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Recipe File: Cheesecake, Plain New York Style
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Lipstick



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Jul 17, 2011 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This made an excellent birthday cake and all my friends loved it! Thank you Smile
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Guest
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:34 am    Post subject: gooey/liquid centre! Reply with quote

I followed the instructions exactly as the recipe said, as I'm an amateur at baking, and my cheesecake came out gooey from the oven after 2 hours in it
! Is it supposed to be that way? It appears to be rather liquid inside. Will it solidify more when it completely cools?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sounds like it did not finish baking - it probably will not set up further as it cools.

oven temperature dials & indicators are frequently off - so you need to go by how it cooking than just the clock.
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hjkp
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:26 pm    Post subject: Texture, flour, and pans Reply with quote

Regarding the texture, I am getting conflicting feedback from this forum. Following the recipe exactly, is this a fluffy cheesecake or hard and dense cheesecake?

I also would like to know if using the flour would result in a more firm, dense texture...............this is not what I would like! As the flour is optional, are most people just opting out (as in, not using it)?

As far as pans, I have only dark, non-stick spring-form pans...........generally, I am directed by recipes to reduce the temp by 25 degrees F if using dark non-stick. Should I do that with this recipe as well? Further more, I have read that dark non-stick pans have a heat limit, which if passed will cause smoke and other such "fun". Does anyone know if 500 degrees F is doable using dark non-stick pans?

If anyone can answer these questions, I would be most grateful. Thank you in advance!
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1005
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the recipe is for a New York style cheesecake - those are to the dense side - not a whipped frothy style.

the flour will stiffen the mix - it's likely you'd not know if it was made with or without the flour.

cheesecake is best done a lower temps - the initial 500'F temp is not maintained.

the 500'F is safe for non-stick pans for a short period.
keep the 200'F baking temp even with the dark pans.

Teflon aka PTFE starts to off-gas at about 400'F - but in 10 minutes, the pans won't get there.
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grumpy realist
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 2:45 pm    Post subject: putting this all together by hand Reply with quote

I have a family recipe called "Cheese Pie" which consists of a graham cracker crust, a middle layer of cheesecake, and a very thick sour cream topping. (Why I turn up my nose at standard cheesecake.) I've made this multiple times and have never used a mixer. (The recipe dates from WWII and was handed out whenever you bought a $50 war bond.)

For those of you who want to do cheesecake by hand, I have some suggestions:

1. Be very careful of the order in which things are mixed. The cheesecake layer in my family's concoction uses only four ingredients (cream cheese, sugar, eggs, and vanilla) but they definitely need to be mixed in the right order. Mix cream cheese with the sugar first, and the more you can beat it together, the better. The sugar crystals cut up the cream cheese so you don't have solid lumps of cream cheese in your final batter. Then add the rest, a little bit at a time. If you are careful at the first (and mix with a spoon in each hand to squash out any unmixed lumps between the spoons) it isn't that bad. At each stage of addition, make sure that you have your batter as smooth as possible.

2. The softer the cream cheese is, the easier. You can plow through cold cream cheese by dumping the sugar on top of it and scraping down the sides, but yes, your muscles will definitely tell you you've been working the next day.

3. Don't worry about "beating air in" by overmixing. I've never had this problem. Just make sure any lumps left in are only a few millimeters across (they will melt in during baking.)
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Vern
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 6:09 pm    Post subject: New york style cheesecke Reply with quote

This cake is awesome and so easy to make...once you follow the directions it comes out the same way every try.
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Allene
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 08, 2011 3:50 am    Post subject: NY-style cheesecake sans mixer Reply with quote

First of all, great recipe! I made it a few times in a gas oven that never seemed to get hot enough for anything, and tonight I'm making it again in a nice, reliable electric oven.
A long while back there were posts asking about making this without a mixer: I can tell you it's really not a problem at all. The secret is to make sure your cream cheese is room temperature (this can take a few hours, and I've never had it spoil on me) and then to use a fork to cream it. A potato masher could also work. Hope this is helpful to someone! Smile
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susanempire
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2011 2:53 pm    Post subject: New York Cheesecake recipe Reply with quote

I have made this recipe 4 times (one is in the oven right now). It is a great recipe. My first one had no cracks at all, the 2nd and 3rd did, but what does it really matter, you are going to cut it anyhow. Follow the recipe exactly, and you should have no problems. I try to make them on days when the humidity is high, if you live somewhere that this is not possible, use the water bath. Room temperature ingredients seem to work best. Give this recipe a try, you won't be disappointed.
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Olivia
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 05, 2012 9:00 am    Post subject: Excellent! Reply with quote

Thank you very much for such a great recipe. The Chessecake turned out to be the best cheescake I`ve ever had in my life. Excellent recipe! Smile I will definitely make it again and again.
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"Honey"
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2012 10:23 pm    Post subject: New York cheesecake Reply with quote

Thank God I found your website. Best cooking/baking directions I have ever
seen and I have been cooking for 47 years.THANK YOU!!!!!
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mics
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PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 8:42 pm    Post subject: over or underbaked? Reply with quote

Hi Michael,
A cheesecake I've just baked, developed a medium-sized crack around the center, as it was cooling.
My first thought was "overbaked". I took it out of the oven when the thermometer read 71 C, so maybe I should have taken it out a few minutes earlier.
But after cooling and chilling it, when I finally cut into it, I was surprised to see that the filling was very soft, almost mousse-like, particularly in the center, where apparently it has not fully set and was liquidy, even.
I can't figure it out. If it hasn't fully set when the temperature reached 71 C, should I have baked it longer?
And then why did it crack while it was cooling?
(I do have an oven thermometer, and try to keep the temperature as accurate as possible).
I hope you can help me understand what went wrong, and thank you in advance!
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Nathan Washington
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 4:42 pm    Post subject: cooking temperatures Reply with quote

I know I'm really late but I hope I can get a quick response since I'm going to make these very soon

my mum says to never cook higher than gas mark 2 because it burns everything so I wasn't sure about cooking it at gas 9(highest setting) for 10minutes while I also seen that cooking high temps is can be bad for the cheesecake
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1619
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 5:46 am    Post subject: Re: cooking temperatures Reply with quote

Nathan Washington wrote:
I know I'm really late but I hope I can get a quick response since I'm going to make these very soon

my mum says to never cook higher than gas mark 2 because it burns everything so I wasn't sure about cooking it at gas 9(highest setting) for 10minutes while I also seen that cooking high temps is can be bad for the cheesecake

So, what was the question?

I'm going to assume you are asking whether or not the instructions written in this recipe are correct and the answer is yes.

If the real question is how do you reconcile your mum's instructions vs the instructions here on this site, then there's no real answer. Perhaps your oven runs hot and gas mark 2 (normally around 325F or 165C) is actually higher than normal so anything above that burns food that is kept in there too long. There are oven thermometers that are able to handle the high heat of an oven and can give you an idea of whether or not your oven runs hot. They cost about $3-4 here in the US and I can only assume they would be a similar price if available in your country. If your oven does operate in the expected temperature ranges, then simply bake at Gas Mark 9 for ten minutes, and then lower to Gas Mark 3 for the rest of the baking process.
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Rhiannon
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2012 12:39 pm    Post subject: Best Recipe So Far Reply with quote

I bake a lot of cheesecakes and I go by this one every time.I never have a single crack and the texture is perfect.The only thing I do differently is bake at 225 for an hour and 15 minutes.When its done I turn off the oven and crack the oven door to let it cool completely.I use this recipe as every base for my cheesecakes.
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