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the rolls royce of thermometers and the quandry it has me in

 
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 8:13 pm    Post subject: the rolls royce of thermometers and the quandry it has me in Reply with quote

)))Well! I feel like a million dollars with my new red Thermapen, like Biggles has. I love it so much, it is so COOL and works so ...instantly!...I got one for my son and daughter in law as well, a real Lady Bountiful move for their 8th anniversary....So. Yesterday I came home with this thick hunk of cod that I wanted to bake. Immediately, I looked forward to using the Tpen. But researching through recipes on various and sundry websites, none actually gave the ideal internal temperature for a hunk of cod! I looked around the web but still didn't find any chart of temps reletive to doneness of various meat, poultry, fish...pudding? custard? and so on.
Might anyone suggest guidelines or a source of this info? Like rare strip steak, medium rare lamb chops, salmon a point ... defined and an associated temp, etc, etc. when it's time to take the cup custard out of the oven....
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1011
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well, usda with their ultra safe cook it until it bounces approach says 145'F for fish.
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/IsItDoneYet_Magnet.pdf

slightly more helpful:

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/MeatTemperatureChart.htm


Last edited by Dilbert on Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fish at 145F is way too hot don't you think? Maybe the thing is to take the temp and see what it is, then when you think the fish is done, check temp. If it IS done, then that's the right temp, and you can write it down somewhere. Still, I will check the second website you recommended. Thank you)))
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SirShazar



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
various meat, poultry, fish...pudding? custard?


This is coming straight from the Culinary Institute of America's "The Professional Chef":
Quote:

Fresh Beef, Veal, and Lamb
-Rare: 135'F
-Medium Rare: 145'F
-Medium: 160'F
-Well Done: 170'F

Fresh Pork
-Medium: 160'F
-Well Done: 170'F

Ham
-Fresh Ham: 160'F
-Precooked: 140'F

Poultry
-Whole Birds: 180'F
-Poultry breasts: 170'F
-Poultry thighs: 180'F
-Stuffing: 165'F

Ground Meat:
-Turkey, chicken: 165'F
-Beef, Veal, lamb, pork: 160'F

Seafood:
-Fish: 145'F
-Shrimp, lobster, crab: 145'F
-Scallops: 145'F
-Clams, mussels, oysters: 145'F


Custards coagulate at around 212'F, but the vessel they're cooked in usually stores enough heat to overcook them if you wait till it heats to 212'F.

Speaking of 212'F, thats also the temperature when cakes and breads are done; but again, carryover heat can be very significant.

I'm not really sure about pudding, but then again most puddings are not as sensitive to heat.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1011
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

in my opinion fish at 145'F is suitable for ping pong cod balls, not much more.

usda is ultra conservative - if you read some of their stuff on food prep, storage, etc, you can rapidly reach the conclusion all food is hazardous to your health and should be avoided <g>
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you all for tips and leads. I sense that Dilbert and I are on the same page. When we say rare, we mean it!)))as in the Pittsburgh style black and blue steakso I continue to seek info about internal temps for done and what done means. Bang! I feel like bill clinton...
While the second link suggested above was unavailable, I googled cooking for America and then on their site searched internal temperature, and I came up with this, which is just lovely. Dont you think?

Oops. Originally it was a chart, but I lost the format in copying and pasting. Still, scroll on down for heaps of info.

The chart below is only a guide. You must rely on an accurate Meat Thermometer and start taking temperatures half an hour before the end of the estimated roast time.


What constitutes rare and medium-rare cooked meat?
To satisfy government home economists, the Beef Council says rare beef means an internal temperature of 140 degrees F. Well, that is ok if you like well-done and dry meat. If you like moist, rosy meat (like I do), rare begins at 120 degrees and starts to become medium rare at 125 or 130 degrees. To cook your meat properly, you must purchase and use a good instant-read digital meat thermometer.


Rib Count Approximate Weight Oven Temperature Total Estimated Time Only Meat Thermometer Reading (Rare)
2 ribs 4 to 5 pounds 450/325 F 60 to 70 minutes 120 F
3 ribs 7 to 8.5 pounds 450/325 F 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 hours 120 F
4 ribs 9 to 10.5 pounds 450/325 F 1 3/4 to 2 1/4 hours 120 F
5 ribs 11 to 13.5 pounds 450/325 F 2 1/4 to 2 3/4 hours 120 F
6 ribs 14 to 16 pounds 450/325 F 3 to 3 1/4 hours 120 F
7 ribs 16 to 18.5 pounds 450/325 F 3 1/4 to 4 hours 120 F

Beef Roast Cooking Temperatures

Rare 120 to 125F center is bright red, pinkish toward the exterior portion

Medium Rare 130 to 135F center is very pink, slightly brown toward the exterior portion

Medium 140 to 145F center is light pink, outer portion is brown

Medium Well 150 to 155F not pink

Well Done 160F and above steak is uniformly brown throughout
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1011
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Susan -

I edited that link - looks like I lost the m on the end of htm

ref the prime rib chart - temps are pretty "std fare" but the timing could be all way far gone and off because there is debate about what temperature to roast at.

if you look at some of the discussion here you'll find people roasting as low as 200'F -

personally I use 235'F with a crisping blast (max oven temp, 500'F +) at the end.

ah, "the end" being 125'F per thermal meter . . . to allow for 20 mins at max blast + carry over heat.
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pbone



Joined: 05 Jan 2008
Posts: 99
Location: Dutchess County, NYS

PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, Dilbert, you cave man. Do you take that beef roast out of the 235F oven at 125F internal temp and pop it into a second, preheated 500F oven? Or do you, when roast hits 125F, crank same oven it's already in from 235F up to 500F and leave roast in there for 20 min?

p.s. I found the M...now it's only the "L" that's missing....
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1011
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just crank up the oven it is in ....

hmmm, the link pops up no prob here.

perhaps if you go to
http://whatscookingamerica.net
and do the site search
done temperature

it will work better.
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DrBiggles



Joined: 12 May 2005
Posts: 355
Location: Richmond, CA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 1:21 am    Post subject: Re: the rolls royce of thermometers and the quandry it has m Reply with quote

susan pettibone wrote:
)))Well! I feel like a million dollars with my new red Thermapen, like Biggles has. I love it so much, it is so COOL and works so ...instantly!...I got one for my son and daughter in law as well, a real Lady Bountiful move for their 8th anniversary....So. Yesterday I came home with this thick hunk of cod that I wanted to bake. Immediately, I looked forward to using the Tpen. But researching through recipes on various and sundry websites, none actually gave the ideal internal temperature for a hunk of cod! I looked around the web but still didn't find any chart of temps reletive to doneness of various meat, poultry, fish...pudding? custard? and so on.
Might anyone suggest guidelines or a source of this info? Like rare strip steak, medium rare lamb chops, salmon a point ... defined and an associated temp, etc, etc. when it's time to take the cup custard out of the oven....


I wouldn't get wrapped too tightly about temperatures of everything at every stage. Temperature is just a guideline, you also need a sense of smell, taste, visuals and texture.

You don't want to make yourself sick, or over-cook the tri-tip. Be afraid of levees breaking and your children dying in a war. Don't be afraid of custard.

Biggles
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like to take the meat out of the low temperature oven 225 or 235F when it reaches "rare" at 120-125 and keep it covered on the counter. When I take it out, I crank the oven up all the way to 550F and let it "heat soak" for several minutes so it is really hot all around and the entire oven is a very hot radiant surface. Then I put the roast back in for eight to ten minutes to get a thin, slightly hard crust. That avoids the heat-up time from 225F to 550F (which can be lengthy in some ovens) and cook the outer layer of beef to well done (beyond the crust), despite the center still being rare to medium rare.
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IDontUse
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For cod always cook to 145, many other fish such as salmon are much better to keep at a medium - medium rare, unless you can't handle raw fish.

That CIA book must be old, those temps are wrong.
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