Cooking For Engineers Forum Index Cooking For Engineers
Analytical cooking discussed.
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

128228

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Tools, Equipment, and Gadgets
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kate



Joined: 25 Aug 2005
Posts: 1
Location: Berkeley, CA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2005 2:36 am    Post subject: 128228 Reply with quote

In fact, as long as you get enough calories to meet your energy needs, it?s might be the cause of a Cholesterol is a fat-like material. It is
palucci, you are not alone, dear friend SOOOOO many times, I will write something and not remember what I wrote and I raed over it and I think what the f**!! I think its very common too I feel
It was a fine autumn day in Toronto The sun was shining, birds were chirping, and my friend Dave and I had somehow scored free baseball tickets Neither one of us cared a whit about professional spor
Oil SHOULD be compatible with wet clutch. Not all motorcycle oil is good enough. If you want to use car oil, DO YOUR RESEARCH, and make sure saving $10.00 a year is worth the risk. Back on topic.


Last edited by kate on Tue Sep 07, 2010 6:49 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jagstyle



Joined: 08 Aug 2005
Posts: 45
Location: CA

PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2005 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That looks beautiful! I would love to get one if it wasn't so expensive and had room for all my knives. Currently my knives reside in their boxes.

Here is another cool block using magnets:
http://www.bisbellmagnets.com/new.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Dr. Biggles
Guest





PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2005 11:01 pm    Post subject: Knife Block Reply with quote

I got tired of giving real estate to my blocks, sose I moved over to mounting the magnetic rigs on my wall above a few of my work stations. More room for food and my clumsy elbows.

Biggles
Back to top
cynicalb



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 12:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Kate,

Doesn't matter regarding wood - buy the one that looks best on your counter. Keeping you knives in a wood block should not dull the edges - steel is much harder than wood. The only exception that I can think of is if you had a block made from ipe (ironwood) or other wood that has a high silica content, as that could dull a blade, but I think even in a block it wouldn't matter, unless you made a habit of chopping, slicing, or cutting the block. None of the woods that you mention are high silica woods. And, as long as the knives are clean and dry when you put them in it there should be no concern regarding bacteria or other sludge growing in it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
enjoycookin
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:58 am    Post subject: My Warther Knife Block Reply with quote

I really enjoy my Warther knife set. They stay sharp and are very durable. They have a website that has more information about them.
I think its www.warthers.com
Back to top
Guest






PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2006 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw the Kapoosh Universal Knife Block in a local cooking shop. It was really effortless to slip the test knives they had into. Just an interesting take on the knife block I guess.
Back to top
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Mon May 29, 2006 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cynicalb wrote:
Doesn't matter regarding wood - buy the one that looks best on your counter. Keeping you knives in a wood block should not dull the edges - steel is much harder than wood. The only exception that I can think of is if you had a block made from ipe (ironwood) or other wood that has a high silica content, as that could dull a blade, but I think even in a block it wouldn't matter, unless you made a habit of chopping, slicing, or cutting the block. None of the woods that you mention are high silica woods. And, as long as the knives are clean and dry when you put them in it there should be no concern regarding bacteria or other sludge growing in it.


How does wood, other than petrified wood get sillica in it, and which are high silica woods to avoid?


A knife block should hold the knives horizontally, lying on the flat side of the blade, rather than vertically, on the cutting edge. Because I have a lot of knives, I am using two knife blocks now, one horizontal and one vertical, and while I can't say the vertical one dulls the knives, but the base of the vertical slots are showing significant wear from the knives sliding in and out, while the horizontally oriented knives do not seen to be cutting into the wood the same way. I designed a knife block layout to hold all my knives and cleavers plus several more I might eventually purchase in moments of weakness. A summer project for me is to buy hard wood boards, or small tiimbers, (I haven't researched exactly how these woods are sold) get some Elmer's exterior grade carpenter's glue, take out my dado set, lock it onto my table saw and cut away, then assemble the mother of all knife blocks to hold all my knives!

Most knife blocks I have seen are made of maple. Does anybody know if cherry, walnut, mahogany or other decorative hardwoods would be suitable from a durability standpoint?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Taamar



Joined: 09 Mar 2006
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you have a vertical block just put the knives in it upside down.

I use a knife magnet, you just have to be careful not to nick the blade.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cynicalb



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2006 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi GP,

First, a disclaimer - I am not a forest products scientist, not do I play one. From what meager knowledge that I have, the silica is just part of the wood - certain species have more than others. Its presence quickly dulls tools if not machined properly. Here are a couple of links:

http://www.eastteak.com/exoticlumber.php
http://www.woodworking.com/article_archive.cfm?section=6&article=545

Regarding which species, I know of ipe' and teak - I'm sure there are others. Considering most knife blocks are made of non-high-silica hardwoods, my point was not to worry about dulling your knives. I would expect that most hardwoods will be about the same - as long as they aren't abused, they'll probably last a lifetime.

cb
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Taamar wrote:
If you have a vertical block just put the knives in it upside down.


Now that's just way too easy!!!!!! Big smile I feel like my IQ just fell about 10 points!

The only counterpoint I could make on that is I would have to turn it over before using it, whereas right-side up or lying on its side, I would just rotate my wrist a quarter turn and I'd be ready to go.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1606
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Taamar wrote:
If you have a vertical block just put the knives in it upside down.

The few knife block manufacturers I've spoken to caution against storing knifes with the blade side up in their blocks. They stated that due to the curvature of western knives, there is increased chance the knife may slip out of the block. The resting of a knife (even edge down) in a block will not noticably dull a blade unless you drag the blade out of the block.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Taamar



Joined: 09 Mar 2006
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wasn't worrying about dulling my knives (a block can't be harder than my cutting board, right?) I was worrying about the multiple scores being a bacteria breeding ground. Cleaning the knife before storing it doesn't address the problem of 'stuff' flying around the kitchen.(If I can get mashed potatoes in the light fixture I can get 'em into the knife block) Depending on the insertion angle, though, the weight distibution of the knife could indeed cause a problem.

I'm a huge fan of knife magnets. And as a bonus, once you've stored your knives that way for a while you can use them to pick up screws that have fallen behind the stove!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Cooking For Engineers Forum Index -> Tools, Equipment, and Gadgets All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group