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Recipe File: Homemade Mayonnaise
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 7:57 pm    Post subject: mayo Reply with quote

i decided to make some mayonnaise one home ec lesson, and after hearing my mum's dreadful storys about how NOT to make mayonnaise i checked out this receipe and it worked perfectly! Cheers!
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janka
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 5:04 pm    Post subject: mayo Reply with quote

Hi!
I always use whole eggs in my mayo and it NEVER failed. I actually wonder why the cook books are full of hints how to "save" your mayo... ;-)
My mum used her blender. The European blenders have a dripping hole in the cover, so the oil will definitely just drop in...
I use the "blender stick" and a rather narrow and high measuring cup (about 1 quart volume). I put the egg, some lemon juice or vinegar, salt, pepper and mustard in the cup. I mix until everything combines, then add the oil (I use sunflower seed) rather slowly. I have no clue how much oil is needed as I simply add oil until the desired consistency is reached.
My mum would sometimes make her own tartar sauce. With the blender still running, add pickles, onions and whatever you like. Voila!
As for using raw eggs - I eat eggs, even raw ones, since my childhood. I used different eggs, from "cage" to organic, and never had problems. Actually, my aunt working in a hotel got salmonella (and other guests) form a pasteurised, packed whole eggs! So much for the theory of heating the eggs to kill the bacteria...
PS-great page! I tried the bacon-in-the-oven-method and will use only this one from now on! Thanks!
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luckyboy
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:55 am    Post subject: milk mayonnaise Reply with quote

ok, much have been said about mayonnaise, but anyone ever tried to do it with milk instead of eggs? I´ve learned this in a cooking class and let me say that is really good too! And have the advantage: you never have the risk of salmonela, because uses no eggs!

I make it sometimes, and tastes great. Instead of using yolks use about half cup of milk. I heat 1/4 of the milk a little bit and then add the lemon juice, after that mix the rest of the milk and start doing the oil emulsion. Basically the same process as with the egg yolks.

What do you think?
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nanaverm
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2006 12:24 am    Post subject: Milk Mayo Reply with quote

I'll try that, but isn't that like an oiled, blended farmers' cheese? Isn't it homogenized, acid curdled milk with oil?
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orangespot
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:00 am    Post subject: flax seed oil for that healthy and elusive omega 3 Reply with quote

I've never liked the taste of flaxseed oil, so I decided to use it for my mayo experiment. It tasted wonderful! I didn't even use egg yolks, I used egg whites and some mustard to emulsify. Added some onion powder, lemon juice, salt, apple cider vinager and a touch of agave syrup for sweetness.

Second time I tried it, the eggwhites wouldn't stiffen. I threw out 3 batches, including one where I had already begun to add the (expensive) flax oil. It was just too watery. I think the problem was that my wire wisk was coming apart and the wisk was rotating on the stem, this slowed the beating action. I threw the mix into the cuisinart instead, still the eggwhites wouldn't stiffen, but I decided to start adding some cheap olive oil to the mix and suddenly it began to emulsify and thicken. Once again I achieved a perfect, tasty mayo.

mixed with a few herbs, this is very tasty on grilled salmon. spread a layer on before grilling, it forms a nice tangy crust. then use it as a dip after grilling.

BTW, thanks for all the great tips, especially about the pusher on the cuisinart. I'll have to try that.
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SweetpeaNO



Joined: 14 Nov 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 3:15 am    Post subject: the value of this whole thing Reply with quote

i tired something similar to this some time ago and was never able to develop any 'head' so i knew this was going to be an abysmal failure - but that certainly wasn't @ to stop me from trying !

i failed miserably as expected but had to admit that my whisk was LAME-O. So with so much imprtance beingbeing placed on blending and emusifying 'well'..... i went off to 'Linen and things' and promptly bought myself a proper whisk

things certainly looked different using my new whisk but i got exhausted whisking and had to take a break to open a bottle of tylenol as well due to the clanging of my new and improved whisk against the bowl, giving me a rippin' good headache and all. and it made me wonder

it made me wonder how long this ridiculous recipe has to take to dutifully prepare. the instructions and hints offered to other posters who have failed is ONE DROP At A TIME until the 1st 1/3cup of oil is used.

so how long (in actual time increments) is one supposed to whisk between DROPS of oil? even if it's 10seconds..... how many drops of oil are in 1/3cup of oil X 10 seconds?

should this article have been written with the warning DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS WITHOUT A WICKED NICE MIXER AND A WELL PAID ELECTRIC BILL ?

and finally, since much ado has been made @ ading oil too quicly and that your whole project is lost should you add too much oil too quickly - is there a way to know when that has actually 'happened' so we can get a clue as to when to toss it in the trash and begin hopefull anew instead of chasing our aching whisking muscles straight into a fruitless carpal tunnel syndrome?
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1631
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2006 3:39 am    Post subject: Re: the value of this whole thing Reply with quote

SweetpeaNO wrote:
so how long (in actual time increments) is one supposed to whisk between DROPS of oil? even if it's 10seconds..... how many drops of oil are in 1/3cup of oil X 10 seconds?

Whisk until the oil is incorporated into the mixture. For me, that's about 8 strokes or so with the whisk - about two seconds. The unincorporated oil that you drop in looks like a clear glob where ever you drop it into the mixture. After whisking, the globs of clear liquid should no longer exist. If you're a fast whisker, this should not take very long. If it does, add a little less oil next time. If you can't get even a single drop of oil to incorporate, then the recipe has failed.

SweetpeaNO wrote:
and finally, since much ado has been made @ ading oil too quicly and that your whole project is lost should you add too much oil too quickly - is there a way to know when that has actually 'happened' so we can get a clue as to when to toss it in the trash and begin hopefull anew instead of chasing our aching whisking muscles straight into a fruitless carpal tunnel syndrome?

It has failed when you whisk and the oil sloshes around and won't magically disappear into the yellow mixture.
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aradiadawn



Joined: 22 Nov 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Nov 22, 2006 11:05 pm    Post subject: save your time and your wrists Reply with quote

first of all, i'm sooooo glad to have found a site to discuss cooking with intelligent people.

i made my first batch 2 nights ago for chicken salad. went with the whole egg approach. (1 egg, 1 cup oil, 2 T white vin., 1/2 t salt) since i was planning on feeding the salad to my little one, i heated it to 160 first. used veg. oil, and followed your directions, using a whisk. that got to be much too tedious, so i poured all the oil in my mixing bowl, and used my immersion (stick) blender (which by the wy was $20 US at kohl's).

came out FABULOUS!!!!! added some mustard, more salt, a lil pepper, and some garlic powder.

***add some diced chicken and onions for a great chicken salad!***

my point is this: spend the twenty bucks, and the oil process is vitually foolproof--and, cleanup's a snap!
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ludwig
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 24, 2006 7:47 pm    Post subject: Mayonaise Reply with quote

Mayonaise is so easy to prepare that one often wonders why commericial is made. There is a good reason----raw eggs can be dangerous. In certain parts of the country chickens lay salmonella infected eggs. This is normally no problem if the eggs are cooked as the toxins are cooked off and the organism killed. The late 20th century has shown that we can not trust our food supply as we could in the 1940s because some people are not as hygenic as they once were. Spoled mayonaise can kill.

If you prepare your own mayonaise---first make sure the eggs that you are using are salmonella free. Next Never leave homemade mayonaise out of the refrigerator long. Just about any kind of oil can be used but classic mayonaise is always made with Olive Oil. The fastest method is the blender or mixer method into which the eggs are beaten and the oiled drizzled into them. Never omit vinegar---it acts as a preservative and discourages growth of bacteria and salmonella.

If you add Garlic to it while making the mayonaise---it becomes the classic haute cuisine Aioli.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The late 20th century has shown that we can not trust our food supply as we could in the 1940s because some people are not as hygenic as they once were.


Egg safety has nothing to do with people's hygiene, and everything to do with factory farming. Whoever posted above about reducing your risk with organic eggs was right, and also the person who pointed out that Salmonella is very rare is also right. If you buy your eggs from a local organic farmer as I do, and have visited the farm and see happy clean chickens running around pecking in the grass instead of smashed into cages in a factory farm as I have, you will undoubtedly learn a lot and feel a lot better about eating your mayonnaise raw. If you cook the eggs to 160 you lose a lot of valuable enzymes and nutrients, so it's better to buy your eggs from a trusted source and then just make mayo as it has always been made. Add some whey and leave it out for 7 hours to allow the lactobaccilli (the same beneficial bacteria found in yogurt) to culture, thus preserving the mayo and its enzymes. See Sally Fallon's cookbook, "Nourishing Traditions", for more nutritional and lactofermentation info, including how to get whey from yogurt. Incidentally, her blender mayo recipe does not work as well as that of the Joy of Cooking, so I take a hybrid approach--NT ingredients following the JoC methodology.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:51 pm    Post subject: alternative Reply with quote

here's a lightning fast mayonnaise that's aqlso healthier, lower calorie blah blah blah....

- mix plain yogurth with mustard

yes that's all... give it a try the result is surprising and approximates mayonnaise quite accurately. Perfect for lobsters, eggs ...
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Telecom guy in Montreal
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2007 6:22 pm    Post subject: Homemade mayonaise variations Reply with quote

I usually prepare my mayonaise with Dijon, but lemon or vinegar work well. If you add some garlic, parmesan and Worcestershire sauce you get a classic caesar dressing.
Adding just garlic with yield you Aïoli, which is great with cruditées. For an interesting twist you can also add some ginger along with the garlic.
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walter
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 2:27 am    Post subject: comparison Reply with quote

this is different from store bought mayonaisse. it tastes lemony, tastes like i'm drinking oil a bit, i just hope refrigeration thickens it more and improving the flavor.

i don't want to say i like the canned stuff better referring to jellied cranberry, but i'm still open.

i ran out of mayonaisse. what am i to do? i'm glad i had lemons and eggs and oil. oh yeah, i did drop in some tabasco and sugar from looking at other recipes.

so far it's pretty good!
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BobH
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 1:07 am    Post subject: Mayonnaise with an immersion blender Reply with quote

I make mayonnaise regularly, using a Bamix immersion blender, which has the advantage of rotating at 15,000 RPM -- faster, I believe, than most inexpensive immersion blenders (but I don't know if that makes a difference with mayo, since I have never made it with any other sort of immersion blender). There is absolutely no comparison between homemade mayonnaise and commercial mayonnaise, even the consistently excellent Best Foods (Hellmans to you eastern intellectual snobs). Also, homemade is much cheaper.

I make the mayonnaise in the beaker/container that came with the blender; it is rather tall and narrow, and fits the blender quite well -- as you might assume would be the case. After considerable experimentation, here's the method I use: Put into the beaker 1 whole large egg, 1 tsp dry mustard, 1 tsp lemon or lime juice, 1 tsp vinegar (white, rice, apple cider are all good, but balsamic is too sweet), and 1/2 tsp salt. These ingredients together total about 2 fluid ounces, depending on the size of the egg. (I know this because the beaker is graduated in English and metric units.) Add enough extra-virgin olive oil to bring the total to 4 fluid ounces, then enough tasteless oil (I prefer canola or safflower) to bring the total to 12 fluid ounces. IT IS IMPORTANT THAT ALL OF THIS BE AT ROOM TEMPERATURE, OR THE MAYONNAISE WILL NOT EMULSIFY.

Put the blender all the way into the mixture, i.e., so that it is resting on the bottom of the beaker. Turn it on at high speed and count slowly to 10 without moving it. Then slowly move the mixer up and down through the mixture until the mixture is fully emulsified, i.e., thick -- like mayonnaise. The whole mixing process takes perhaps 30 seconds, if that, and it makes 1-1/2 cups (12 fluid oz.) of mayonnaise that will keep for at least two weeks in a tightly-closed container in the refrigerator. If the mixture isn't going to emulsify you'll know right away, because it doesn't even start to thicken and you end up very quickly with oily soup.

By the way: an immersion blender is a great tool, and not just for mayonnaise. I like to cook pureed-vegetable soups in chilly weather, and the immersion blender makes the process extremely easy. It also makes terrific milkshakes, without ice cream.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know how to stabilize any mayo.

Today I started to make flax mayo ... And you know how hard that is.

Flaxseed oil just won't mix.

So I started thinking ... peanuts mix well ... always ...

so I added half a handfull of peanuts to the mayo. viola! thickens in seconds.

I even thing I know why.

Flaxseed oil is mainly ALA ... if you google it a bit you'll find that ALA is very unstable and it's conformation is high energy ... that's why it didn't thicken Smile
vanderwaals bonds were stronger then the hydrogen bonds! Smile so it stayed in oily state instead of the watery state (that's what were doing here ... we're trying to make oil act like water)

it thickened so much i had to add more oil! cause my blender wouldn't blend! Smile

anyway flaxseed oil mayo is great ... you just have to add more lemon juice to make up for the flavor Smile

I don't think lemon juice masks the flavor as much as citric acid bonds with ligands or other compounds that give it the smell.

I did it this way (the second time - you can add peanuts any time you want to thicken it):

blender:
peanuts (1/2 handfull)
lemon juice (2 & 1/2 lemons)
2 whole eggs
salt

blend until smooth

add all the oil (250 mL)

blend until smooth

if you want stronger mayo (thicker) add a few peanuts, if you want smoother, add more lemon juice

I think peanuts can stabilize ANY mayo (protein acts as a stabilizer ... i think it magnifies lecithins action)

Goran Matejcic <svizac@gmail.com>
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