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Recipe File: Creme Brulee (Crème Brûlée)
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 5:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cool indeed, i'm doing a project on it
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An ice water bath will work wonders for chilling creme brulee in a hurry - you can make a batch from start to finish in under three hours using a water bath to chill the cooked custards.

Freezing is also an accecptable method to chill the custards. It also has the added benefit that when you're done brulee-ing the sugar the custard should still be nice and cold.
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Guest






PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vanilla beans can be purchased for surprisingly cheap prices on eBay, in bulk.
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guest
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 6:53 pm    Post subject: Creme Brulee Reply with quote

You can find a creme brulee iron/salamander several places on the net. It gives the surface a bit more of an uneven look, more blackened caramel in spots and more crunch in others. This is the traditional look and feel for creme brulee and is a desireable effect. Plus, it gives you a greater intimacy with the dish you are preparing than flaming it with a blow torch or using the broiler.
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2005 4:43 am    Post subject: chocolate?!? Reply with quote

as a chocoholic, the next logical step in my mind is to add chocolate to this already heavenly dessert

my dad recently tried a chocolate creme brulee mix, but was not satisfied

any ideas on how to make a chocolate creme brulee from scratch?

thanks!
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Carmine
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2005 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can make the crust another way, too. My sister could never get the broiler method to work and she had a torch leak then flare back at her (she wasn't burned, but she was scared) so she made circles of sugar on tin foil, caramelized them in the oven and then just put them on the creme brulee. She said it worked well (I wasn't present, but she's fussy, so I imagine it worked nicely).
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Alexuma
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 2:10 pm    Post subject: HELP! I can't figure out how to fill my torch with butane! Reply with quote

I bought one of those expensive torches and cannot fr the life of me figure out how to fill it...any suggestions?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1629
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2005 5:46 pm    Post subject: Re: HELP! I can't figure out how to fill my torch with buta Reply with quote

Alexuma wrote:
I bought one of those expensive torches and cannot fr the life of me figure out how to fill it...any suggestions?

Usually there is a port at the base of the torch that lets you fill it from a larger canister you can pick up at the supermarket (the butane canisters used for cooking on a portable stove). Generally, you take the nozzle of the butane cannister and insert it into the port on the base of the torch and pres to release butane into the mini-torch. However, I suggest you find the instructions that came with your torch or find someone who has the same model of torch and read their instructions.
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eyespy3017
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can I use 1 big round baking dish to make 1 big creme brulee?? It is shallow, about an inch.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1629
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2005 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

eyespy3017 wrote:
Can I use 1 big round baking dish to make 1 big creme brulee?? It is shallow, about an inch.

Yes, you should have no problem with that. The cooking time may have to be adjusted, but it will probably still work if you don't make any adjustments at all.
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Becks from New Zealand
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:59 am    Post subject: Its not hard and like jelly like creame caramel Reply with quote

Hey Everyone.

I made cream caramel once and it was hard and more like a jelly (different from American jelly) it was wobley. Anyhow I have tasted creame burle a couple of times but was wondering if the way that resturant cooked it was like a secret recipe as I dont understand how they made it so creamy. Is it the cream in the brulee that is so different than just milk in a cream caramel??? I know its a real dumb question but I dont want to waste my time if the recipe is just going to be hard again.
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seraphicNEU
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2005 9:03 pm    Post subject: torch it! Reply with quote

the making your own careml and using the broiler on the stove did not work for me. I have not tried using the salamander but I believe the best way to go is to use the torch.
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J
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2005 6:07 am    Post subject: Flavoring ideas Reply with quote

We make Creme Brulee where I work but flavor it in different ways. The most recent batch was made using vanilla beans in the cooking (the insides were scraped out and added together). After the creme was finished cooking but before baking, we added blue flower Earl Grey tea to the mixture. We then let it sit in a cool place for the rest of the day. The next day, we strained it through a fine strainer (we call it a chinois) and baked it. The creme has a light tan color when prepared in this way. Just before serving we torch it, then put cherries and whipped cream on one side and serve it immediately. It's marvelous.

It was mentioned that vanilla extract leaves an alcohol taste. I've only used the beans when making the creme, but there is vanilla extract available that is in glycerin instead. It may not be in standard grocery stores, but I think health food stores often stock it. May be simpler than tracking down vanilla beans.
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 5:26 pm    Post subject: Help finding a strainer. Reply with quote

Any idea where I can purchase a sieve or "chinois" that is fine enough for this application. More specifically, a distributor and model would be great. There are various styles and sizes available online but it's impossible to tell if the mesh is fine enough for this job. Thanks!
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Guest






PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2005 11:52 pm    Post subject: Creme Brulee, Chinois, Vanilla Extract Reply with quote

If you cannot find vanilla beans, add & blend the vanilla extract just before pouring it into the ramekins.

Williams Sonoma on line is a good place to buy everything one would need, including a chinois.

My recipe calls for a tsp of orange zest and vanilla bean to simmer with the cream for 15 minutes. The bits of peel are strained out by the chinois leaving a smooth, creamy texture.
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