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Sharpening Steel technique - Why stroke toward yourself?

 
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Larry Renger
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2008 9:38 pm    Post subject: Sharpening Steel technique - Why stroke toward yourself? Reply with quote

How come all the chefs and instructions have you stroke the blade over a sharpening steel with the edge toward yourself? You could achieve the same angles with more safety stroking away. Is there something to the shape of the grooves, or what?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think chefs are taught to run blades on a sharpening steel towards their own bodies as a safety measure to other people working in a cramped commercial kitchen.
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a good idea. Take that grooved steel which is nothing more than an edge ruining file and throw it in the trash can. You should take a look under magnification at the damage these buggers do. If you're using soft steel knives like Germans or French, get a glass smooth steel to realign the edges when they roll. If you're using hard steel knives like most Japanese get either a ceramic steel or a borosilicate steel to touch up the edges.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 972
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

buzzard767 wrote:
I have a good idea. Take that grooved steel which is nothing more than an edge ruining file and throw it in the trash can. You should take a look under magnification at the damage these buggers do.


please describe the damage they do so I know what to look for.

I have a 10x, 15x, and 25x loupe - so I'll go look if you can tell me what to look for and I suppose you should add "why" what I'm looking for is "bad"
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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert wrote:
buzzard767 wrote:
I have a good idea. Take that grooved steel which is nothing more than an edge ruining file and throw it in the trash can. You should take a look under magnification at the damage these buggers do.


please describe the damage they do so I know what to look for.

I have a 10x, 15x, and 25x loupe - so I'll go look if you can tell me what to look for and I suppose you should add "why" what I'm looking for is "bad"


Jagged.

Why? Smooth polish cuts better. It's an old argument but "toothy" is an excuse for not knowing how to sharpen. I do. Here's just some of my stuff - not a grooved steel in sight.

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buzzard767



Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's something I upped to another forum a couple days ago. It's all about high end edge polishing. True sharp has nothing to do with ripping up an edge with a grooved steel.

Quote:

Scrubbed bull pranced into my house this morning.

Diamond spray is magical. I will NEVER use it on knives other than my own (too sharp).

I gave the leather one light coat, rubbed it in, and let dry. This was followed by a second coat somewhat heavier than the first. Both coats were sucked up rapidly by the leather. After drying, a third, heavy coat was applied, heavy enough so that I had standing liquid. I rubbed it in and waited for it to dry. Patience lost, the Takeda Gyuto was stropped, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. Yesterday after chromium oxide, it push cut (edit: computer paper) 15/16" from the pinch. Now, post diamond, full push cutting was easily obtained at 1 3/4" and partial (about 1/4" deep) at 2 1/8". This stuff is infrickn'credible. End quote:
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 352
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

buzzard767 wrote:


Jagged.

Why? Smooth polish cuts better. It's an old argument but "toothy" is an excuse for not knowing how to sharpen. I do. Here's just some of my stuff - not a grooved steel in sight.


Smooth is the way, just like using a strop to polish the edge of a straight razor. Juicy.

Biggles
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