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flat cut brisket for london broil?

 
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pbonefirst
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 10:22 pm    Post subject: flat cut brisket for london broil? Reply with quote

Flank steak is pretty tough stuff, but cut across the grain/muscle strands, it makes for a very delicious, flavorsome london broil. What about the flat cut of a brisket? Could one cook and/carve that in such a way as to be able to grill it, hot and fast, and have it in rare slices? Thanks for any thoughts!
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pbonefirst
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:35 pm    Post subject: maybe a marinade Reply with quote

If I wanted to use flat cut brisket for london broil, would some sort of dry rub or a marinade help to flavor it or tenderize it?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
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Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

various cuts can be used for London Broil - so why not give it a try?

I would go with a wet marinade - something acid to help break down the meat and flavorings to your preferences -
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2010 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Dilbert! I'm going to try a ginger, soy, sesame salad dressung marinade for a day or so...
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IDontUse
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't see the point of cooking meats like these in dry methods, when there are so many other cuts that would be perfect. Brisket can be braised or stewed, but the thought of grilling makes me cringe.
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
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Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2010 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was tempted to try grilling brisket because it is beef, and the cut is the right shape and thickness to cook evenly when exposed to high heat for short periods. It is not, in other words, thicker at one end or side than the other, which would insure uneven doneness. But I tried this, and the first wise saw that comes to mind is the one about a sow's ear and a silk purse. I did wet marinate for 36 hours, but the grilled "steak" came out as tough as shoe leather, no matter that I carved it against the muscle grain. It simply has too little fat content. My conclusion: don't be tempted to try to turn a brisket into a steak. It will remain a sow's ear, er... just as tough as one. Slow, wet cooking is the only way to go with this baby! Thanks for your support, Dilbert. Now I know, and I hope this post will inform others tempted to experiment in the same way.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[tough as nails]

ouch. otoh, the brisket is one of those traditional 35 day bbq cook things . . [g]

I've also had good grades go tough on the grill - at least until I picked up on the "finger poke for doneness" trick. it has to come off before it gets to the hard firm stage.
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
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Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 1:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, yes, of course! Brisket can be "grilled" but preferably low and slow, not like the sirloin steak flash treatment I gave it on a ridged, cast iron grill on the stove!)))) I can imagine it being a super winner if barbecued correctly and smokily, with a great sauce...
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