.

also, at the same time (why not), i rendered all the skin and fatty scum from the simmer in another pot to make schmaltz. can't go wrong with flavored fats.

the only problem is my stove has trouble with a simmer setting, either it's too low and it barely bubbles or you turn the knob ever so slightly higher and it starts boiling.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Nov 03, 2006 7:39 pm    Post subject: Re: all right Reply with quote

chopper wrote:
the only problem is my stove has trouble with a simmer setting, either it's too low and it barely bubbles or you turn the knob ever so slightly higher and it starts boiling.

Barely bubbles is fine. That's probably running around 180°F (if you're at sea level) which is just where you want to be.
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guest
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 3:21 pm    Post subject: stock Reply with quote

How long is Turkery stock good in freezer. It wbs put in right bfter it wbs cool. I hbve hebrd 1 yebr bnd also 3 months or 6 months
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 5:13 pm    Post subject: Re: stock Reply with quote

guest wrote:
How long is Turkery stock good in freezer. It wbs put in right bfter it wbs cool. I hbve hebrd 1 yebr bnd also 3 months or 6 months

If it hasn't been repeated thawed and refrozen, one year is a reasonable amount of time to assume chicken stock will still taste good if frozen.
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SweetAfton
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can this be made by using a crockpot?
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kyano
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 5:26 am    Post subject: Crock pot stock Reply with quote

I do that all the time. I find that it is a wonderful carefree way to make unmatchable stock. I buy whole chickens and cut them up for meals and save the "bits and pieces" in a ziplock bag in the freezer and when I have most of a gallon-sized bag full, I throw them into the crock pot and cover it with water, turn it up to high and walk away. It can literally simmer all day and not need a thing done with it. Sometimes I add just a little cider vinegar, as my grandma said that helps to leech out the calcium from the bones, but that may well be an old wive's tale...

I like using the crock pot for stock over using a pot on the stove because I am always having to monitor the heat, and replenish evaporated liquid when I am making stock on the stove. With the crock pot, I don't have to pay any attention to it at all.

Anyway, I cool the stock down and stick in the fridge overnight and then skim off all the fat and pick the meat from the bones, throw in whatever veges are in the fridge/freezer, season, add some noodles, and I have fabulous chicken noodle soup with virtually no effort.
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blair
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PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2007 4:23 pm    Post subject: Can you destroy/denature gelatin by overcooking? Reply with quote

Hi,
Thanks for this great website! I read on the net that you can overcook broth with either too high heat or cooking too long. I understand the collagen can break down. Is this true? Do you have guidelines for max heat/max time?
Thanks for your help,
-Blair
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1622
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 6:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Can you destroy/denature gelatin by overcooking? Reply with quote

blair wrote:
Thanks for this great website! I read on the net that you can overcook broth with either too high heat or cooking too long. I understand the collagen can break down. Is this true? Do you have guidelines for max heat/max time?

As far as I know you can't over cook broth. It is true that collagen will change (into gelatin) with heat, but you're actually trying to promote this process when making stock. A rolling boil can cloud the stock by agitating and breaking up little bits of the meat or vegetables you're making stock with, but after the vegetables have been removed, I often boil it down to a concentrated state (perhaps halving the volume) over high heat. The stock retains its flavors and gelatin content isn't changed enough that I can tell.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2007 2:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This works well in a pressure cooker and only takes 30 minutes. I wouldn't recommend buying a pressure cooker just to make stock, but if you have one its worth a try.

*word of warning do not attempt to make any stock while pregnant or you may never be able to eat homemade chicken soup again the smell is quite powerful.
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 11:10 pm    Post subject: Downside Reply with quote

There is a downside to using the colander insert while making your stock - it lowers the chicken/water ratio (which you want as high as possible) due to the 'dead space' between the insert and the walls of the pot.
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DarkShadow
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2007 6:49 pm    Post subject: making stock Reply with quote

Was just wondering if breaking the larger bones to let the marrow escape would be good?
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