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Kitchen Notes: Brining
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Diablo



Joined: 26 Mar 2009
Posts: 1
Location: Fresno

PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 7:58 pm    Post subject: Yes, Brining does have a place Reply with quote

and if you want to see the ratios again, here they are; From another post...

150 g in 1 gallon of water is about 4.0% solution, 110 g is a 3% solution and 210 g is about 5.5%....
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 4:36 am    Post subject: Osmosis Reply with quote

Brining is consistent with the laws of osmosis. There are other solutes besides salt that you have to consider including other electrolytes as well as proteins and carbohydrates. The cytosol inside the cells would have a higher total solute concentration than the brine solution and therefore water will be drawn into the cell. Salt will also be drawn into the cells by the same mechanism.
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guest
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PostPosted: Sun May 17, 2009 8:59 pm    Post subject: vinegar Reply with quote

Ok, I understand that this is a chemical process, what if an acid is introduced to the brine, like mixing in some vinegar?
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isetam
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 6:07 am    Post subject: letting turkey rest after brining Reply with quote

It's Tuesday night - I put the 25 pound turkey in to brine and planned on taking it out tomorrow around noon, and then cooking it at noon on Thursday - is that to long to let it rest? BTW - it's a very freshly killed turkey(like 2 days ago)
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Jeff (guest)
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2009 3:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does brining really work? Here is a picture of a chicken breast that was immersed in a recommended brining solution (1 cup salt in 2 gallons liquid) with added blue Rit dye for 16 hours. Judge for yourself.

[/img]
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Guest






PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2009 5:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeff (guest) wrote:
Does brining really work? Here is a picture of a chicken breast that was immersed in a recommended brining solution (1 cup salt in 2 gallons liquid) with added blue Rit dye for 16 hours. Judge for yourself.

But, is this a good test? Are the dye molecules similar size to the sodium and chlorine ions in the water after dissolving the salt? I don't know what the answer is, but I thought I'd pose the question...
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First time briber
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:51 pm    Post subject: Rinsing after brining Reply with quote

Hi I have read some recipes that call for fresh water rinsing and then drying before cooking, other recipes don't mention it, just cook when straight out of the brine.

Any opinions please?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 8:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Rinsing after brining Reply with quote

First time briber wrote:
Hi I have read some recipes that call for fresh water rinsing and then drying before cooking, other recipes don't mention it, just cook when straight out of the brine.

Any opinions please?

It really depends on the recipe, length of the brining time, and concentration of the brine. I suggest you cook the recipe once without rinsing to see if it's too salty on the exterior of the protein. Drying the protein can help with browning, so that may be a good step to take regardless of if you rinse or do not (if you plan on browning the meat). If you don't have the luxury of multiple attempts at the recipe, I would rinse and pat dry - then prepare the meal as planned. Exterior salting can always be done just before service or during the meal.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 1:28 am    Post subject: What Do You Mean Snake Oil?? Reply with quote

I have a friend that brined his chicken for 3 hours - it soaked up so much brine he had to cook it longer to get it up to temp, and when he went to cut it, the juices gushed out overflowing the carving plate and went all over the kitchen. javascript:emoticon('Laughing Out Loud')
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Maggie
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 6:10 am    Post subject: brining Reply with quote

Never heard of brining pork but will give it a try.
We (Floridians) fish a lot and brine the filets in salt water overnight, prior to smoking them....I'm wondering if anyone has tried a salt & sugar brining solution for fish...?
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mommaarcona
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 06, 2010 12:23 am    Post subject: Brining, curing, and Ceviche? Reply with quote

Wow! lots of comments on this post. I am in culinary school and I notice the difference that brines have on meats. I made a brine for pork chops and added brown sugar and molasses along w/ spices I'm not going to name (sorry). And a good 24 hr soaking time. Fabulous. I've never had pork chops that were so moist. However Brining fish is not recommended. Brining should really only be used when you want to retain moisture in the item you are cooking, like pork chops, turkey and chicken. Fish is better being cured. Using a mixture of brown sugar and kosher salt with a pinch of Prague powder #1 (curing salt - it's pink) and other spices. If you are going to cure your fish and smoke it this is the best way. Make sure you put it in a perforated pan over another pan to allow the moisture from the fish to drain. Cover is loosely and place in a refrigerator under 40 degrees F.
For any brine acidic products are not recommended as they will cause the proteins to coagulate giving your food a cooked texture.

Ceviche: someone mentioned wanting an explanation of why ceviche is the way it is. Ceviche is a raw fish (usually shrimp or prawns) that have been marinated in an acidic mixture. The acids coagulate the proteins in the fish and create a cooked texture, even turning the shrimp pink.
Any other inquiries or if you have questions about what I've typed, please e-mail me at marcona@sbcglobal.net.
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WH Bonney
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reducing Salt Intake Reply with quote

By now we all know that most adults would do well to reduce their sodium intake because sodium increases blood pressure.

So would the brining still work if something other than sodium chloride was disolved in the water? Maybe potassium chloride or a mixture of postassium and sodium chloride. Or even sugar.

I can't think of a way to calculate how much additional sodium goes into a serving of the turkey ... maybe it's not enough to worry about.

Ideas?
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Tim M
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 01, 2010 7:34 pm    Post subject: Brining Reply with quote

In order to reduce the amount of brine solution put the meat and a small amount of brining solution in a plastic bag then immerse the sealed bag in a water filled container such as a pot or ice chest. Use enough brine to cover the meat to about 1/2 inch or so when immersed. This will insure the meat is completely surrounded by brining solution while using less salt, etc with the ability to add ice to the surrounding water without diluting the brine.
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Guest






PostPosted: Fri Nov 19, 2010 9:17 pm    Post subject: Several site explaining additional sodium added by brining. Reply with quote

I spent most of a vacation day researching this and have found a few explanations as to the amount of additional sodium brining adds. I have posted them here, if anyone cares help spread them please feel free as they were difficult to find and a large group of people are looking for this information. Hope this helps.

http://old.cbbqa.org/articles/Salt/SaltBrining.html
http://www.cooksillustrated.com/howto/print/detail.asp?docid=1630
http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/03/23/brining_meats_sodium_add_calculation

Charlie
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maf
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 11:49 pm    Post subject: how long can you keep brine meat before cooking Reply with quote

I just need to know how long can you keep the chicken breast after brining?
In other words can you brine at night for 2 hours, wash and refrigerate to cook the next day? Can you freeze brine meat?
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