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Kyoto Green Pan
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CookNewb
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2008 10:10 am    Post subject: Kyoto Green Pan Reply with quote

Anyone try the Kyoto Green Pan? Is not supposed to release harmful gases if overheated unlike Teflon.

http://www.green-pan.com/dev/ae/html/technology.html
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sat Jul 26, 2008 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am very interested. I like non-stick for many types of cooking and a super-high temperature (450C/850F) pan would be very welcome. Unfortunately, these pots and pans still need all the care of a teflon/PTFE pan to protect the non-stick properties.

I looked it up on Amazon. Does anybody know the difference between the 8" GreenPan that sells for $70 and the Martha Stewart GreenPan that sells for $19.95? The handles look different, but both are Thermolon, the non-stick made by GreenPan. I can't tell from the descriptions how the pan itself varies. Is the difference the profit each distributor is willing to make? Martha can certainly make it up in volume because the product carries her name.

I might have to do another one of my famous side by side by side by side comparison tests!
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william gunnar



Joined: 27 Sep 2008
Posts: 3
Location: Boston, MA area

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi.

Save your money. Buy neither. Just marketing exploits based on silicone-polyesters, poor durability.

Funny, a reliable source told me Home Shopping Network had a return rate over 25% in a single day, carrying related products.

Too bad for DuPont and the others. They're really getting a bad rap. But, that's another story...

Enjoy your weekend.

William Gunnar
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lloydrep



Joined: 22 Sep 2008
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are truly interested in non-stick pans that are durable and functional, take a look at our cookware. Sorry for the advertising, but these pans are really remarkable. They are lightweight, get hot fast and are not Teflon nor have PTFE in the coating. The non-stick coating is water based with no pollutants in the manufacturing and no toxic substances on the pan to come off in your food. Our pans are all made in the USA. Ask where your pans are made.

They are so hard, you can actually take a quarter and rub it hard on the back side of a pan, hard and long enough to build up heat. When you look at the pan you will notice some marks...this is the quarter wearing off on the pan! Try that with your pan.

These products are sold to commercial kitchens are hardly discovered by consumers. Check out the website at lloydpans.com

Lloyd Rep
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 352
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lloydrep wrote:
If you are truly interested in non-stick pans that are durable and functional, take a look at our cookware. Sorry for the advertising, but these pans are really remarkable. They are lightweight, get hot fast and are not Teflon nor have PTFE in the coating. The non-stick coating is water based with no pollutants in the manufacturing and no toxic substances on the pan to come off in your food. Our pans are all made in the USA. Ask where your pans are made.

They are so hard, you can actually take a quarter and rub it hard on the back side of a pan, hard and long enough to build up heat. When you look at the pan you will notice some marks...this is the quarter wearing off on the pan! Try that with your pan.

These products are sold to commercial kitchens are hardly discovered by consumers. Check out the website at lloydpans.com

Lloyd Rep


They sure are small, 10.5" fry pans won't hold all my food. I need something that I can at least fry a slice of streaky bacon in.

Biggles
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

/q
They are so hard, you can actually take a quarter and rub it hard on the back side of a pan, hard and long enough to build up heat.
/uq

I don't use the back side of any pan to cook in.
What happens if you rub as quarter on the inside?

the web site says all the things the coating is not,
there is no information about what the coating _is_,
I presume it fits the prior definition: "based on silicone-polyesters, poor durability "?
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 352
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dilbert wrote:
/q
They are so hard, you can actually take a quarter and rub it hard on the back side of a pan, hard and long enough to build up heat.
/uq

I don't use the back side of any pan to cook in.
What happens if you rub as quarter on the inside?

the web site says all the things the coating is not,
there is no information about what the coating _is_,
I presume it fits the prior definition: "based on silicone-polyesters, poor durability "?


I believe he needs to send Meathenge a review fry pan, eh?

Biggles
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 971
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Biggs -

not to worry - I'm certain it'll come with the evaluation set of Cutco knives.
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william gunnar



Joined: 27 Sep 2008
Posts: 3
Location: Boston, MA area

PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 1:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, again.

I do applaud new products. And I sure didn't mean to come across sounding negative. I mean, sure, the concept of sustainable non stick at higher temperatures sounds great.

Manufacturers of the Kyoto Green Pan must be in this for the long haul. Because, once you get past the marketing, the product must ultimately stand on its own legs, right?

Maybe the vice presidential candidates can hash this one out tonight. Add Chef Ramsey, eggs over easy and crispy bacon...now that's drama.
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CookNewb
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not familiar with silicone-polyesters. What are they? Are they as non-stick as Teflon?
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guest
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 22, 2008 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just bought 2 of these saucepans at TKMAX in the uk and I am impressed so far.
Russel Hobbs (green pan) brand look the same.
The nonstick is excellent.
I can't speak to durability as only had them a week.
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CookNewb
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 2:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So to list all the different non stick coatings available:

Teflon and Silverstone : Both are the same and off gas toxic fumes at higher temperatures. AT 240 C release of PTFE particles has been observed.

Dura-Kote: Used in Lloyd brand pans (lloydpans.com). From the website (http://lloydpans.com/coatings.aspx):"[Our] non-stick coatings outperform and outlast any other cookware finish with little or no special seasoning or handling, at temperatures up to 525 degrees Fahrenheit. Our products are 100% PTFE and Teflon-free." Not sure i want to find out what happens past that temp... hmm...

Thermolon: Kyoto GreenPan, Martha Stewart Greenpan, and others. Can withstand 850F / 450C without any problem (according www.thermolon.com). Primary made from silicone-polyester.

Ceram-Eco: Powdwered ceramic particles are baked on to the surface of the pan. Cannot use abrasives to clean pan. Safe to a really high temperature. Reviews on efficacy are miixed.

Silicone: Used only for oven baking.

Enamel Coated cast iron or copper: expensive, heavy but fine at very high temperatures and won'l't burn food.

Am I missing anything?
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CookNewb wrote:
. . . . . Am I missing anything?



Yes! If you go to the DuPont or teflon sites, I forget which, there are descriptions of about six grades of teflon and a few of them are in use today. They mostly differ in their durability, but there are notable differences. The manufacture of teflon coated cookware may use compounds that off-gas or decompose at high temperatures, but teflon itself is inert. Pots and pans are tools, and as with any tool in any industry, if you use it properly, it will do what it is supposed to do and give good service.

As far as teflon is concerned, the PTFE itself is completely safe. It has been used for well over twenty years in many surgical/reconstructive procedures from cardiac and vascular grafts, hernia repair, orthopedics, brain/neurosurgery (stay implanted forever), periodontal and oral surgical regenerative grafts (stay implanted for weeks to months during the tissue regeneration).

Teflon saves lives.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are 100% correct about the safety of PTFE. It is an inert material. In the fields you just described, PTFE indeed saves lifes. The big difference bewteen cardiac and vascular grafts, hernia repair and cookware is the temperature. Cookware is made to heat up. And PTFE cannot stand temperatures above 500F without giving off fumes.
I also checked some sites on Thermolon. According the info I found, it is a sol-gel process and not a silicone-polyester. Silicone-polyesters are organic and not mineral.
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Lin
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2008 11:59 pm    Post subject: non-stick cookwear Reply with quote

I have read all of the postings here about non-stick cookwear but have yet to see any mention of titanium.
I pitched my starting-to-peal teflon type frying pan after about a year of gentle but frequent use. I found large cast iron pans were very heavy and therefore awkward. After some research we decided to invest in German made titanium cookwear. We have had the first piece we purchased for ten months now and use it continuously. We have added two smaller pans and continue to be delighted with the way they brown foods, need little or no added oil, and clean up with ease.
Although the initial outlay seemed large we have no regrets and have not encountered any information about health concerns with these pans.
Hope this info adds to the lively discussion.
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