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Recipe File: Cheesecake, Plain New York Style
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starved 4 food knowledge
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 29, 2010 10:02 am    Post subject: thermometer Reply with quote

I love the ease and format with pictures of all your recipes. I can't wait to try this recipe for an upcoming dinner party.

I only have an old-fashioned meat thermometer. Will it give me an accurate reading and how far into the cake should the point be?
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Owen Meany
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2010 7:57 pm    Post subject: NY Cheesecake Reply with quote

Outstanding recipe! Many thanks for sharing! Yesterday I made this cheesecake for a friend's birthday, it was just how I remember NY cheesecakes to be. No more visitng the city and having to dash straight away for a taste of of my favorite kind of cheesecake. I can now satisfy both my own and my partner's thrill of eating delicious NY cheescake.

Avoiding cracks... and bubble blemishes!
Because I have an electric oven, I placed a rectangle cake pan, half full of water, on a shelf just under the cheesecake. I unintentionally used cool water in the cakepan, not warm as suggested, and worried if the temperature of the oven would drop too much,yet the cake turned out great, flat across and no cracks or bubble blemishes. All ingredients were roughly room temperature before starting. I used a hand mixer for everything but the eggs which I incorporated by hand,one at a time, to avoid overbeating and getting air bubbles with the mixer. I bumped the bowl of mixture on the counter before putting it into a pan. Also, I bumped it some more , dropping the pan on the counter! And finally,I ran a knife in figure eights through the mixture,to break up trapped bubbles,before placing the pan into the oven.

During the last 40 minutes of baking I set the oven to about 205 or 210 because my oven light was going off and on when it was set at 200. This spooked me as I thought maybe the oven was not warm enough. The light seemed to stay on when I raised the tempurature a little. It was the fist time I used the oven at such a low setting so I did not know if the gauge was faulty or not. I never opened the oven durng the entire process. After the 100 minutes I tested the center and it was at 160. I moved it from the oven and quickly ran a knife around the edge. Then I placed a large pot over the cheesecake as it sat on a cooling rack to cool for two hours. Then to the fridge. The taste and texture were divine! No cracks! The slight lemon flavor-- especially appeciated. Oh, yea,the cheescake was not brown on top, just golden, my partner said it looked like sunshine. It was a pleaser. Thank you! Thank you!
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jkljk
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:56 pm    Post subject: Pan size Reply with quote

Can I use a 9-inch springform pan, or does it have to be a 10-inch springform pan?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

9 inch will work just fine.

do not fill it to the brim - it puffs up a bit as it bakes / sets. if you wind up with extra batter toss it or put it in a smaller ramekin & bake a little chef's treat . . .
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jkljk
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:02 pm    Post subject: Couple more questions Reply with quote

There's another recipe I've seen that's very similar, called Lindy's Cheesecake, and it uses a pastry crust. Could one use that crust with this recipe, and would that affect baking time?

Other wonderment........the Lindy's recipe calls for 5 eggs and 2 yolks, and 1/4 cup cream, whereas this one calls for 6 eggs and 2 yolks, and 1/2 cup cream. I guess my biggest question would be...............with the egg amount, cream amount, and the type of crust being pretty much the only differences, could I bake the Lindy's recipe exactly like this recipe? Sorry if this is unintelligible, I'm trying to sort out my questions as I ask them. Smile Thanks so much!

Oh, and all my springform pans are (I think) dark non-stick pans. How should I adjust the baking temp/time? Also, I don't have a thermometer. Any suggestions as to how to tell if it's done?
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2010 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

uhmmmm, lemme see....

you want to use a different crust and a different recipe for the filling, and the question is "does anything change?"

yes.

the basics are all the same - kill the clock and go by feel.
a cheese cake filling is essentially a custard - when it sets up to a firm point in the middle, it's done.

the best tip I've seen/learned to avoid cracking is: when done, turn off oven, leave oven door cracked/propped open; allow cheese cake to cool slowly in the oven.

good luck!
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anlivesay21
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 4:16 am    Post subject: cracks!!! Reply with quote

I used a different recipe because i only had a 9 inch pan and my cake cracked. Im not sure why but it did. does anyone have any advice?
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My first attempt was about six months ago, a sort of disaster, because I was using the continental conversions, and I misread the second bake as 200 degrees centigrade instead of 93 degrees centigrade. Ouch! We knew something was wrong when we could smell burning. However, I say as sort of disaster, because after it cooled down, we sliced it, cut off the burnt top, and it was fantastic, far better than any commercial cheesecake. No cracking either. Second attempt last night and I used a different brand of digestive biscuit for the base. Unfortunately, whilst the top has turned out a textbook study, perfect colouring, texture, and unbelievavable taste, the base is a slight let down, partly due to the taste of the different biscuit, and partly due to the fact that I think I may have over processed them resulting in a slurry rather than a crunchy base. Remember kids, don't drink and bake.
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:01 pm    Post subject: Re: the above Reply with quote

P.S.

Re: the above, I forget to mention, the reason why I even bothered to make a second attempt, was because the kids so enjoyed the first disaster, they kept hassling me to do it again.

(Your confirmation code is a bit of a bummer for the dyslexic)
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Gabo
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:04 pm    Post subject: please help Reply with quote

hello:

I've tried doing this cheesecake twice and I always have the same issue. First of all let me tell you what I changed. It's impossible to find heavy cream here so I used evaporated milk instead (as recommended earlier in the posts and throughout the internet). I start at 260 C. My oven has C degrees instead of F, but it still won't go as low as 96 C so after 10 minutes I leave it at about 110 C or 120, after 45 minutes I check the center of the cheesecake with a toothpick and I turn the oven off until no food comes out on the toothpick. The oven uses gas not electricity, and if I try to lower the temp. from 260 to 120 it will go off and its dangerous so I have to start lowering the temperature gradually until it gets to the lower temp. When the toothpick comes out clean, I leave the door closed until it cools down.
The cake tastes great, but the problem is that it kind of rises a little bit on the edges then it goes down so the sides of the cake are taller than the center, and after I chill it on the fridge, it comes out even lower in the center. No one that I've seen here has noticed that problem since they don't really know how a New York style cheescake ( not even me ) and I use the "basket" kind of shape to fill it out with fresh strawberries to hide my bad looking cake, which happens to make peolple here like it better.

Can anyone give me advice on what I'm doing wrong or what would be a best way to bake this cake?

Thanks in advance for any help.
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Dilbert



Joined: 19 Oct 2007
Posts: 1018
Location: central PA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

in the grand scheme of things, there's two 'types' of cheesecakes -

one is very dense
one is more fluffy

the fluffy bit is usually beaten more vigorously to introduce air into the filling 'batter'

the air heats, expands, things puff up.
puffing up more at the edges is indicative of too high a bake temp - the 'outside' of the cake is heating up faster than the 'middle'

the difficulties controlling the low bake temps you mention could be the basis of the problem.

'fixing' the oven could be a bit on the tricky side.
one classic approach to creating an even bake is a bain-marie - the water bath helps even out the temps of the baking pan.

just be sure the pan does not let water from the bain-marie seep into the cheese cake crust . . .
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Lutz, FL
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 08, 2010 9:36 pm    Post subject: NY Cheesecake Reply with quote

First I'd like to thank the engineer that gave us this marvelous recipe. I've been making this cheesecake now for over 2 years and everyone loves it and says it's the best cheesecake they've ever had! I too have had issues with the cracking, though minimal, and I find it best to drop the pan on the counter as suggested and running a knife through it as well. Use of a large stainless steel bowl over the top while cooling also helps.
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tomten
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PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 2:19 pm    Post subject: cheesecake Reply with quote

People have been posting comments about your cheesecake for nearly five years, and rightly so. Thankfully I found your recipe, followed your instructions, and took the cheesecake to work to share. Everyone raved about it. My cake was quite yellow because I used local, "free-range" eggs. Thank you so much for your careful website.
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Kaiepooh
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:55 am    Post subject: Sugar subsitute Reply with quote

Hi I am trying to cut calories and make this as sugar free as I can. can you use sugar substitute like equal or splendar? I know that it may not taste as great but I need to for a friend who is diabetic..

Thanks
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:12 pm    Post subject: very confused Reply with quote

tried this recipe. after about 7 minutes at 500, my cheesecake was so burnt on top that I'm pretty sure I'm not going to eat it. this is a pretty mediocre 25 year old oven, so we're not talking about some over-efficient oven. and we're not talking a little brown. I've eaten a lot of new york cheesecake and know that beautiful light brown look. we're talking burnt here.

I love cheesecake but rarely find one worth eating. it is funny how hard it is to find a good cheesecake. I thought from the comments this might be it, but this first experience was a real turnoff.
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