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Off Topic: African Horned Melon or Kiwano
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Erin
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matt: I think you're talking about a dragon fruit if I'm not mistaken. Plenty of them here Smile
This fruit?
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cookie
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 3:03 pm    Post subject: Kiwano: Mike, *Morningstar, Matt: I tried one of these... Reply with quote

Thank you, Mike, for your reply. You are right. They're all the same family.
*Morningstar, life's too short, you have to try everything (I mean food!) at least once!

Matt, that fruit, about the size of a small pineapple, with red skin, white flesh and black poppy seeds inside is commonly called DRAGON FRUIT. It's a climbing cactus plant from the Cacti family, growing up to 20 foot high with long, thin aerial roots hugging around a host tree for support and big, white Lily like flowers. Coming from the tropical, it's now widely grown in southern California and anywhere with hot or warm climate. Farmers train them onto big wooden posts and keep pruning them to keep the plants down to about 8 foot high for easy picking. A new Dragon Fruit from Israel has red skin, red fresh and black seeds. Bye.
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RobC
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 6:52 am    Post subject: Kiwano Reply with quote

Here in South Africa, particularly in the Galagadi desert one finds a huge variaty of similar curcurbits, some edible some not. The Koisan use them a lot, the inedible types are harvested for the seeds wich are edible, the edibile types are eaten more for the moisture content than anything else.
Thanks Mike for featuring an African fruit, albeit a tad inedible. Pity the durn Kiwis have purloined it and are selling it as their own. :-)
Thanks for the great website/blog.
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Pecunium



Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I first had one of these in the late 80's which was when I last had one.

I did pretty much what you did, and found it to be like gelid grass. Not worth the effort, and certainly not worth the cost.

TK
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Pecunium



Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2005 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We tried making a drink from the one's we'd bought (as this was commended to us). Not much point in that either.

Less unpleasant than wheat grass juice, but still more than it was worth.

Now, if the poster who said they improve as they age, maybe I'll give one another try.

TK
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GRT8W9
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2005 11:35 am    Post subject: I thougt it was bad Reply with quote

I purchased a Kiwano, (I have no idea what I paid for it, shame on me). I thought it would be good. The sticker on it said it was sweet and refreshing. I took the thing home, opened it up and mine looked just like the one in the picture. Not having seen one before, when I cut into mine I thought it might have been rotten or diseased because it did not smell sweet or look refreshing at all!
Glad to know that I don't have to try it again!
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engineer's delight
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 6:26 pm    Post subject: African Horned Melon and other experiences Reply with quote

For an "exotic" fruit that tastes pretty good, try the Cherimoya. It is sold in local grocery stores, though it too can be a bit spendy. When ripe, it feels heavy and firm, like an avocado just prior to being ripe. You cut it in half, scoop the seeds out (although you can eat them, they're bitter if chewed), and eat the white, creamy interior. It tastes like a type of custard, and is best when ice-cold. Enjoy!
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Nevermore Farm
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2005 11:24 pm    Post subject: Horned Melon Reply with quote

I enjoyed your post. I have a small farm and these horned melons were one of my random heirloom vegetable selections for this year. I have dozens of them ripening on their trellis. I am not entirely sure what we'll do with them all, except for save a lot of seeds and give them away as Christmas gifts Big smile
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2005 1:40 am    Post subject: Cucumber family Reply with quote

Wow! It is so nice to read that a lot of melons are in the same family as cucumbers. I do not care for cucmbers and most melons and have often commented that the sweet melons have a base flavor of cucumber and that is why I do not care for them. Most people have laughed at me for the comparison but now I have ammunition to back up my dislike. Thanks!
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DuxIl



Joined: 23 Sep 2005
Posts: 16
Location: Duxbury, Massachusetts

PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2005 3:16 pm    Post subject: Why are we getting so many weird fruits/veges these days? Reply with quote

After reading your analysis and the descriptions of the flavor, the question that begs for an answer is Why? If these things taste as gross as they sound, other than for decorative reasons, I cannot imagine using them, and at $4 apiece, I cannot imagine budgeting for them in good conscience.

Has anyone come across any recipes using these things? I have not despite a pretty exhaustive search.

This brings me to the question: Why are people even bothering to breed/cultivate/export these things? There are a number of new things available at local markets that fall into the same category - weird, unusual but basically not really something I would want to serve guests. Chayote squash comes to mind, for one.
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Rabidstoat
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2005 1:31 pm    Post subject: Ooh, I got one today! Reply with quote

I just bought one today and, having no idea what it was, did a google web search. Aha! A horned melon.

I'm not sure if I'm brave enough to try it. I suppose I'll slice it open eventually, it's here at work, and see if I can coax someone else into eating it. It was such an antagonistic looking fruit and, like others, I was lulled in by the 'cool and refreshing' sticker. Apparently it lied. Ah well. Maybe I'll find something cool experimentally one of these days.

Oh, and like you, I paid 4 bucks. Talk about sticker shock!
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iyaseven
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2005 3:16 am    Post subject: kiwano Reply with quote

i bought a few here in seattle the other day. i only paid: three for a dollar, so compared to other buyers i got a deal. from the bland sour taste i think it would take on the character of any dish one would prepare. somewhat like tofu. one could sweeten it or use as a vinaigrette. lots of ideas on this site. think i'll buy some more and let my imagination take control.

thanks
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chase
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2005 1:46 am    Post subject: horned melon Reply with quote

My son was insistent on buying this exotic looking melon from the Dekalb Farmers Market - my husband bought it for him because it was marked 20% off. A suggested way to serve was to puree with sugar and put over ice cream or yogurt. I wish we would have seen this web site before the puree - my husband pureed the seeds with some of the rind! Needless to say, it was pretty disgusting. I would not recommend this fruit considering how expensive it is and the taste it delivers.
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ann
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2005 6:13 pm    Post subject: horned melons Reply with quote

hi
we grow lots of horned melons here in portugal. they are a great source of vitamin C and we love them with a little brown sugar. they have a taste inbetween a kiwi and a banana. seeds are a problem however.
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Tracyt
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2005 11:53 pm    Post subject: horned melon Reply with quote

Great site- we had a similar experience... I told my boyfriend to "surprise me" when he went to the supermarket and this is what he came home with... I'm not sure if I was more surprised when I cut it open or when he said that he paid $4 for it. Anyway after checking out this and a few other sides I added ice and honey and made a smoothie- interesting flavor but even better after I added a can of fruit cocktail, oh well, so much for my exotic smoothie...
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