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Wagyu Beef.

 
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Wine and Food tube



Joined: 03 Jun 2008
Posts: 12
Location: World wide

PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 1:34 am    Post subject: Wagyu Beef. Reply with quote

There are all kinds of stories about these cattle from Japan that are massaged, fed on beer and then sold at extremely high prices in Tokyo's top restaurants.

The Japanese have dedicated so much care and attention to the rearing of this breed of cattle, focusing on the quality rather than the quantity of their beef. The result is the ‘caviar of beef’. Wagyu also known as Kobe-style beef, the meat from these cattle are known worldwide for its marbling characteristics, it has a naturally enhanced flavor, tenderness and juiciness, and a high market value. Grocery stores in the United States will sell cuts of American Wagyu for $40/lb to $150/lb.
Because of the Wagyu cattle's special diet including beer and sake, wagyu beef contains a higher percentage of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids than typical beef. The marbling also improves the ratio of monounsaturated fats to saturated fats.

There are four major breeds of Wagyu (wa means Japanese, and gyū means cattle, or simply "Japanese cow"): Japanese Black, Japanese Brown, Japanese Polled, and Japanese Shorthorn. Japanese breed names include: Tajima, Tottori, Shimane, Kochi and Kumamoto.
View video of Wagyu beef.

http://www.wineandfoodtube.com/tube/view/0/raising-the-steaks-6333/
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rachard1583



Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some say that this steak is a gourmet treat. The Wagyu are cattle that produces beef products that have less fat marbled throughout. This beef is a very tender and scrumptious type of beef.

You can also use any recipes for steak for your recipes for Wagyu steak.
Here is one more great recipe to try:

You will need:
2 pounds of Wagyu steak. 2 tablespoons of oil, 1 crushed clove of garlic, salt and pepper. Mix together the oil, garlic, salt and pepper.
Now, spread this mixture evenly over the steak. Place in a covered dish and refrigerate for 2 hours. Broil or grill your Wagyu steaks until desired doneness.
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biggreeneggic



Joined: 04 Mar 2012
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2012 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can anyone comment on the actual taste of Waygu, as compared to USDA Prime or Choice cuts? I have also heard Waygu is the best of the best, butI have never actually tasted it. Part of me feels that the preparation is equally important as the cut of beef.
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

biggreeneggic wrote:
Can anyone comment on the actual taste of Waygu, as compared to USDA Prime or Choice cuts? I have also heard Waygu is the best of the best, butI have never actually tasted it. Part of me feels that the preparation is equally important as the cut of beef.

In my opinion, the proper preparation of a cut of beef is more important than the quality of the cut. A properly prepared unmarbled piece of beef is generally better tasting than poorly prepared wagyu beef. If both are properly prepared, then dishes that benefit from additional the extra fat of wagyu beef will be better / beefier / more tender with wagyu of the same or higher quality (such as steaks). Beef stew does not benefit.

Also, all wagyu are not created equal. The US raised wagyu cattle including akaushi that I've seen tends to be leaner and closer to USDA Choice / USDA Prime. A5 graded wagyu from Japan is extremely expensive but a whole different product when compared side-by-side with non-Japanese wagyu. The marbling on A5 is so high that one can almost claim that it looks like there are more flecks of fat than there is muscle.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1006
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought I posted to this, but I guess user error rules again.

we've had it in so-so places, not worth it, and we've had it in high end joints (ala Craftsteak) where DW pronounced it the best beef she's ever eaten.

this site has interest pix of the various grades
http://www.wagyukobebeef.com/
note Feb 2014: link broken

a brief overview of the grading system(s)
http://www.mishimaranch.com/gradingsystem.html

and here's some interesting prices....
http://www.brentwoodtradinggroup.com/kobefimist.html
note Feb 2014: link broken
http://www.brentwoodtradinggroup.com/wagyubeef.html
note Feb 2014: link broken


Last edited by Dilbert on Sun Feb 09, 2014 9:14 pm; edited 1 time in total
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claire



Joined: 24 Mar 2012
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2012 5:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like to eat beef, it is delicious and wonderful, thank you for sharing your post. Teasing
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