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parchment paper
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 8:15 pm    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

Hi,
Was wandering if someone could tell me if by using parchment paper to line a cookie sheet would make a crispier cookie? Also when using parchment paper does the cookie brown faster?


Thanks
Mumu
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SirShazar



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It won't make a difference in terms of browning, but it is nonstick.
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:20 pm    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

Reason ask was told if using a air bake cookie sheet and used parchment paper on it it would produce a crispier cookie and more even browning. Any one else heard of this? So I thought using parchment paper would produce a crispier cookie on a reg. cookie pan? Any help on this?


Mumu
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AdmNaismith not signed in
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2007 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think Alton Brown has a 3-fold recipe for a crispy, a regular, and a cakey cookie. Search around for that. The baking sheet has little to do with it.
Basically you are looking for a recipe with a maximum amount of butter/shortening, and a minimum amount of flour.
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
Posts: 535

PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2007 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AdmNaismith not signed in wrote:
I think Alton Brown has a 3-fold recipe for a crispy, a regular, and a cakey cookie. Search around for that. The baking sheet has little to do with it.
Basically you are looking for a recipe with a maximum amount of butter/shortening, and a minimum amount of flour.


Here it is:

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1099&highlight=alton+brown+cookie

The crispest, most well done, possibly burned bottom would be on a regular cookie sheet. I like the double layered air sheets because they cook most evenly. Parchment may help in making the bottom brown slightly less and be less crisp because it can act as a slight insulator from the direct heat of the oven. I would not use parchment paper or a silpat if you want a very crisp bottom. It is worth a little experimentation, though.
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 10:27 pm    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

Gary Protein,


When you use your double layer air sheets ,how does your cookie turn out? Brown, less brown, or what ? Do you use parchment paper with it? Been reading if you use parchment paper with these types of pan will have a browner bottom on bottom, but what you said this is not true, Right?



Thanks,

Mumu
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 6:36 am    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

Using parchment paper in lining cake pans ,do you grease and flour paper ?

Mumu
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1629
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 7:20 am    Post subject: Re: parchment paper Reply with quote

mumu33 wrote:
Using parchment paper in lining cake pans ,do you grease and flour paper ?

Didn't you already private message me with this question? The answer is still no. It is not necessary to grease and flour the parchment paper.
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 3:47 pm    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

Sorry if i did ask you, but thought it was only on greasing it, not flouring it. Im making a cake that says in recipe to line pan with parchment paper and to make sure you grease and flour it.


Mumu
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Michael Chu



Joined: 10 May 2005
Posts: 1629
Location: Austin, TX (USA)

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What type of cake are you making? It's kind of weird to have to grease and flour the paper since you can just easily peel it off the cake as you remove it to cool. However, if the cake is exceptionally "sticky" then you may want to grease and flour it - so the type of cake would be interesting information to know.
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 5:40 pm    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

I just found out the recipe i have is from a friend who says the only reason she did this is for ulimate cake release insurance.


Mumu
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 5:20 pm    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

was wandering on the cake pan how do you grease and flour the sides of pan, or do you not. Would be using parchment paper and having trouble getting paper along sides. HELP.


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mumu
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GaryProtein



Joined: 26 Oct 2005
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just grease the sides of the pan using your hands, NOT with a buttery paper towel over them which will minimize the butter on the sides, then put in an ounce or so of sifted flour, shake it to cover, then spill out what's left. You don't need parchment paper on the sides. The key is to have some flour left that you need to spill out. The cake will come out very nicely. Don't stir batter after you pour it in. Let it settle itself.

If it is a dark chocolate cake, you can coat the greased sides with cocoa powder or a mix of cocoa and flour if you like. That adds a nice chocolatey coat.
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mumu33



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 2:43 am    Post subject: parchment paper Reply with quote

thank you for your advice. Is greasing the pan before you put parchment paper in right or can you not grease pan and put parchment paper in. Just starting off in baking and would like to get off on the right foot on which way to do this . Reynolds web site say not to grease the pan first just lay parchment paper circle on bottom of pan and if desired grease sides, and other places see greasing pan first before using parchment paper, could you please give me your advice on this.


Mumu
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SirShazar



Joined: 30 Jul 2007
Posts: 89

PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2007 3:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In this case the only purpose of greasing the pan would be to help adhere the parchment to the pan.
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