Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Cooking Tests: Bacon (Part I)
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
crzyryan
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmmm i love bacon. I have tried only frying and micowaving it though. A good possible way would be also to grill it over a flame from either charcoal or propane. when i have the chance i would try it with coal as it always has better flavor than propane. But u gotta get the coal thats real smoky not the fabricated ones. If anyone gets a chance to try this i would like to know the results. Interesting article
Back to top
Linda W.
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm definitely a fan of broiling - but with a rack so the grease drips off and lets it get nice and crispy.

yum.
Back to top
K
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When pan frying bacon, my bacon always became really crumbly and came apart like it was made of sand. I finally figured out that you have to clean out the grease before every new batch. Makes yummy bacon!
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, so I'm not American and I suspect this is a cultural difference in naming; but what is "broiling"?

For the record, Bacon should only ever be fried, best in a little olive oil or pork fat (handy if you're planning on cooking sausages as well).
The exception to the rule is bacon joints, which should be boiled in (weak) brine.
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

re: Broiling

From the CfE glossary: To cook food directly under the heat source. Typically refers to placing food immediately under an oven broiler.

Most ovens (at least in America) have a broil function where the flame comes from above allowing you to place food directly under the heating element. Other ovens only have one heating element (at the bottom) and have a tray where you broil below the heating element.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Glen
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some light -
Broil = Grill depending on which part of the world you live in.
Microwave your bacon between two paper plates to overcome the paper towel problem, also one less dishe to clean.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Glen, so:
Grilling == Bar-be-queing/Char-grilling;
Broiling == Grilling;
Gotta love i18n
Back to top
A1
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'm into cooking myself and the greatest problem a(bout bacon)i've yet to solve is how to cook crispy and straight bacon strips. they usually end up curly and crumbly. will definitely try your suggestions. and any suggestions for making gravy?
Back to top
BobT
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cook bacon in the microwave frequently. I use a flat bacon cooker from Nordicware that is different from the round one referenced above. This is a slanted device so the grease runs off into a depression at one end. I put paper towels (2)under the bacon and flap 2 more over the bacon. The paper absorbs almost all the grease, and the bacon comes out straight and crisp. I can get up to 6 slices on this device. Cook times vary with the cut of bacon, it's thickness and degree of wetness (which varies by brand and indeed in brands from one package to the next)and number of slices on the cooker.

I cook the bacon for 2-3 minutes on high power and then turn the cooker plate 180 degrees. After using the microwave for several years, I can gauge the time needed to finish the cooking depending on doneness at this time.

The downside to using the microwave, IMO, is that the bacon comes out almost too crisp vs. using a frying pan. Pros are the speed of cooking, ease of cleanup, and straight strips when cooked.

Cook's Illustrated has an article on cooking bacon in the oven. This is a subscription magazine, but, maybe this link will work to see the article. They use a little different approach than our host did in his test which obviates burning the bacon, but, is a bit work intensive compared to the microwave. Here is the link

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/article.asp?did=476
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bake it!
Baking bacon gives superior results to pan frying, it saves your sckin (no grease splatters), it requires less active work time for the cook, an entire package can be made on one baking sheet and it doesn't stink up the house as much.
Trust me, one package or bacon spread out on a jelly roll pan in a 350 oven is the way to go.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bake *all of it*. I like to bake up two pounds (or more) of bacon at a time in the convection oven. Most of it goes into zip locks in the freezer. Then when I need a piece or two I just give it a quick warm up in a pan (if I want a little bacon fat) or in the microwave.

This way you only need to do the big messy clean up once in a while.
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have read that Protein 'curls' above approximately 170', and consequently I try and cook protein slowly, and attempt to avoid 'curling the protein'. I also note that most meat thermometers state 'doneness' at +/- 170'. This also seems to work cooking broths, soups, stews etc., as there is less crud (protein??) floating on top. Apparently, also, when the protein is 'cooked' the food won't stick to a non-coated pan or grill. When the food can be 'pushed (not sticking!) it is the earliest, a good time to flip or move.
Back to top
Philiip
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

George Foreman works great. Grease slides all down into a tray.. It doesn't get wavy and cooks both sides at the same time Smile
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just use a Pyrex square pan (the kind you would cook Lasagna in), in the microwave. Every three minutes I drain it. You can cook 1/2 a pound of bacon this way, and it is a lot easier than frying.
Back to top
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1626
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Oct 14, 2005 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

re: microwaving bacon

I must have a small microwave oven... The largest pyrex container that I can fit is an 8 in. square. My bacon is 12 inches long... There's no way I can fit 1 lb. of bacon in the pyrex dish without stacking. Do you microwave them stacked?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Comments Forum All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next
Page 2 of 9

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You can delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group