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Cooking Tests: Bacon (Part I)
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Ron
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been using one of those special microwave trays that the second poster linked to. It works OK, but it is hard to time it right to get crisp bacon. I used to use the paper towel method but it gets frustrating because my wife buys whatever brand is on sale and some brands of paper towel and bacon stick together like crazy.

So now I am back to the pan fry method of my pre-microwave days. This was taking me 15 minutes, too, in a cast iron skillet, but I figured out if you are only doing three or four strips, use a 9 inch teflon pan. Yes, it is too small for the bacon when you start out. You have to scrunch it in there a little. But, soon, the bacon shrinks to fit, out comes the fat and now you are "deep" fat frying. I can do four strips in about six to eight minutes. You did not mention to drain the bacon on paper towels to crisp it (it only takes 30 seconds longer), but I think this is key also. I like this bacon better than any microwave. And the teflon pan is easier to clean than the microwave tray.
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R J Keefe_repost
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For weekend breakfasts, I melt bacon. Using an AllClad double-burner griddle, I cook eight to ten strips of bacon over very low heat - 1 on a scale of 9 - for 90 to 120 minutes. The strips cook nearly flat, and turn a mahogany color unique to this process.
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Ryan P
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As to keeping the bacon flat.
My Dad alway used what he called a "bacon press", he made it out of a peice of stainless steal about 4"x8" and welded a handle to it. While the range was heating he would let the press sit on the range also, heating with it. Then when he placed the bacon on the range he would put the press on top of it, the bacon couldnt roll up because of the weight of the press.
tada, flat bacon :-)
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the kitchen science!

I found a recipe this weekend for Amish peppered bacon.. it sounds bizarre, but also fabulous.. dip the bacon in egg, then coat it in a light coat of peppered flour, THEN fry. Doesn't end up with a thick coating, but is crisp and strange and different!

My arteries don't feel quite strong enough to try it yet...anybody feeling invincible? Let us know how it tastes!!
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tomato
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roasting (baking) it keeps it flat. This is really the best way to go because when you pan fry it the ends cur l up and dont cook through (yuck). I always buy thick cut bacon that's not commercial, so it doesn't have much sugar. I roast it at 425 degrees for 15-17 minutes, depending on the thickness of the bacon. If you're using bacon with lots of sugar, it might burn at 425.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe it was a comedian that said this although I do like the slow cook pan fry method. Most people like to rush it. The quote was something like "The only way to cook good bacon is in the nude". The idea being that if you cooked it at a low enough tempurature it wouldn't splatter and the fact that you were nude would ensure you didn't get impatient and raise the heat. All said and done, microwave works great and is quick. Also, if you bake your bacon (350 unitl sone on a cookie sheet) which I did for years in restaurants and then let cool and put in a freezer bag you can cook a months worth in one setting. Heat in the microwave for 20-30 seconds and its good enough for family table. you might want to just under cook it because when you reheat it will cook some more. It's not crispy
this way but fuctional
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My two cents on this subject.
Clean brown paper bags can be used instead of paper towels.
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you add clean up time, the microwave wins hands down. Toss the paper towels and you're DONE.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like my bacon backed. It seens not to shrink as much. I would like if it you would put it to the test.

Duane
LDA007@hotmail.com
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cook it on low heat and it will not burn, cur l or have a weird texture. My mama taught me how....you have to be Southern to cook bacon right!
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stefoodie
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'm another "bakin' bacon" fan. i've tried it all ways like you did and baking is now my favorite method -- it's slower, but unless i leave my oven for too long i always get perfect results.
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MCJ
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yum, bacon. Smile Try microwaving at 33% power for 3x the duration. I think microwave energy behaves much more like a conventional heat source when "derated" this way. I'd be interested in seeing how much more fat slow microwave-ing renders (if any.)
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Jim
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My favorite it grilling bacon. Especially if you're using a thicker cut. I prefer maple smoked country cut. Unfortunately, it is almost too cumbersome to start a real fire just for bacon, but a medium heat gas grill works fine . . . just keep an eye on the flame ups.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cook my bacon in a contact grill, similr to the George Forman EXCEPT I have temperature control and flat OR ridged plates. I use the flat & usually turn the bacon once because its so thin it doesn't contact both sides. I set the temperature anywhere between 350 & 400. Slight variations in the temperature make a big difference. The bacon comes out crispy but not crunchy. The fat & meat are equally edible (I hate overcooked meat)

I LOVE contact grilling my bacon & it's so much less messy & so much easier.
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My wife, a reformed vegetarian, figured out the best way to cook bacon at home. Lay it out in a big frying pan and put an upside-down plate on top of it. Drain the grease off once or twice while cooking. Takes 15 or 20 minutes. The advantage of this method is that the bacon cooks a little faster but it doesn't get burnt and it tastes excellent.
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